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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 426 414 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 135 135 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 124 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 116 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 113 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 86 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 58 34 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 48 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) or search for New Orleans (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 3.-attack on the defences of Mobile. (search)
ive this day. Some preliminary account of your operations had previously reached us through rebel channels. Again it is my pleasure and my duty to congratulate you and your brave associates on an achievement unequalled in our service by any other commander, and only surpassed by that unparalleled naval triumph of the squadron under your command in the spring of 1862, when, proceeding up the Mississippi, you passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and, overcoming all obstructions, captured New-Orleans, and restored unobstructed navigation to the commercial emporium of the great central valley of the Union. The Bay of Mobile was not only fortified and guarded by forts and batteries on shore, and by submerged obstructions, but the rebels had also collected there a formidable fleet, commanded by their highest naval officer — a former captain in the Union navy — who, false to the government and the Union, had deserted his country in the hour of peril, and levelled his guns against the f
ith the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; was in the action with the Chalmette batteette batteries; present at the surrender of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attack upsburgh, and was present at the surrender of New-Orleans. He was present at and assisted in the capVicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. es; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; the batteries below Vicksburgh; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. 22. James Smith, first, (Captain of Forecastle,) is recommendes; the rebel iron-clads and gunboats below New-Orleans; the batteries below Vicksburgh, present at the surrender of New-Orleans. Joined the Richmond in October, 1863. 24. James McIntosh (Captaiort Hudson; and present at the surrender of New-Orleans. 26. Thomas Atkinson (yeoman) is recomme[32 more...]
, off Brazos de Santiago, Texas, Nov. 2, 1863. Again an army of American soldiers is on Texas soil, and once more in the neighborhood of the almost sacred battle-fields of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma. The following account of the expedition from the time it left South-West Pass to the successful landing of troops on the Texan coast, at Brazos de Santiago, nine miles from the mouth of the Rio Grande del Norte, will be read with interest by all. An expedition was fitted out at New-Orleans under the command of Major-General Dana. General Banks and staff also accompanied it. Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, all went well, the vessels keeping in line at their proper distances; weather fine, sea a little rough. On Friday morning, October thirtieth, at half-past 4 o'clock, there was a sudden and great change. The weather, up to this time, (night and day,) had been uncomfortably hot, but at the hour mentioned a heavy norther struck us; the fleet could no longer be kept t
Doc. 7.-battle of Grand Coteau, La. also known as the battle of Bayou bourbeaux. Major-General Ord's report. headquarters Thirteenth army corps, New-Orleans, La., January 18, 1864. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant General U. S. A., Washington, D. C.: sir: I have the honor to inclose sub-reports, just received,Copy. W. H. Morgan, Major and Assistant-Adjutant-General. Official Copy. C. A Nichols, Assistant-Adjutant-General. Wisconsin State Journal account. New-Orleans, La., Nov. 9, 1863. I returned yesterday from Opelousas, and hasten to give you the details of a contest at Bayou Bourbeaux, about nine miles this side of thathe skirmish was over, and the forces returned to camp. As an election was to be held in the Twenty-third next day, I gave out tickets I had procured printed in New-Orleans; and Colonel Guppy had requested of General Burbridge lighter duty next day for his men, if possible, so as to allow of their voting and receiving their pay.
