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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 85 15 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 6 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 3 1 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Art of Poetry: To the Pisos (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Campus Martius (Ohio, United States) or search for Campus Martius (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 50 results in 30 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blennerhassett, Harman, 1764- (search)
s of Irish descent: educated at the University of Dublin; studied law and practised there; and in 1796 married the beautiful Adelaide Agnew, daughter of General Agnew. who was killed in the battle at Germantown, 1777. Being a republican in principle, he became involved in the political troubles in Ireland in 1798. Blennerhassett's Island residence. when he sold his estates in England. and came to America with an ample fortune. He purchased an island in the Ohio River. nearly opposite Marietta, built an elegant mansion, furnished it luxuriantly, and there he and his accomplished wife were living in happiness and contentment, surrounded by books. philosophical apparatus, pictures, and other means for intellectual culture, when Aaron Burr entered that paradise, and tempted and ruined its dwellers. A mob of militiamen laid the island waste, in a degree. and Blennerhassett and his wife became fugitives in 1807. He was prosecuted as an accomplice of Burr, but was discharged. Then
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brough, John, 1811-1865 (search)
Brough, John, 1811-1865 Journalist born in Marietta, O., in 1811; learned the printer's trade in the office of the Marietta Gazette; and was editor of Democratic newspapers in Lancaster and Cincinnati. He held several State offices in Ohio: was a member of the joint commission to adjust the boundary line between that State and Virginia; became a popular Democratic orator; was an active war Democrat in the early part of the Civil War; and was elected governor of Ohio as the Republic-Union candidate in 1863. He died in Cleveland, O., Aug. 29, 1865.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buell, Don Carlos, (search)
Buell, Don Carlos, Military officer; born near Marietta, O., March 23, 1818; was graduated at West Point in 1841; engaged in the war with Mexico, in which he won the brevets of captain and major, and was severely wounded; became lieutenant-colonel in the regular army, and brigadier-general of volunteers in May, 1861; major-general of volunteers in March, 1802; and, with an army, arrived on the battle-field of Shiloh (q. v.) in time to assist in the defeat of the Confederates. In command of the District of Ohio, he confronted Bragg's invasion of Kentucky and drove him out of the State. On Oct. 24 he transferred his command to General Rosecrans; was mustered out of the volunteer service May 23, 1864; and resigned his commission in the regular Army June 1, 1865, when he became president of the Green River Iron Company. in Kentucky. He died near Rockport, Ky., Nov. 19, 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
up conveniences for a long voyage. Wilkinson was not ready, and the impatient Burr proceeded without him. He stopped at Blennerhassett's Island, nearly opposite Marietta, then inhabited by a wealthy and accomplished Irish gentleman of that name, who had created there a paradise for himself (see Blennerhassett, Harman). He had a phe urged the latter to use his influence to get Burr elected to Congress from that district. Thence Burr went eastward, stopping at Cincinnati, Chillicothe, and Marietta, everywhere conversing with leading men, to whom he gave only attractive hints of a brilliant scheme in hand. He spent that winter and the following spring and foot with an Ohio senator to furnish supplies for an army in the West and the purchase of two gunboats he was building for the government. A mercantile house at Marietta, in which Blennerhassett had been a partner, was authorized to purchase provisions, and a kiln was erected on Blennerhassett Island for drying corn to fit it for
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cemeteries, National (search)
781,374 Culpeper, Va456911 Known.Unknown. Danville. Va1,172155 Fredericksburg, Va2,48712,770 Fort Harrison, Va236575 Glendale, Va 234961 Hampton, Va4,930494 Poplar Grove, Va2,1973,993 Richmond, Va8425,700 Seven Pines, Va 1501,208 Staunton, Va 233520 Winchester, Va 2,0942,365 Yorktown, Va 7481,434 Newbern, N. C.2,1771,077 Raleigh, N. C.619562 Salisbury, N. C.9412,032 Wilmington, N. C 7101,398 Beaufort, S. C.4,7484,493 Florence, S C.1992,799 Andersonville, Ga12,793921 Marietta, Ga7,1882,963 Barrancas, Fla 798657 Mobile, Ala756113 Corinth, Miss 1,7893,927 Natchez, Miss3082.780 Vicksburg, Miss3,89612,704 Alexandria, La534772 Baton Rouge, La2,469495 Chalmette, La 6,8375,674 Port Hudson, La5963,223 Brownsville, Tex 1,4171,379 San Antonio, Tex324167 Fayetteville, Ark 431781 Fort Smith, Ark 7111,152 Little Rock, Ark 3,2652,337 Chattanooga, Tenn 7,9994,963 Fort Donelson, Tenn158511 Knoxville, Tenn2,0901,046 Memphis, Tenn 5,1608,817 Nashville, Tenn 11,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
