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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 62: leaving Charlotte.—The rumors of surrender. (search)
at President Davis left Ninetysix Station by stage for Augusta, Ga.; another that he had an escort of three hundred cavalry, and would come the route by Abbeville. As all the above are reports, I know nothing positive of their reliability. The Newbury train is now one hour and a half behind time. If it arrives in time for the Abbeville train, I will add a postscript if there is anything new. If I can do anything for you, you have but to command me P. S. 3.30. The Newbury train is in. I sawNewbury train is in. I saw Mr. Fleetwood, from Columbia. He says he conversed with Colonel Urquhart, of the army, that the armistice is positively so, and he had seen orders to the Yankee raiders to that effect. He was told that President Davis was escorted by General Geary, and was on his way to Augusta, Ga. Very truly your obedient servant, A. A. Franklin Hill, Major First Georgia Regulars. A courier arrived with the news that General Johnston's army were engaged in the preliminary arrangements for surrend
Chapter 6: ecclesiastical history. The history of their church, in many of our earliest New England towns, was almost the history of their settlement. So early as 1634, our fathers procured a preacher, Mr. James Noyes, afterwards minister of Newbury. He was born in England in 1608, educated at Oxford, came to Boston in 1634, and was immediately called to preach at Mistic, which he did for nearly one year. He was much beloved and respected,--a very holy and heavenly-minded man. He was a man of singular qualifications, a reaching and ready apprehension, and a most profound judgment. He was courageous in dangers, and still apt to believe the best, and made fair weather in a storm. After he left Medford, the inhabitants received religious instructions from Rev. Mr. Wilson and Rev. Mr. Phillips; for, in the tax for the support of these gentlemen, Medford paid its share assessed by the General Court. These preachers were paid by six towns, and doubtless considered Medford as be
called doctor in the town records, May, 1724. The college at that time had not commenced the giving of medical degrees. He is called the first physician of Medford. During a short residence with his townsman and relative, Rev. John Tufts, at Newbury, he connected himself with the church there, and was recommended by that church to the one in Medford, May, 1734. To show how much he labored, how well he succeeded, and how truly he was loved, we quote here the following brief and discriminahe Annual Thanksgiving1794 On the Day of the National Thanksgiving1795 On the Death of a Child, killed by a Gun1797 Before the Annual Convention of the Congregational Ministers of Massachusetts1798 At the Ordination of Rev. Leonard Woods, at Newbury1798 The Devil let Loose; or, the Woe occasioned by his wrathful Appearance,--a Sermon on Fast Day1799 On the Death of General Washington1799 Dudlean Lecture; Validity of Presbyterian Ordination,--delivered in the Chapel of Harvard College1802
ok. Frederick I., b. Oct. 31, 1828; d. April 16, 1830. Frederick P., b. Oct. 24, 1831; d. May 23, 1851. Georgianna I., b. Sept. 8, 1836. Winslow W., b. Oct. 2, 1840. William E., b. Mar. 19, 1845., mentioned below. [Vide History of Newbury. ]  2 Hepzibah had, by Gardner Fifield,-- George G., b. Oct. 27, 1824; m. Sarah E. Richardson. James F., b. Sept. 15, 1826; m. Tamzay Holbrook. Frederick I., b. Oct. 31, 1828; d. April 16, 1830. Frederick P., b. Oct. 24, 1831; d.Ann Dudley, the poetess. Mercy Cotton was b. Nov. 3, 1666; and d. June 18, 1715. The issue by this marriage was--  15Cotton, b. June 11, 1686; d. July 28, 1686.  16Mary, b. July 4, 1687; d. Mar. 8, 1688.  17John, b. May 5, 1689; minister at Newbury, 1714.  18Samuel, b. Aug. 22, 1691; d. Oct. 20, 1692.  19Dorothy, b. May 5, 1693; d. Sept. 10, 1693.  20Mercy, b. June 20, 1695; d. Aug. 19, 1697.  21Dorothy, b. Mar. 27, 1697; d. Nov. 29, 1697.  22Mercy, b. Oct. 27, 1698; m. John Bradstr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate treasure-statement of Paymaster John F. Wheless. (search)
charge of their own officials or clerks, who continued with the Treasury Department in order to have the protection of its escort. In order to avoid the frequent repetition of Treasury Department, I beg simply to refer to it by the expression we. After remaining three or four days in Danville, we proceeded to Greensboro, N. C.; remained there a few days, and leaving about $40,000 of the silver there, moved to Charlotte. Staid there nearly a week, and went to Chester, S. C., thence to Newbury, and thence to Abbeyville, where we remained a few days, and then moved to Washington, Ga., where we took the cars for Augusta. We reached the Georgia railroad at Barnett's station, and I there met friends returning from the vicinity of Atlanta who informed me that they had seen in the Federal papers that Generals Sherman and Johnston had agreed upon an armistice. I immediately communicated the information to Captain Parker, and assured him of my confidence in the reliability of the repor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Coffin, Joshua 1792-1864 (search)
