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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 773 9 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 445 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 83 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 50 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 48 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 45 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 36 2 Browse Search
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Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 3 (search)
t again before its shores are desecrated by Yankee feet. I wish sister would hurry home, on account of the servants. We can't take control over them, and they won't do anything except just what they please. As soon as she had gone, Mr. Ballou, the overseer, took himself off and only returned late this evening. Harriet, Mrs. Green Butler's maid, is the most trifling of the lot, but I can stand anything from her because she refused to go off with the Yankees when Mrs. Butler had her in Marietta last summer. Her mother went, and tried to persuade Harriet to go, too, but she said: I loves Miss Julia a heap better'n I do you, and remained faithful. Sister keeps her here because Mrs. Butler is a refugee and without a home herself. Jan. 16, Monday Sister has come back, bringing dear little Mrs. Sims with her. Metta and I are to spend next week in Albany with Mrs. Sims, if we are not all water-bound in the meantime, at Pine Bluff. The floods are subsiding up the country, but
Eliza Frances Andrews, The war-time journal of a Georgia girl, 1864-1865, chapter 4 (search)
Judge Garnett Andrews, to the Union, precluded anything like political sympathy or personal intimacy between him and Georgia's strenuous war governor. At the hotel we found all our traveling companions, who had come out from Macon, with a number of other fugitives, and while waiting for Fred and Mr. Toombs to hunt up conveyances, we amused ourselves getting acquainted and exchanging experiences with our fellow sufferers. Among the ones I liked best, were Mrs. Young and Dr. Morrow, from Marietta. Mrs. Walthall introduced us to her escort, Col. Lockett, an old bachelor, but as foolish about the girls as if he was a widower. Our pretty girl from Montgomery was there, too, but I did not learn her name, and a poor little Mrs. Smith from somewhere, with a sick, puny baby that everybody felt sorry for. Mrs. Howell and Mrs. Wardlaw, mother and sister of Mrs. Jefferson Davis, were also among the unfortunates stranded at that awful Milledgeville Hotel. Mrs. Howell was a stout old lady wi
Chickamauga, in baffling Sherman in February, 1864, and in General J. E. Johnston's retreat from North Georgia, his courage and skill made him one of the main supports of the Confederate cause in the West. Whoever was at the head, it was upon Polk and Hardee, the corps commanders, as upon two massive pillars, that the weight of organization and discipline rested. General Polk was made a lieutenant-general, October 10, 1862, and was killed by a shell aimed at him, June 14, 1864, near Marietta, Georgia, while boldly reconnoitring the enemy's position. Hon. Thomas C. Reynolds, the constitutional Lieutenant-Governor of Missouri, and, after Governor Jackson's death, its legal Governor, has given the writer his recollections of General Johnston at Columbus. Himself a gentleman of fine talents and culture, Governor Reynolds's opinions and impressions cannot fail to receive consideration: My recollections of your illustrious father are of little or no historical interest. Soon a
there that he probably refers. General Thomas was ordered to arrest the reporter, and have him hanged as a spy; but old Pap Thomas' kind heart banished him to the north of the Ohio for the remainder of the war, instead. When Sherman's headquarters were at Big Shanty, there was a signal station located in his rear, on the roof of an old gin-house, and this signal officer, having the key to the enemy's signals, reported to Sherman that he had translated this signal from Pine Mountain to Marietta,--Send an ambulance for General Polk's body, --which was the first tidings received by our army that the fighting bishop had been slain. He was hit by a shell from a volley of artillery fired by order of General Sherman. To the men in the other arms of the service, who saw this mysterious and almost continuous waving of flags, it seemed as if every motion was fraught with momentous import. What could it all be about? they would ask one another. A signal station was located, in ‘61-2
man, Jonathan, 303,305 Lewis' milk, 125 Lice, 80-82 Lincoln, Abraham, 15-16,18-20, 22, 34, 42, 44-45, 60, 71, 157, 162, 198,250,253,315 Longstreet, James, 296,403 Logan, John, 262-63 Long Island, Mass., 44-45 Lowell, Mass., 44 Ludington, Marshall I., 371-76 Lyon, Nathaniel, 118-19 Lynchburg, Va., 350 Lynnfield, Mass., 44 McClellan, George B., 51, 71, 157, 176, 198,251-54, 257,259,277, 298,303-4, 355-56,378 McDowell, Irvin, 71,250-52 Magoffin, Beriah, 280 Marietta, Ga., 404 Meade, George G., 72, 262, 304, 313, 340,344,349,359,367,371-75 Meade Station, Va., 351 Medical examination, 41-42 Merrimac, 271 Mine Run campaign, 134, 308, 347 Monitor, 270 Morgan, C. H., 267 Mosby, John S., 370 Mules, 279-97 Myer, Albert J., 395-96 Nelson, William, 405 Newburg, N. Y., 395 New York Herald, 403; North Cambridge, Mass., 44 Old Capitol Prison, 162 Olustee, Fl., 270 Ord, E. O. C., 264 O'Reilly, Miles, 223 Parke, John G.,
