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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 22 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 10 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 9 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers) 6 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various). You can also browse the collection for Troy (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Troy (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XII: The Poet rejoices for the favours he has received of his mistress. (search)
alls, I pass'd no ditch profound, Safe were my wars, and all without a wound. My only work a charming girl to gain; The pleasure well rewards the little pain. Ten years the Greeks did in one siege employ, But levell'd were, at length, the walls of Troy; What glory was there by th' Atrides won, So many chiefs before a single town! Not thus did I my pleasant toils pursue, And the whole glory to myself is due; Myself was horse and foot, myself alone The captain and the soldier was in one, And fough actions smile; I only owe my triumph to my care, And by my patience only won the fair. Nor was my cause of quarrel new; the same Set Europe and proud Asia in a flame. For Helen, ravish'd by the Dardan boy, Was the war wag'd that sunk the pride of Troy; The Centaurs double form'd, half man, half beast, Defil'd with horrid war the nuptial feast; Inflam'd by wine and woman's magic charms, They turn'd the jolly face of joy to arms. 'Twas woman urg'd the strife; a second fair Involv'd the Trojans in
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy VI: To a River, as he was going to his mistress. By Rhymer. (search)
e moon, In shorter journey would my job be done. Why rave I for what crack-brain'd bards devise, Or name their lewd unconscionable lies ? Good river, let me find thy courtesy, Keep within bounds, and mayst thou ne'er be dry. Thou canst not think it such a mighty boast, A torrent has a gentle lover cross'd. Rivers should rather take the lover's side, Rivers themselves love's wondrous power have tried. 'Twas on this score Inachus, pale and wan, Sickly and green, into the ocean ran ; Long before Troy the ten-years siege did fear, Thou, Xanthus, thou Neaera's chains didst wear; Ask Achelous who his horns did drub, Straight he complains of Hercules's club. For Calydon, for all Aetolia Was then contested such outrageous fray! It neither was for gold, nor yet for fee; Dejanira, it was all for thee. E'en Nile so rich, that rolls thro' sev'n wide doors, And uppish over all his country scours, For Asop's daughter did such flame contract, As not by all that stock of water slack'd. I might a hundr
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), Elegy XII: He complains that the praises he has bestowed on his mistress in his verses, have occasioned him many rivals. (search)
re to the public known, Why should I think she'd sell to me alone ? 'Twas I proclaim'd to all the town her charms, And tempted cullies to her venal arms; I made their way, I show'd them where to come, And there is hardly now a rake in Rome But knows her rates, and thanks my babbling muse: Her house is now as common as the stews; For this I'm to the muse oblig'd, and more For all the mischiefs envy has in store. This comes of gallantry, while some employ Their talents on the fate of Thebes and Troy, While others Caesar's godlike acts rehearse, Corinna is the subject of my verse. Oh, that I ne'er had known the art to please, But written without genius and success. Why did the town so readily believe My verse, and why to songs such credit give ? Sure poetry s the same it ever was, And poets ne'er for oracles did pass. Why is such stress upon my writings laid? Why such regard to what by me is said ? I wish the tales I've of Corinna told, Had been receiv'd as fables were of old; Of furious