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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 116 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 22 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Missouri (United States) or search for Missouri (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 58 results in 34 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
Arkansas, One of the Southwestern States; discovered by De Soto in 1541, who crossed the Mississippi near the site of Helena. It was next visited by father Marquette (q. v.) in 1673. It was originally a part of Louisiana, purchased from the French in 1803, and so remained until 1812, when it formed a part of Missouri Territory. It was erected into a Territory in 1819, with its present name, and remained under a territorial government until 1836, when a convention at Little Rock, its present capital, formed a State constitution. Its first territorial legislature met at Arkansas Post in 1820. On June 15, 1836, Arkansas was admitted into the Union as a State. In 1861 the people of Arkansas were attached to the Union, but, unfortunately, the governor and most of the leading politicians of the State were disloyal, and no effort was spared by them to obtain the passage of an ordinance of secession. For this purpose a State convention of delegates assembled at the capital (Littl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dupratz, Antoine Simon Le page, 1689-1775 (search)
Dupratz, Antoine Simon Le page, 1689-1775 Explorer; born in Tourcoing, France, in 1689; settled on the Mississippi River among the Natchez Indians in 1720. For eight years he explored the regions watered by the Missouri and Arkansas rivers. He published a History of Louisiana, or of the western parts of Virginia and Carolina. He died in Paris, France, in 1775.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Featherstonhaugh, George William 1780-1866 (search)
Featherstonhaugh, George William 1780-1866 Traveller; born in 1780; made geological surveys in the West for the United States War Department in 1834-35. Owing to his knowledge of North America he was appointed a commissioner by Great Britain to determine the northwestern boundary between the United States and Canada, under the Ashburton-Webster treaty. His publications include Geological report of the elevated country between the Missouri and Red rivers; Observations on the Ashburton treaty; Excursion through the slave States, etc. He died in Havre, France, Sept. 28, 1866.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fremont, John Charles 1813-1890 (search)
and his mother a Virginian. He was instructor in mathematics in the United States navy from 1833 to 1835. Engaged in surveying the Cherokee country in the winter of 1837-38, he began his famous explorations, first in the country between the Missouri River and the British possessions. He had been appointed second lieutenant of topographical engineers in July. In 1841 he married a daughter of Senator Thomas H. Benton, and in May, 1842, he began, under the authority of the government, the explodo of the Gulf of California; and on the other was the Wind River Valley, where were the heads of the Yellowstone branch of the Missouri. Far to the north we just could discover the snowy heads of the Trois Tetons, where were the sources of the Missouri and Columbia rivers; and at the southern extremity of the ridge the peaks were plainly visible, among which were some of the springs of the Nebraska or Platte River. Around us the whole scene had one main striking feature, which was that of te
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hart, Albert Bushnell 1854- (search)
niel Boone in 1769. A discoverer of the Mississippi. My wife and daughter, said he, being the first white women that ever stood on the banks of the Kentucke River. In 1803 to 1806, across the Mississippi Valley, all the way from Washington to the farthest wall of the Rocky Mountains, passed Lewis and Clark, first of white men to find the road from the waters of the Mississippi to the waters of the Columbia. On Aug. 12, 1805, they reached the point where one of the party bestrode the Missouri River, up which they had labored so many months, and just beyond was the long-sought western rim of the valley. From the year 1715, when France and England went mad over a Mississippi bubble, down to the present time, the Mississippi has been a household word throughout the civilized world. Ships of Marseilles, ships of Bordeaux, ships of Bremen, ships of Liverpool, set their course for the mouth of the Mississippi, that they may bring eager immigrants into the promised land; and the stoli
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Indians, American (search)
The Southern Sioux, who were seated in the country between the Platte and Arkansas rivers. The Sahaptins include the Nez Perces and Walla Wallas, extending from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific Ocean, in Oregon and Washington. Beyond these are the more powerful Chinooks, now rapidly melting away. They embraced numerous tribes, from the mouth of the Columbia River to the Grand Dalles. The Shoshones comprise tribes inhabiting the territory around the headwaters of the Columbia and Missouri rivers; the Comanches, extending from A group of educated Indians. the head-waters of the Brazos to those of the Arkansas; families in Utah and Texas, and several tribes in California. The Attakapas and Chitemachas, in Texas, have languages that enter into no known group. Condition of the Indians. According to the reports of the Indian Bureau, the Indian population in 1891 was 249,273, nearly all of whom were partially or absolutely under the control of the national government. Ther
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Internal improvements. (search)
a. All of these grants made in 1856 and 1857 were similar to that given to Missouri in 1852. July 1, 1862, the Union Pacific Railroad Company was created for the purpose of constructing and maintaining a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean. They were granted the right of way through the public lands to the extent of 200 feet in width on each side of the line of the road, together with the necessary ground for stations, buildings, etc. They were also grantees on each side of these roads. The term mineral land was construed not to mean coal or iron. By the same act a grant of 20 miles of land was made to the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad Company for the construction of a road from the Missouri River to some point not farther west than the one hundredth meridian west longitude, to connect with the Union Pacific road. March 3, 1864, a grant of land was made to the State of Kansas to assist in constructing railroads within its borders, a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jenkins, William Dunbar 1849- (search)
Jenkins, William Dunbar 1849- Civil engineer; born in Adams county, Miss., Sept. 19, 1849; was educated at military schools in France and Belgium; studied civil engineering in Lexington, Va., in 1869-71; and has since done much work in bridge-building. He was in charge of the construction of the Randolph bridge over the Missouri River, at Kansas, Mo., and was employed on the Mississippi levees. He has been chief engineer of railroads in the South and Southwest, and was also chief engineer of the Aransas Pass harbor and jetty works in Texas. In 1898-99 he was major of the Volunteer Engineer Corps, and chief engineer officer of the 1st Division of the 2d Army Corps. In 1887 he became a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
the country, and great commotion among the settlers in Kansas. On Jan. 29, 1861, Kansas was admitted into the Union as a State. During the war Kansas furnished to the National army more than 20,000 soldiers. It is very rapidly increasing in population and wealth. Its population in 1890 was 1,427,096; in 1900, 1,470,495. Much of the State is a fine grazing country, well supplied with rivers and watered by numerous creeks. State seal of Kansas. On its eastern border the navigable Missouri River presents a waterfront of almost 150 miles. It has a coal-bearing region which occupies the whole of the eastern part of the State, and embraces about 17,000 square miles. The climate of Kansas is beautiful and healthy, and probably no other Western State of the Union has so many bright, sunny days. The raising of cattle is a prominent industry. Kansas is a very attractive State for enterprising settlers, and promises to be one of the finest portions of the Union. In 1900 the aggregat
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lewis, Meriwether (search)
he country, will be a protection with all its subjects; and that from the minister of England will entitle you to the friendly aid of any traders of that allegiance with whom you happen to meet. The object of your mission is to explore the Missouri River, and such principal streams of it as, by its course and communication with the waters of the Pacific Ocean, whether the Columbia, Oregon, Colorado, or any other river, may offer the most direct and practicable water communication across the continent for the purposes of commerce. Beginning at the mouth of the Missouri, you will take observations of latitude and longitude at all remarkable points on the river, and especially at the mouths of rivers, at rapids, at islands, and other places and objects distinguished by such natural marks and characters, of a durable kind, as that they may with certainty be recognized hereafter. The courses of the river between these points of observation may be supplied by the compass, the log-li
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