f other naval officers and men, were killed. The remainder of the expedition did not leave New-Orleans till December thirty-first, and arrived off Galveston on the second of January, the day afteraptured or destroyed by the enemy. Fortunately they did not attempt to land, and returned to New-Orleans in safety. It is proper to remark that this expedition was not contemplated or provided for General Schofield's troops against Little, Rock, and another under Generals Ord and Herron to New-Orleans, to reenforce General Banks for such ulterior operations as he might deem proper to undertakeVicksburgh, for reenforcements for this purpose. General Grant, it is understood, is sick in New-Orleans. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Major-General Hurlbut, Memphis. Headquarters of the army,he West, seemed entitled to this general command. But, unfortunately, he was at this time in New-Orleans, and unable to take the field. Moreover, there was no telegraphic communication with him, an
. Whipple, Assistant Adjutant-General Department of the Cumberland: sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith a list of all ordnance and ordnance stores captured from the enemy, together with a list of expenditures and losses by our own troops in the recent battle of Chattanooga. Captured from the enemy: cannon, field-guns, and howitzers. Smooth Bores.--Six-pounder guns, 8; twelve-pounder guns, light, confederate pattern, 13; twelve-pounder guns, model 1857, Leeds and Company, New-Orleans, 6; twelve-pounder field howitzers, 3. Total smooth bores, 30. Rifled Guns.--Three-inch, confederate pattern, 1; ten-pounder Parrott guns, model 1861, 4; six-pounder field, 2; six-pounder James, 1. Total rifled guns, 8. Twenty-four pound guns, 2. Total number of pieces captured, 40. Artillery carriages, 28; caissons, 26; battery wagons, 4; travelling forge, 1. A good many parts of harness were captured, but no complete sets; 2336 rounds of artillery ammunition; 6175 stand of sma
Doc. 47.-proclamation of General Banks, ordering an election in Louisiana. headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, January 11, 1864. To the People of Louisiana: I. In pursuance of authority vested in me by the President of the United States, and upon consultation with many representative men of different interests, being fully assured that more than a tenth of the population desire the earliest possible restoration of Louisiana to the Union, I invite the loyal citizens of the State, qualified to vote in public affairs, as hereinafter prescribed, to assemble in the election precincts designated by law, or at such places as may hereafter be established, on the twenty-second day of February, 1864, to cast their votes for the election of State officers herein named, namely, Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Secretary of State, Treasurer, Atttorney General, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Auditor of Public Accounts, who shall, when elected, for the time being, and u
Doc. 73.-labor in Louisiana. General Banks's orders. Hbadquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, February 8, 1864. General orders, No. 23: the following general regulations are published for the information and government of all interested in the subject of compensated plantation labor, public or private, during the present year, and in continuation of the system established January thirtieth, 1863: I. The enlistment of soldiers from plantations under cultivation in this department, having been suspended by order of the Government, will not be resumed except upon direction of the same high authority. II. The Provost-Marshal General is instructed to provide for the division of parishes into police and school districts, and to organize from invalid soldiers a competent police for the preservation of order. III. Provision will be made for the establishment of a sufficient number of schools, one at least for each of the police and school districts, for th
bestowed on aliens. Absenteeism would curse us with all its vices. Superadded to these, sinking us into a lower abyss of degradation, we would be made the slaves of our slaves, hewers of wood and drawers of water for those upon whom God has stamped indelibly the marks of physical and intellectual inferiority. The past of foreign countries need not be sought unto to furnish illustrations of the heritage of shame that subjugation would entail. Baltimore, St. Louis, Nashville, Knoxville, New-Orleans, Vicksburgh, Huntsville, Norfolk, Newbern, Louisville, and Fredericksburgh are the first fruits of the ignominy and poverty of Yankee domination. The sad story of the wrongs and indignities endured by those States which have been in the complete or partial possession of the enemy, will give the best evidence of the consequences of subjugation. Missouri, a magnificent empire of agricultural and mineral wealth, is to-day a smoking ruin and the theatre of the most revolting cruelties and
nd the next, while the task of taking Mobile is one which might be undertaken at any time, though it is unaccountably strange that it was not begun in December instead of May. As is well known, the column under General Franklin crossed from New-Orleans to Brashear City about the first instant, and thence took up the line of march along the Bayou Teche, substantially the same route pursued nearly a year ago, via Opelousas to, Alexandria. The forces under General A. J. Smith, from the departm and, it might be said also, never to less purpose. At the time of departure, the strength of the rebellion in the inland waters had been crushed. Its forts had been demolished at Henry, Donelson, Columbus, Island 10, Vicksburgh, Hudson, and New-Orleans, by the gallant Foote and Farragut, united with the army. Its fleet had been sunk by Ellet, Farragut, and Davis. All that remained to be extinguished was one insignificant fort at Gordon's Landing, and one ram and one gunboat on Red River.
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