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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
two guns went up in the charge with the infantry. General Rains's brigade on the left, led by Colonel Walter Scott O'Kane, and Major Rainwater made a brilliant dash at the redoubt and battery which had been throwing on them for an hour or more from its position in an old field. Eight guns were captured along the line. The Federal troops being dislodged from the woods began forming in the fields and planted some new batteries back of the knobs in the rear. And now the fight grew furious. Gorham's battery could not hold its position, and fell back to its old place. Guibor planted his two guns directly in front of the tavern and opened at close quarters with grape and canister on the Federal line, in which great confusion was evident, as officers could be seen trying to rally and re-form their men. The entire Confederate line was charging up to the Elkhorn Tavern; Colonel Carr, the Federal cavalry commander, had withdrawn his command from the bench of the mountain on the Confede
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Pea Ridge, Ark. (search)
Green. Third Division, Col. John B. Clark, Jr.: 1st Infantry, Major Rucker (w); 2d Infantry, Col. Congreve Jackson; 3d Infantry, Major Hutchinson; 4th and 5th Infantry (consolidated), Col. J. A. Poindexter (w); 6th Infantry, Lieut.-Col. Peacher. Division loss: k, 11; w, 101; m, 35 = 147. Fifth Division, Col. James P. Saunders: detachments of infantry, cavalry, and Kelly's battery of artillery. Division loss: k, 9; w, 32 = 41. Sixth Division, Major D. H. Lindsay: detachments of infantry and Gorham's battery of artillery. Division loss: w, 13; m, 34 = 47. Seventh and Ninth Divisions, Brig.-Gen. D. M. Frost: detachments of infantry and cavalry and Guibor's and MacDonald's batteries of artillery; also included the Third Brigade of Volunteers given above. Eighth Division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Rains: Infantry under Col. William H. Erwin, Lieut.-Cols. John P. Bowman, A. J. Pearcy, and Stemmons; Bledsoe's battery, and Shelby's company of cavalry. Division loss: k, 2; w, 26 = 28. McCullo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Composition and losses of the Confederate army. (search)
Green. Third Division, Col. John B. Clark, Jr.: 1st Infantry, Major Rucker (w); 2d Infantry, Col. Congreve Jackson; 3d Infantry, Major Hutchinson; 4th and 5th Infantry (consolidated), Col. J. A. Poindexter (w); 6th Infantry, Lieut.-Col. Peacher. Division loss: k, 11; w, 101; m, 35 = 147. Fifth Division, Col. James P. Saunders: detachments of infantry, cavalry, and Kelly's battery of artillery. Division loss: k, 9; w, 32 = 41. Sixth Division, Major D. H. Lindsay: detachments of infantry and Gorham's battery of artillery. Division loss: w, 13; m, 34 = 47. Seventh and Ninth Divisions, Brig.-Gen. D. M. Frost: detachments of infantry and cavalry and Guibor's and MacDonald's batteries of artillery; also included the Third Brigade of Volunteers given above. Eighth Division, Brig.-Gen. James S. Rains: Infantry under Col. William H. Erwin, Lieut.-Cols. John P. Bowman, A. J. Pearcy, and Stemmons; Bledsoe's battery, and Shelby's company of cavalry. Division loss: k, 2; w, 26 = 28. McCullo
March 31. Captain Jabez C. Rich, of Gorham, Me., of the rebel marine corps, was arrested in that place to-day, and conveyed to Fort Preble by Provost-Marshal Elliott, under orders of the Secretary of War. He claimed to be a paroled prisoner.--The Legislature of Virginia passed a bill authorizing the impressment of the salt-works in Washington County, Va., to be worked on State account.--Major-General Herron was assigned to the command of the National army of the frontier.--A large Union meeting was held at Washington, D. C., at which speeches were made by Admiral Foote, Green Adams of Kentucky, Mayor Wallach, and others, and resolutions were adopted in support of the National Government and for the vigorous prosecution of the war against all traitors at home and abroad.--National Intelligencer. President Lincoln issued a proclamation declaring all commercial intercourse not licensed and conducted as provided by law between citizens of the States now in rebellion, and thos
present and absent. Infantry:    Burbridge's regiment590923  Campbell's battalion400585  Clark's battalion119158  Hughes' battalion148179  McCown's regiment476653  MacFarlane's regiment547822  Priest's regiment368453  Pritchard's regiment450754  Rosser's battalion281350 Cavalry:    Gates' regiment (dismounted)536777  Hill's company5171  McCulloch's regiment (dismounted)444476  Murphy's company100116  Reves' company5272 Artillery, batteries:    Bledsoe's5376  Clark's91104  Gorham's4350  Guibor's6980  Kelly's    Kneisley's    Landis'6269  Lucas'7072  MacDonald's100100  Teel's [Texas]    Wade's107116 Brig. Gen. M. Jeff. Thompson's brigade701910 Grand total4,9587,866 Dabney H. Maury, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, May 5, 1862. Maj. T. A. Washington, Assistant Adjutant-General, Richmond, Va.: Major: I have the honor to communicate, for the information of the commanding gener
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baxter, James Phinney, 1831- (search)
Baxter, James Phinney, 1831- Author; born in Gorham, Me., March 23, 1831; has been mayor of Portland, Me., several times; and is the author of British invasion from the North; Sir Ferdinando Gorges and his province of Maine, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Longfellow, Stephen 1775-1849 (search)
Longfellow, Stephen 1775-1849 Lawyer; born in Gorham, Me., June 23, 1775; father of Henry W. Longfellow; graduated at Harvard, and was admitted to the bar in 1801. In 1814 he was a delegate to the Hartford Convention, and was a member of Congress from 1823 to 1825. In 1834 he was president of the Maine Historical Society. He died in Portland, Me., Aug. 2, 1849.
