hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

cond United States cavalry, sent on a scout, drove in the pickets and charged through Lieut.-Col. R. S. Ewell's camp, at Fairfax, between three and four in the morning. A lively skirmish ensued, forcing the Federals to pass around the village in retna infantry, about 575 strong, several companies of cavalry and two guns of Kemper's battery, marched from his camp near Fairfax on a reconnoissance to Dranesville, where he learned that several hundred of the enemy had that day come up the Leesburg. On July 14th, Colonel Davies, with the Fifteenth New York, made a reconnaissance from Alexandria 7 miles out on the Fairfax road, 10 miles on the Richmond, or Telegraph road, and to Mt. Vernon. Only a small picket was met on the Richmond road.d outpost, under Colonel Hunton, at Leesburg, watching the fords of the upper Potomac east of the Blue ridge; another at Fairfax, in direct observation of the Federal army at Washington, with detachments on the line of the railway toward Alexandria,
Chapter 10: Operations along the Potomac from First Manassas to battle of Leesburg. Soon after the retreat of McDowell from Bull run to Washington, Longstreet's brigade, with artillery and Stuart's cavalry, was advanced, first to Centreville, then to Fairfax, and later to Falls Church and Mason's, Munson's and Upton's hills, commanding positions in full view of Washington, but with orders, writes Longstreet, not to attempt to advance even to Alexandria. The Federal authorities soon threw a cordon of well-located, formidable and well-manned fortifications around the front of Washington and Alexandria, and heavy artillery guarded all approaches to the national capital. The Confederate cavalry was constantly at the front, but the infantry and artillery supports were frequently relieved. A single battery was allowed to Longstreet, and as that had to respond to calls in all directions, General Longstreet writes that he supplied the want of located batteries by collecting
the enemy were killed and 10 captured. On the 26th a squadron of Pennsylvania cavalry, on a reconnoissance to Vienna, was attacked by 120 men of the First North Carolina cavalry, under Col. Robert Ransom, and stampeded. Ransom reported the capture of 26 prisoners, and a considerable number of horses, sabers and carbines. The attention of the government was invited to these successful affairs by General Johnston. Skirmishes followed, of like character, near Dranesville on the 26th, near Fairfax on the 27th, and at Annandale, December 2d. Gen. S. G. French, stationed at Evansport, reported on December 15th that his position had been under fire from Federal batteries on the Maryland shore during the past three weeks. On December 20th Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, with a force comprising the Eleventh Virginia, Col. Samuel Garland; Sixth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Secrest; Tenth Alabama, Col. J. H. Forney, and First Kentucky, Col. T. H. Taylor, in all 1,600 infantry; Capt. A. S.
ond corps went into winter quarters, in Caroline county, in the forests just back from the front of the wooded bluffs of the Rappahannock, and Jackson established his headquarters at Moss Neck, near Fredericksburg, while Longstreet's corps occupied the left from the rear of Fredericksburg up the Rappahannock to the vicinity of Banks' ford, above Fredericksburg. Later in December, Stuart made a cavalry reconnoissance around Burnside's right and rear, to within a few mile of Washington and Fairfax and Occoquan. The larger portion of Longstreet's corps was sent south of the James, with its advance in the vicinity of Suffolk, to winter where subsistence was plentiful. The Federal army went into winter quarters along the line of the railway from Fredericksburg to Aquia creek, with its base of supplies at that Potomac landing, which was easily accessible by ship and steamer. Thus these two great armies, with their camp-fires in sight of each other, disposed themselves in winter quarte