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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), What the rebels said they captured. (search)
At this place (Centreville) our troops had the good luck to find a large table spread with a sumptuous dinner, and almost untouched, as the rout, which commenced about the fashionable hour for a dining feast, had left but poor stomachs for digesting rich food. A correspondent from Manassas has just shown me a number of bills of fare for the dinners to which McDowell had invited his friends to enjoy with him on the route to Richmond, indicating that they expected to repose a short time at Fairfax. Court House, Manassas, and other convenient localities on the way. The bills of fare are mostly in French, and quite costly as to the cuisine. Twenty-five baskets of champagne and a dozen of claret were also found at Centreville — the centre of good things ; and a soldier who was present has just informed me, that when our brave hungry boys arrived at the village and took possession, they at once commenced a sad havoc upon these delicious drinkables, during which a sprightly officer in
ctar and ambrosia in the old bucket, which was vigorously rolled up and down on its iron chain, they rested, washed, breathed long and well, and trudged on toward Fairfax. One poor fellow, a slender youth of eighteen, too tender altogether for a working army, panted up to the well and seemed too weak to hold himself up. I was sickevident from our soon overtaking our old friend of Co. H, 3d Regt., me. The road was about as sparingly sprinkled with stray soldiers as it was the other side of Fairfax, and in all we probably saw five hundred, not more, between the first panic in the road, and Alexandria. Many of these were lying in groups, asleep, by the roadst soldiers who reached Washington by this route. (The Arlington and Long Bridge road diverges some miles from Alexandria. Of the current that way — this side of Fairfax — we could not testify; but this is the nearest way.) We had thus walked between thirty-five and forty miles in the course of twenty-one hours; and Mr. T----se
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Incidents of the retreat after the panic was stopped. (search)
ctar and ambrosia in the old bucket, which was vigorously rolled up and down on its iron chain, they rested, washed, breathed long and well, and trudged on toward Fairfax. One poor fellow, a slender youth of eighteen, too tender altogether for a working army, panted up to the well and seemed too weak to hold himself up. I was sickevident from our soon overtaking our old friend of Co. H, 3d Regt., me. The road was about as sparingly sprinkled with stray soldiers as it was the other side of Fairfax, and in all we probably saw five hundred, not more, between the first panic in the road, and Alexandria. Many of these were lying in groups, asleep, by the roadst soldiers who reached Washington by this route. (The Arlington and Long Bridge road diverges some miles from Alexandria. Of the current that way — this side of Fairfax — we could not testify; but this is the nearest way.) We had thus walked between thirty-five and forty miles in the course of twenty-one hours; and Mr. T----se
had had five fresh regiments in addition to Col. Blenker's brigade, which, however, did not reach the field of battle in time to afford any relief, and an additional force of five or ten regiments with a battery behind Centreville on the road to Fairfax, and in the rear of the wagons, the field would have been saved, for there is no doubt the rebels were stunned by the force of our charges and the extent of their losses, which must have been comparatively much heavier than ours. This is almosthin my personal observation, sought by every possible effort to rally the men; that the very officer on horseback who brought us the message to Blenker, was afterwards overtaken by us, far ahead of the troops, riding leisurely to the rear on the Fairfax road. I confidently believe that there was a repulse, after the almost superhuman exertions of our men, who had been fighting on empty stomachs, by fresh cavalry; and I think it will be found that a retreat had been ordered. It was not a panic