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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 942 140 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 719 719 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 641 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 465 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 407 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 319 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 301 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 274 274 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 224 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 199 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
d if a movement was made in a very few days. For my part I hope so. To John Sergeant Meade: camp Pierpont, Va., November 14, 1861. I am very badly off for horses. The horse Baldy, remained with General Meade in the field until the spring of 1864. He was wounded twice at the first battle of Bull Run under General Hunter, and under General Meade he was wounded in the flank at the second battle of Bull Run, shot through the neck at Antietam, wounded at Fredericksburg, and again at Gettysburg, the ball remaining in his body. In the spring of 1864, General Meade, fearing that he might become an embarrassment in the campaign which was about to commence, sent him to Philadelphia, where he outlived his master. I first got has been an excellent horse in his day, but General Hunter broke him down at Bull Run. First battle of Bull Run, Va., July 21, 1861. The other one has rheumatism in his legs, and has become pretty much unserviceable. This has always been my luck with horses;
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
nication with Williamsport. His marching on Gettysburg meant the maintenance of the invasion. He wd Carlisle Road, not shown on map, enters Gettysburg from the north. to Rock Creek, Rock Creeke engagement and of the death of Reynolds at Gettysburg. Upon receipt of the intelligence of this nyou that Maj. General Reynolds was killed at Gettysburg this morning. You will inform General Sykes there, for Taneytown is thirteen miles from Gettysburg, the commanding general had sent to Hancock Corps have been engaged all day in front of Gettysburg. The Twelfth, Third and Fifth have been mov, through its entanglement in the streets of Gettysburg with the fragments of the Eleventh Corps, itto Hunterstown, and was moving thence toward Gettysburg, to take position on the left of Lee's army,illery along Seminary Ridge from the town of Gettysburg to the Peach Orchard. To meet this move Gent of the injury he had inflicted upon him at Gettysburg though satisfied that he had been severely p[152 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
lattered in this belief by the operations at Gettysburg. A few days having passed I am now profound communicate in any other way. Your fight at Gettysburg met with universal approbation of all militoned, see Appendix F. He says the victory of Gettysburg was due entirely to the strength of the posirt I had heard that Frank had been killed at Gettysburg. She says her parents are at Port Gibson, cmore to do with my operations and success at Gettysburg than either Burnside or McClellan; but I pre of Sickles, that I had ordered a retreat at Gettysburg, and that that battle was fought in spite of a week thereafter had gained the victory of Gettysburg? This combined attack in the committee anthe committee, where he gave testimony about Gettysburg. Have you seen the article in the Herald, sy and thanked by Congress for my services at Gettysburg, and that no attention should be paid to sus the anniversary of the last day's fight at Gettysburg. As I reflect on that eventful period, and [13 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 7 (search)
r, as he was borne to his last resting-place past banks on which, drawn up at intervals in line, stood regiment after regiment, with its band playing a dirge as his requiem, the notes of one becoming fainter and fainter as those of the next were wafted down the stream. And so, to the landing at Laurel Hill, the strange stillness, broken only by the sad music, followed the dead as his mortal remains were borne near to their resting-place through the scenes which he had loved so well. They laid to rest with the last sad rites, beside his eldest boy, called away in the dark hours of the war, the hero of Gettysburg, the record of whose simple tombstone reads: George Gordon Meade, Major-General U. S. Army. Born in Cadiz, Spain, Dec. 31st, 1815. Died in Phila., Pa., Nov. 6th, 1872. He did his work bravely and is at rest. So lived and died one who, according to those who knew him best, whether parent, brother, sister, wife, child, friend, or fellow-soldier, bore himself nobly.
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 8 (search)
Appendix a: document, Halleck to Meade, mentioned in letter of July 8, 1863. see page 132, Vol. II Halleck to Meade: Washington, July 7, 1863, 2.55 P. M. It gives me great pleasure to inform you that you have been appointed a Brig. Gen. in the Regular Army to rank from July 3rd, the date of your brilliant victory at Gettysburg.