Coffin, Joshua 1792-1864 Antiquarian; born in Newbury, Mass., Oct. 12, 1792; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1817; an earnest abolitionist; helped to establish the New England Anti-Slavery Society in 1832; published The history of ancient Newbury. He died in Newbury, Mass., June 24, 1864. Coffin, Joshua 1792-1864 Antiquarian; born in Newbury, Mass., Oct. 12, 1792; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1817; an earnest abolitionist; helped to establish the New England Anti-Slavery Society in 1832; published The history of ancient Newbury. He died in Newbury, Mass., June 24, 1864. Coffin, Joshua 1792-1864 Antiquarian; born in Newbury, Mass., Oct. 12, 1792; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1817; an earnest abolitionist; helped to establish the New England Anti-Slavery Society in 1832; published The history of ancient Newbury. He died in Newbury, Mass., June 24, 1864.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth 1807-1882 (search)
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth 1807-1882 Poet; born in Portland, Me., Feb. 27, 1807; was a descendant of William Longfellow, of Newbury, Mass., and on his mother's side of John Alden, a passenger on the Mayflower; and graduated at Bowdoin College in 1825. He studied law a short time, when he received the appointment of Professor of Modern Languages in his alma mater. To better fit himself for the duties, he spent three years and a half in Europe, and assumed his office in 1829. In 1835 he was chosen Professor of Belles-Lettres in Harvard, and again he made a pilgrimage to Europe to make himself familiar with Continental literature. For nearly twenty years he was a professor in Harvard College, retiring from that post in 1854, and pursued the task of literary composition in his fine old mansion at Cambridge, which Washington had used for his headquarters in 1775-76. He first wrote timidly for literary periodicals, and the first seven articles in a collection published in 1857 were
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
om the towns, before the meeting of the court, the first instance of caucus on record......May 6, 1635 Concord first settled......1635 Richard Dummer founds Newbury......1635 Roger Williams advocates the inviolable freedom of faith. He appears before the magistrates to defend it......April, 1635 Rev. John Avery drowned while on his way to Marblehead from Newbury......Aug. 14, 1635 Roger Williams is sentenced to depart out of the jurisdiction of the colony within six weeks, but owing to clamor of a stanch minority is permitted to remain until spring......October, 1635 John Winthrop, the younger, Hugh Peters, and Henry Vane arrive at Boston.on......April 14, 1668 Title of reverend first applied to the clergy of New England......1670 Two young married Quaker women walk naked through the towns of Newbury and Salem, in emulation of the prophet Ezekiel, as a sign of the nakedness of the land......1671 George Fox, founder and apostle of the Quakers, comes to Rhode
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whittier, John Greenleaf 1807-1892 (search)
ld Buffum, and Nathan Winslow, men well known in the antislavery agitation, were conspicuous members. Vermont sent down from her mountains Orson S. Murray, a man terribly in earnest, with a zeal that bordered on fanaticism, and who was none the more genial for the mob-violence to which he had been subjected. In front of me, awakening pleasant associations of the old homestead in Merrimac valley, sat my first schoolteacher, Joshua Coffin, the learned and worthy antiquarian and historian of Newbury. A few spectators, mostly of the Hicksite division of Friends, were present, in broad brims and plain bonnets, among them Esther Moore and Lucretia Mott. Committees were chosen to draft a constitution for a national anti-slavery society, nominate a list of officers, and prepare a declaration of principles to be signed by the members. Dr. A. L. Cox, of New York, while these committees were absent, read something from my pen eulogistic of William Lloyd Garrison; and Lewis Tappan and Amos
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Woodbridge. John 1614-1691 (search)
Woodbridge. John 1614-1691 Clergyman; born in Stanton, England, in 1614; emigrated to the Massachusetts colony in 1634; ordained minister of Andover, Oct. 24, 1645. Two years later he returned to England where he remained until 1663, when he again removed to Massachusetts. He died in Newbury, Mass.. July 1, 1691.
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