ec. 1835. Some of the births and deaths in this paragraph are taken from Binney's Prentice Family. 26. Caleb, s. of Deac. Henry (13), m. Lydia, dau. of Deac. Samuel Whittemore, 17 Sept. 1744, and wid. Rebecca Rockwell 20 Dec. 1762. His chil. were Caleb, b. 17 Ap. and d. 14 Aug. 1745; Caleb, b. 14 Nov. 1746; Elizabeth, b. 24 Sept. 1748, m. Benajah Davenport, Jr., of Dorchester, 4 Oct. 1769; Samuel, b. 10 Feb. 1749-50, d. young; Samuel, b. 26 May 1753, grad. H. C. 1771, a trader in Gorham, Me. (his son William was father of Sargent S. Prentice, Esq., one of the most eloquent men of his age); William, b. 1 Dec. 1754, pub. Mary Gorham of Barnstable 10 Oct. 1778, a merchant, d. in Kentucky; Henry, b. 4 Feb. 1757, d. young; Lydia, b. 27 Jan. 1759, m. Sargent Smith of Gloucester; Henry, bap. 30 Dec. 1759, a saddler, d. unm. 1794. Caleb the f. is styled yeoman; in 1747 he bought of the assigns of Edward Pelham two and a half acres, lying between Harvard Square and Brattle, Palmer, a
ec. 1835. Some of the births and deaths in this paragraph are taken from Binney's Prentice Family. 26. Caleb, s. of Deac. Henry (13), m. Lydia, dau. of Deac. Samuel Whittemore, 17 Sept. 1744, and wid. Rebecca Rockwell 20 Dec. 1762. His chil. were Caleb, b. 17 Ap. and d. 14 Aug. 1745; Caleb, b. 14 Nov. 1746; Elizabeth, b. 24 Sept. 1748, m. Benajah Davenport, Jr., of Dorchester, 4 Oct. 1769; Samuel, b. 10 Feb. 1749-50, d. young; Samuel, b. 26 May 1753, grad. H. C. 1771, a trader in Gorham, Me. (his son William was father of Sargent S. Prentice, Esq., one of the most eloquent men of his age); William, b. 1 Dec. 1754, pub. Mary Gorham of Barnstable 10 Oct. 1778, a merchant, d. in Kentucky; Henry, b. 4 Feb. 1757, d. young; Lydia, b. 27 Jan. 1759, m. Sargent Smith of Gloucester; Henry, bap. 30 Dec. 1759, a saddler, d. unm. 1794. Caleb the f. is styled yeoman; in 1747 he bought of the assigns of Edward Pelham two and a half acres, lying between Harvard Square and Brattle, Palmer, a
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
e oppressed. Please give the love of all of us to her, and to C. and A., and assure them that we shall endeavor to keep up the reputation of our country for humanity. Yours always faithfully, Geo. Ticknor. To Mr. Charles S. Daveis. Boston, October 13, 1860. My dear Charles,—Since I wrote from the Glen, In the White Mountains. I have heard of you-until yesterday-only by accident. Our calculations for our tour in the Mountains were overrun by two days, so that, when we reached Gorham again, I had no time either to see Lady Head off for Quebec, or to stop a night in Portland and see you, both of which I much regretted. Since our nominal return to Boston, which was necessary to keep other engagements, we have been little at home. We made a visit directly to our kinsfolk in Berkshire, Hon. B. R. Curtis and his family. which had been promised three successive years; then we went to New York to buy carpets, missing Cogswell, or, as he pretends, avoiding him by a day; t
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