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Dalton-Atlanta operations. (search)
s, and General Sherman was deceived by reports of efforts to retake them and night attacks, which were never made by our troops. If the Confederate troops were so incessantly beaten, it is unaccountable that they were permitted to remain before Marietta four weeks, and then shifted their ground only to avoid losing their communications. The attack on Hooker and Schofield on the 22d, was made against orders by General Hood with Stevenson's Division, supported by Hindman's. It was defeated by inse who, like the writer, have often witnessed the vigorous and persistent courage of American soldiers, the best of whom were not superior to General Sherman's. But the testimony of the ten thousand and thirty-six graves in the Union Cemetery at Marietta, of soldiers killed south of the Etowah, is conclusive. Less than two thousand of them fell in the actions about Atlanta. But at least three thousand were killed north of the Etowah, and buried at Chattanooga. As the towns and villages in the
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sherman's campaign in Georgia-siege of Atlanta --death of General McPherson-attempt to capture Andersonville-capture of Atlanta (search)
at point, the intrenchments completed, store-houses provided for food, and the army got in readiness for a further advance. The rains, however, were falling in such torrents that it was impossible to move the army by the side roads which they would have to move upon in order to turn Johnston out of his new position. While Sherman's army lay here, General F. P. Blair returned to it, bringing with him the two divisions of veterans who had been on furlough. Johnston had fallen back to Marietta and Kenesaw Mountain, where strong intrenchments awaited him. At this latter place our troops made an assault [June 27] upon the enemy's lines after having got their own lines up close to him, and failed, sustaining considerable loss. But during the progress of the battle Schofield was gaining ground to the left; and the cavalry on his left were gaining still more toward the enemy's rear. These operations were completed by the 3d of July, when it was found that Johnston had evacuated the
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 40 (search)
salaries of Custis and myself amount now to $8000 per annum, we have the greatest difficulty to subsist. I hope we shall speedily have better times, and I think, unless some terrible misfortune happens to our arms, the invader will surely be soon hurled from our soil. What President Lincoln came to Grant for is merely conjecture-unquestionably he could not suggest any military enterprise more to our detriment than would occur to his generals. June 29 Clear and cool-afterward hazy. Marietta, June 27th. General Braxton Bragg. The enemy advanced on our whole line to-day. They assaulted French, Cheatham, Cleburn, Stevenson, and Quarles, by whom they were repulsed. On the rest of the line the skirmishing was severe. Their loss is supposed to be great. Ours is known to be small. J. E. Johnston, General. The dispatch from Gen. Johnston gives an encouraging account of the fight in Georgia. But a dispatch from the West states that reinforcements (20,000) for Sher
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 44 (search)
s progress is not checked, he will soon be throwing shells at us. But Lee is there, digging also. Flour rose yesterday to $125 per barrel, meal to $72 per bushel, and bacon $10 per pound. Fortunately, I got 100 pounds of flour from North Carolina a few days ago at $1.20 per pound. And Thomas, my son, detailed as clerk for Gen. Kemper, will draw 30 pounds of flour and 10 pounds bacon per month. October 5 Bright, and very warm. There is a report that Gen. Hood's army is at Marietta, in Sherman's rear, and it may be so. One of the clerks (Mr. Bechtel) was killed yesterday by one of the enemy's sharpshooters at Chaffin's Farm. He was standing on the parapet, looking in the direction of the enemy's pickets. He had been warned to no purpose. He leaves a wife and nine children. A subscription is handed round, and several thousand dollars will be raised. Gen. R. E. Lee was standing near when he fell. All is quiet to-day. But they are impressing the negro men f
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 45 (search)
, who win his favor, get his certificate of exemption, as necessary for the State administration. A dispatch from Gen. Wheeler, Jonesborough, November 14th, says Sherman has three corps at Atlanta, and is destroying railroads between him and Marietta, probably intending to move forward-farther South. Another dispatch from Gen. W., dated 14th inst., Lovejoy's, Georgia, says scouts from enemy's rear report that Sherman left Atlanta yesterday morning, with 15th, 17th, and 21st corps, in two columns, one on the Jonesborough, and one on the McDonough Roads-cavalry on his flanks. Many houses have been burned in Rome, Marietta, and Atlanta, and the railroad bridge over Chattanooga River (in his rear) Enemy advancing this morning. To Gen. Bragg. Twelve M. Still another dispatch from Gen. Wheeler to Gen. Bragg, dated Jonesborough, 3 P. M., 15th inst. Enemy advanced early this morning with infantry, cavalry, artillery, and wagonshave driven our cavalry back upon this place-strength
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