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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 10: Thoreau (search)
h plumes itself upon its breadth, no slight effort is needed to picture the life of a typical New England village before the Transcendental movement had broken up the hard old Puritanic crust. It wa with an unaffected love of the classics. After a diatribe against the narrow religiosity of New England, he draws breath to praise the Ionian father of the rest, with the enthusiasm of Keats. The local religion. It is the obvious thing to rebel against. What Thoreau dissented from was New England Puritanism, as is plainly shown in Sunday of A Week. The atmosphere of that lost religion hanr the acquisition of useless things. By another paradox of his career, he freed himself from New England thrift by being still more thrifty. By denying himself and faring more scantily than his nei him; the rain does not wet, and the winter does not chill. There may be a thousand nooks in New England more beautiful than Walden, but they remain unknown, while the pine-clad slope which this str
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 12: Longfellow (search)
llows and his mother's people, the Wadsworths, were well-to-do, and they represented the best New England, particularly Massachusetts, traditions, which, with the spread of Unitarianism, were losing ailure, since Longfellow exhibited neither in it nor in later poems cast in similar form —The New England tragedies (1868), Judas MacCABAEUSabaeus (1872), and Michael Angelo (1883),—the slightest traes, however, have left behind a more negligible prose romance than the story of an impossible New England village which Longfellow published in 1849 under the title Kavanagh; A Tale. The end of thss Longfellow's other successful achievements in the same category because it is more racy of New England, fuller of humour, superior in movement and in characterization. It is less popular than Evato the twelve poems collected in Flower-de-luce (1867); it is more than should be said of The New England tragedies, the third part of Christus, consisting of John Endicott and Giles Cory of the Sale
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 13: Whittier (search)
many thousands of its sort that dotted the New England country-side, rearing in the old Puritan tronsciencea sake. The temperament of the New England Quaker was not unlike that of the New EnglaNew England Puritan. The one could be as cantankerous as the other, on occasion, but when the early Puritanbut vanished from American life, whether in New England or elsewhere. The home which Snow-Bound dech literary analogies, the Burns of his own New England country. From this time on, Whittier waschildhood he was steeped in the legendry of New England, its tales of Indian raids, of Quaker persef it belongs to the permanent literature of New England history and thought. The most important ti stranger in Lowell, The Supernaturalism of New England, Leaves from Margaret Smith's journal in thr of accepting too unreservedly the view of New England colonial life that the leaders of the Puritt his rhymes—good Yankee rhymes, but out of New England they would be cashiered, he once said of th[7 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 15: publicists and orators, 1800-1850 (search)
treasury; he was an administrator rather than a publicist or orator, but some of his pamphlets and reports were of marked ability. Roger Brooke Taney (1777-1864), secretary of the treasury under Jackson, and chief justice of the United States from 1836 to 1864, was a learned jurist, whose fame was clouded for the later part of his life by his opinion in the Dred Scott case. Josiah Quincy (1772-1864), an orator of no mean power, represented during the earlier part of his life the narrow New England Federalism which was so bitterly opposed to the politics of Jefferson and Madison. Edward Everett (1794-1865) occupied various public positions—member of Congress, governor of Massachusetts, minister to England, president of Harvard College. Although long active in political affairs he won chief destinction by lectures on literary subjects and by orations of an occasional character. In no other speeches of his generation, probably in no others in our whole history, do we find the same
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 16: Webster (search)
speech in which he commemorated Adams and Jefferson in 1826. He returned to the House of Representatives in 1823 and in 1827 entered the Senate, in which he served till 1841. Ever since 1800 Webster had been the exponent of a doctrine of nationalism which now made him the chief defender of the idea of union. His debate with Hayne of South Carolina in 1830, commonly called The Great Debate, is a classic statement of the doctrine and the idea. For twenty years Webster was the voice of New England. He failed of election as President, but he had a notable, if brief, career as secretary of state under Harrison and Tyler, 1841-43, during which he concluded with Great Britain the important Webster-Ashburton Treaty. Once more in the Senate after 1845, Webster opposed the annexation of Texas and the Mexican War. As the struggle over slavery grew more violent he turned to the side of Clay and in the famous Seventh of March Speech defended Clay's Compromise Bill, with the result that he