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 9 (search)
s work, so gloriously prosecuted thus far, by the literal or substantial destruction of Lee's Army the rebellion will be over. Yours truly A. Lincoln. Halleck to Meade: July 7, 8.45 P. M. You have given the enemy a stunning blow at Gettysburg, follow it up and give him another before he can cross the Potomac. When he crosses circumstances will determine whether it will be best to pursue him by the Shenandoah Valley or this side of Blue Ridge. There is strong evidence that he is shravery of my men to settle the question, but I should be wrong not to frankly tell you of the difficulties encountered. I expect to find the enemy in a strong position, well covered with artillery, and I do not desire to imitate his example at Gettysburg and assault a position when the chances are so greatly against success. I wish in advance to moderate the expectation of those who, in ignorance of the difficulties to be encountered, may expect too much. All that I can do under the circumsta
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix D (search)
Appendix D Letter from General McClellan to General Meade on his victory at Gettysburg, mentioned in letter of July 21, 1863. see page 136, Vol. II New York, July 11, 1863. my dear General: I have abstained from writing to you simply because I hear that you have no time to read letters—but I will say a word now, anyhow. I wish to offer you my sincere and heartfelt congratulations upon the glorious victory you have achieved, and the splendid way in which you assumed control of our noble old army under such trying circumstances. You have done all that could be done and the Army of the Potomac has supported you nobly. I don't know that, situated as I am, my opinion is worth much to any of you-but I can trust saying that I feel very proud of you and my old Army. I don't flatter myself that your work is over—I believe that you have another severe battle to fight, but I am confident that you will win. That God may bless you and your army in its future conflicts i
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix E (search)
ion, one of the noblest souls among men, one of the most accomplished officers of this army—Major-General John F. Reynolds, I cannot receive this sword without thinking of that officer, and the heroic manner in which he met his fate in front at Gettysburg. There I lost, not only a lieutenant most important to me in his services, but a friend and brother. When I think, too, of others fallen—of McNeill and Taylor, of the Rifles; of Simmons, of the Fifth; of DeHone of Massachusetts; of young Kuhng to bear the numbers which are required, they will themselves yield. Before I close, let me add what I had intended to say before, but it escaped my memory until this moment, an expression of my gratification that I heard that on the field of Gettysburg the division of the Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, under your command, enacted deeds worthy of its former reputation, and proved that there was no change whatever in the division—deeds which I feel satisfied will always be achieved by them while t<
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix G (search)
matter of history that the army of the Potomac was never in finer drill, or better discipline, or more thoroughly in fighting trim than it was when it fought at Gettysburg. So much to the credit of General Hooker. It is a matter of history that when the column of the rebel army was within a day's march of the capital of Pennsyout his line of marches in Maryland, he was directed by Hooker to keep well to the right in order to cover Baltimore, intending thereby to force Lee to fight at Gettysburg or thereabouts. So much to the credit of Hooker. It is a matter of history that Hooker had formed a general plan of battle: that his Chief of Staff had thatch commenced only about forty-eight hours after he assumed command of the Army of the Potomac, even upon the plans of another! Mr. Everett, in his oration at Gettysburg, did not fail to do Gen. Hooker justice; nor did Gen. Lee, the leader of the crestfallen and defeated rebel army. We regret the more, therefore, that the Gener
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 15 (search)
attack on General Meade, men- Tioned in letter of March 9, 1864. see page 176, Vol. II from Washington (special dispatch to the N. Y. Tribune) Washington, Monday, March 7, 1864. Gen. Meade and the battle of Gettysburg The points made before the War Investigating Committee against Gen. Meade, who is substantially on trial before this congressional Commission, by the testimony of Gens. Sickles and Doubleday, are, that he gave and promulgated an order to his army to retreat from Gettysburg at the close of the first day's fight, when his superior strength, his advantage of position, and the honor and interests of the country, required him to give battle; that, in the forenoon of the second day's fight—Thursday—he gave another order to retreat, but which was not promulgated in writing; that he had made no dispositions for battle that day, had no plan for fighting, and seemingly no purpose to fight, but that the battle was precipitated by Gen. Sickles, and forced on Meade in pa<
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