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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 773 9 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 445 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 83 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 50 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 48 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 45 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 36 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Marietta (Georgia, United States) or search for Marietta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
ranted him in claiming that he was purposely drawing us far from our base, and that when the right moment should come he would turn on us and destroy us. We were equally confident, and not the least alarmed. He then fell back to his position at Marietta, with Brush Mountain on his right, Kenesaw his center, and Lost Mountain his left. His line of ten miles was too long for his numbers, and he soon let go his flanks and concentrated on Kenesaw. We closed down in battle array, repaired the railto await Hood's initiative. This followed soon. Hood, sending his cavalry ahead, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Campbelltown with his main army on the 1st of October, and moved to Dallas, detaching a strong force against the railroad above Marietta which destroyed it for fifteen miles, and then sent French's division to capture Allatoona. I followed Hood, reaching Kenesaw Mountain in time to see in the distance the attack on Allatoona, which was handsomely repulsed by Corse. Hood then mo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
ee's corps to Gilgal Church, Polk's right near the Marietta and Ackworth road and Hood's corps massed beyond tountain and its right beyond the Burnt Hickory and Marietta road. In the morning of the 14th General Hardeeng from Loring's left across the Lost Mountain and Marietta road. The enemy approached as usual, under cover , in the 10,126 graves in the Military Cemetery at Marietta, of soldiers killed south of the Etowah. Many of the burials at Marietta were of soldiers who died of disease before and after the battle of Kenesaw Mountain army were chosen, one nine or ten miles south of Marietta, and the other on the high ground near the Chattah0th to July 3d. The army occupied positions about Marietta twenty-six days, in which the want of artillery amr the circumstances, impregnable. We had defended Marietta, which had not a tenth of its strength, twenty-sixn's testimony and that of the Military Cemetery at Marietta refute the charge. I assert that had one of the o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
lost about three hundred men and the Union troops must have lost more than ten times as many. This was an assault made upon troops of the Fifteenth Corps by two brigades of Bate's Confederate division and Armstrong's brigade of Jackson's cavalry dismounted, supported by Smith's brigade of Bate's division and Ferguson's and Ross's brigades of Jackson's cavalry. Lewis's Kentucky brigade attacked the front of Osterhaus's division without success. Bullock's Florida brigade charged along the Marietta road and was driven back, with heavy loss, by the fire of the 53d Ohio regiment. Armstrong assailed the position held by Walcutt's brigade across the Villa Rica road and met a bloody repulse. General Bate officially reported the loss in his division as 450. General Walcutt in his official report says that 244 dead and wounded rebels were found in my front, and many were doubtless removed. The Confederate loss in this very small affair was, therefore, over seven hundred. The loss of the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
ol. William G. Halpin; 2d Ohio, Ordered to Chattanooga July 27th. Col. Anson G. McCook, Capt. James F. Sarratt; 33d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. James H. M. Montgomery, Capt. T. A. Minshall; 94th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Rue P. Hutchins; 10th Wis., Ordered to Marietta July 28th. Capt. Jacob W. Roby; 21st Wis., Lieut.-Col. Harrison C. Hobart, Maj. Michael H. Fitch. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John H. King, Col. William L. Stoughton, Brig.-Gen. John H. King, Col. William L. Stoughton, Col. Marshall F. Moore, Briively. Col. Gustave Kammerling; 35th Ohio, Relieved for muster-out May 22d and August 3d, respectively. Maj. Joseph L. Budd; 105th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George T. Perkins. Third Brigade, Col. George P. Este: 10th Ind., Part of time detached at Marietta. Lieut.-Col. Marsh B. Taylor; 74th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Myron Baker, Maj. Thomas Morgan; 10th Ky., Col. William H. Hays; 18th Ky., Detached at Ringggold. Lieut.-Col. Hubbard K. Milward; 14th Ohio, Maj. John W. Wilson, Capt. George W. Kirk; 38th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
advance that day that we came in contact with the Georgia Cadets from the Military Institute at Marietta, who had come out from the woods at Resaca and formed their line behind a rail fence. After a Kenesaws, and placed a heavier one along the southern slope, reaching far beyond the Dallas and Marietta road. He drew back his left and fortified. The whole line was stronger in artificial contrivae railway crosses the Chattahoochee. Thomas, taking up the pursuit, followed his enemy through Marietta and beyond. My command skirmished up to the Smyrna works during the 3d. The next day Sherman d 4th of October, rendezvoused at the old battle-field of Smyrna Camp, and the next day reached Marietta and Kenesaw. The telegraph wires had been cut above Marietta, and learning that heavy masses oMarietta, and learning that heavy masses of infantry, artillery, and cavalry had been seen from Kenesaw (marching north), I inferred that Allatoona was their objective point; and on the 4th of October I signaled from Vining's Station to Kenes
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Georgia militia about Atlanta. (search)
n the 1st of June, and began to prepare them for the field. About the middle of June General Mansfield Lovell came from Marietta to explain to me the condition of affairs near that place and General Johnston's views in reference to the special servithe extension of Sherman's army on that side might be checked, and the Confederates could permanently hold position near Marietta. I told General Lovell that I did not believe the small available force of raw militia, acting as a support to the cavahe position then occupied by General Johnston's army strongly intrenched at Smyrna Station, six or eight miles south of Marietta. The affair at Smyrna Station, that day, is reported by General Sherman as follows: We celebrate our 4th of July urb of Atlanta. . . . but was scarcely established in camp before we had to be placed in the trenches on the left of the Marietta road, and from that time until the end of the siege we continued under close fire night and day. We had to move from one
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.43 (search)
Howbeit, the presence of 34,000 Federal prisoners at Andersonville rendered it absolutely incumbent to place the army between Sherman and that point, in order to prevent the Federal commander from turning loose this large body. . . Thus the proximity of these prisoners to Sherman's army not only forced me to remain in a position to guard the country against the fearful calamity aforementioned, but also thwarted my design to move north, across Peach Tree Creek and the Chattahoochee, back to Marietta, where I would have destroyed the enemy's communications and supplies, and then have taken position near the Alabama line, with the Blue Mountain railroad in rear, by which means the Confederate army could, with ease, have been provisioned. In lieu of the foregoing operations, the battle of Jonesboro' was fought, and on the following day, September 1st, at 2 A. M., Lieutenant-General Lee, with his corps, marched from Jonesboro' to the vicinity of Rough and Ready, and so posted his troops
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
been previously advised of [Jefferson] Davis's movements, and had given the necessary instructions to secure a clue to the route he intended following, with the hope of finally effecting his capture. I directed General Upton to proceed in person to Augusta, and ordered General Winslow, with the Fourth Division, to march to Atlanta for the purpose of carrying out the terms of the convention, as well as to make such a disposition of his forces, covering the country northward from Forsyth to Marietta, so as to secure the arrest of Jefferson Davis and party. I directed General Croxton, [then] commanding the First Division, to distribute it along the line of the Ocmulgee, connecting with the Fourth Division and extending southward to this place. Colonel Minty, commanding the Second Division, was directed to extend his troops along the line of the Ocmulgee and Altamaha rivers as far as Jacksonville. General McCook, with about five hundred men of his division, was sent to Tallahassee, Fl