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 17: writers on American history, 1783-1850 (search)
saw the history of the country as a man of New England would see it. His own section bulked large ne years after Pitkin's book was published, New England found a still abler and more satisfying hishe kept true to his love for the history of New England. In 1858-64 he brought out in three volumes a History of New England during the Stuart Dynasty. It won instant recognition and the author fos success with two more volumes, History of New England from the Revolution of the 17th Century to ages and issued as a Compendious history of New England in four handy volumes. So far as the mere complete and sufficient history of colonial New England. He has not been careless or slothful. B, most of it given up to the records of the New England Confederation. The two volumes did not payl letters dealing with the early history of New England. They were published in a separate volume anning much greater enterprises. One was a New England man, a Harvard graduate, a minister of acce
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
Neither the reputation nor the libraries of New England could have spared them. The courtesy thaed by his generation, endowed with the best New England could give to a few of her sons, and with tre Boston metal in his mouth. In each case New England gave to her child a heritage of sturdy charrgy of the race was also in his blood and a New England strain well woven into the woof of his cons on Talvi's Geschichte der Colonisation von New England were scholarly and original. He had no des a trustworthy account of the spiritual state of New England. John Josselyn, who wrote New England'New England's Rareties (1672), declared that most of what he wrote was true; he admits that some things which htook on new life. It first found voice in New England, the section which was eventually to shuddellustrated fairly well the peculiarities of New England speech and manners, and doubtless had a greBoth were written by Asa Green (d. 1837), a New England physician, who moved to New York and establ[5 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
cal controversies, especially those over the Unitarian schism in New England, called forth a number of religious periodicals that are of impo was the most valuable organ of the best conservative thought in New England; and it continued its traditions until 1878, when it suffered a f habitat, and to some extent of ideals. Although the greater New England writers of the nineteenth century were well started on their care (1825-27), to which Longfellow was a frequent contributor, The New England magazine (Boston 1831-35), in which Holmes published two papers cals of the time was The Dial, published quarterly by a group of New England Transcendentalists from 1840 to 1844. Such an organ of the new sing but has come to recognize it as the best single exponent of New England Transcendentalism, and of the peculiar aspects of culture that aained contributions from all the leading anti-slavery writers of New England. Others of the better known annuals were The Amaranth, The Ch
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 21: Newspapers, 1775-1860 (search)
sessions. After a warm debate the resolution was withdrawn, never again to be revived, at a time when the taking of notes in the British Parliament was still forbidden. Partisan bitterness increased during the last decade of the century. New England papers were generally Federalist; in Pennsylvania there was a balance; in the West and South the anti-Federalist press predominated. Though the Federalists were vigorously supported by such able papers as Russell's Columbian Centinel in Bostocellence of its short, crisp, pithy editorial paragraphs and longer discussions, free from pedantry and heaviness, based always on fundamental ideas and principles, made the Republican widely known and respected. Its opinions soon reached all New England, and after the formation of the Republican party they extended far beyond the limits of any section. But in spite of the extent of its influence, the Republican held steadily to its purpose as a provincial newspaper; it told all the news, gav
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
four posthumously published volumes of Travels in New England and New York (1821-22). These record a series of e past; he had wished to know the manner in which New England appeared or to mine own eye would have appeared ek is far to seek. Now, in emulation of the early New England annalists, he chronicles a great storm or an egrelong in the world. His picture of the trim green New England landscape, with its white spires and prosperous vrk, and, generally speaking, of the world outside New England Congregationalism, all strengthen his conviction d to mark the formal beginning of Unitarianism in New England. The Rev. Joseph Buckminster (1751-1812) of Poteresting form. In Norwood, or village life in New England (1868), advertised as Mr. Beecher's only novel, Bken not as a novel but as a series of sketches of New England types, descriptions of New England scenery, and dNew England scenery, and discussions not too profound of topics in religion, politics, and esthetics, has distinct merit. This is much t
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