ed States House of Representatives repealed the Fugitive Slave law.—17. Near Atlanta 600 Confederate conscripts fled to the Union lines.—22. Battle of Culp's Farm, Ga.—24. Maryland Constitutional Convention passed an emancipation clause.—25. General Pillow, with 3,000 Confederates, repulsed at Lafayette, Tenn. —27. General Carr defeated the Confederates near St. Charles, Mo.—30. Secretary Chase, of the Treasury, resigned his office. —July 1. General Sherman captured 3,000 prisoners near Marietta, Ga.—3. General Sherman occupied Kenesaw Mountain at daylight.—4. A national salute of doubleshotted cannon fired into Petersburg, Va. —5. The Confederates in Jackson flanked and driven out by General Slocum. Gen. Bradley Johnson, with 3,000 Confederate troops, crossed the Potomac into Maryland.—9. Governor Brown, of Georgia, called out the reserve militia, from fifteen to fifty-five years of age. A mass-meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, adopted resolutions of sympathy with t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cutler, Manasseh 1742-1823 (search)
Cutler, Manasseh 1742-1823 Clergyman; born in Killingly, Conn., May 3, 1742; graduated at Yale College in 1765; studied theology; was ordained in 1771; was a chaplain of a regiment in the army in 1776; became an excellent botanist; and gave the first scientific description of the plants of New England. As agent for the Ohio Company in 1787, he bought 1,500,000 acres of land northwest of the Ohio, and started the first company of emigrants to that region, who founded the town of Marietta in April, 1787. He travelled thither in a sulky (a two-wheeled, oneseated carriage), 750 miles in twenty-nine days. He was a member of Congress in 1800-4. He died in Hamilton, Mass., July 28, 1823.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
e strongly marked qualities which have always distinguished them. For a long time it was difficult to ascertain the political and legal status of the settlers on the Reserve. The State of Connecticut did not assume jurisdiction over its people, because the State had parted with her claim to the soil. By a proclamation of Governor St. Clair, in 1788, Washington county had been organized, having its limits extended westward to the Scioto and northward to the mouth of the Cuyahoga, with Marietta as the county seat. These limits included a portion of the Western Reserve. But the Connecticut settlers did not consider this a practical government, and most of them doubted its legality. By the end of the century seven counties, Washington, Hamilton, Ross, Wayne, Adams, Jefferson, and Knox, had been created, but none of them were of any practical service to the settlers on the Reserve. No magistrate had been appointed for that portion of the country, no civil process was establishe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Heckewelder, John Gottlieb Ernestus 1743-1823 (search)
lly their language, and producing a vocabulary. In 1762 he accompanied Christian Post on a mission to the Indians in Ohio; and in 1797 he was sent to superintend a mission on the Muskingum River. He settled at Bethlehem, Pa., after an adventurous career, and published (1819) a History of the manners and customs of the Indian Nations who formerly inhabited Pennsylvania and the neighboring States. He died in Bethlehem, Pa., Jan. 21, 1823. His daughter, Johanna Maria, was born at the present village of Port Washington, April 20, 1781, and was the first white child born within the present limits of Ohio. She lived a maiden at Bethlehem, Pa., until about 1870. In a diary kept by the younger pupils of the Bethlehem boarding-school, where Miss Heckewelder was educated, under date of Dec. 23, 1788 (the year when Marietta, William Heath. O., was founded), occurs the following sentence: Little Miss Maria Heckewelder's papa returned from Fort Pitt, which occasioned her and us great joy.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hildreth, Samuel Prescott 1783-1863 (search)
Hildreth, Samuel Prescott 1783-1863 Physiclan; born in Methuen, Mass., Sept. 30, 1783; graduated in medicine in 1805; began practice in Marietta, O., in 1808. He was time author of Pioneer history; Lives of the early settlers of Ohio; Contributions to the early history of the Northwest, etc. He died in Marietta, O., July 24, 1863. Hildreth, Samuel Prescott 1783-1863 Physiclan; born in Methuen, Mass., Sept. 30, 1783; graduated in medicine in 1805; began practice in Marietta, O., in 1808. He was time author of Pioneer history; Lives of the early settlers of Ohio; Contributions to the early history of the Northwest, etc. He died in Marietta, O., July 24, 1863.
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