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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 116 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 22 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Missouri (United States) or search for Missouri (United States) in all documents.

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while their families were described crossing the distant hills towards the Missouri River. Colonel McPhail, with his regiment, was ordered to fall upon their of the e trail, still marked by robes and other articles, was followed towards the Missouri River. We camped, after a march of nearly twenty miles, on a small lake half anforced by another camp of Yanktonais and some Tetons from the west side of Missouri River. We captured a Teton boy, who had no gun, and was subsequently released at the Missouri River. This Teton and an old squaw were the only prisoners taken in battle or near a battle. The supplications for the life of the wretches, when theythat finished them. No more Indians were encountered until the banks of the Missouri were reached, the morning of the twenty-ninth. The Indians had made good use ements, with heavy loss, and driven them in confusion and dismay across the Missouri River, leaving behind them all their vehicles, provisions and skins designed for