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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 18: the Capital secured.--Maryland secessionists Subdued.--contributions by the people. (search)
Massachusetts men; now she was preserved to the uses of the Government, for whose sovereignty she had gallantly fought, by the hands of Massachusetts men. This, said General Butler, in an order thanking the troops for the service, is a sufficient triumph of right; a sufficient triumph for us. By this the blood of our friends, shed by the Baltimore mob, is so far avenged. We will add, that the Constitution was soon afterward taken to New York; and when the naval school was removed to Newport, Rhode Island, she became a school-ship there. In assisting to get out the Constitution, the Maryland grounded on a sand-bank. The suspected captain was confined, and the vessel was put under the management of seamen and engineers from among the Massachusetts troops. The composition of this regiment was very remarkable. It contained men skilled in almost every trade and profession; and Major Winthrop, who went out with the New York Seventh Regiment, was nearly right when he said, that if t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 21: beginning of the War in Southeastern Virginia. (search)
e, 500. slaves pronounced contraband of War Newport Newce fortified, 501. attack on Pig Point B which he has seen, he finds the point called Newport Neuse, which, he argues, is only another way ment, to occupy and fortify the promontory of Newport-Newce, where the United States steamer Harriecourse of a few days a battery was planted at Newport-Newce that commanded the ship-channel of the roe, and the threatening aspect of affairs at Newport-Newce, which Greble was rendering impregnableruder was preparing to attempt the seizure of Newport-Newce and Hampton, and confine Butler to Fortieutenant-Colonel Washburne had advanced from Newport-Newce, followed by Bendix with his Germans, athe watchword. Butler's aid, who was sent to Newport-Newce with orders for the advance, had neglecred men had drawn one of Greble's cannon from Newport-Newce, and two mules the other. With the latabsence of these, was to hold his position at Newport-Newce and the village of Hampton. On the 1st[8 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 23: the War in Missouri.-doings of the Confederate Congress. --Affairs in Baltimore.--Piracies. (search)
ommercial marine. Report of the Secretary of the Navy, July 4, 1861. The Naval School and public property at Annapolis, in Maryland, had been removed to Newport, Rhode Island, because it was unsafe, in the state of public affairs in Maryland, to continue the school there. Fort Adams, near Newport, was tendered by the War Departavy, July 4, 1861. The Naval School and public property at Annapolis, in Maryland, had been removed to Newport, Rhode Island, because it was unsafe, in the state of public affairs in Maryland, to continue the school there. Fort Adams, near Newport, was tendered by the War Department for the temporary accommodation of the school. Navy, July 4, 1861. The Naval School and public property at Annapolis, in Maryland, had been removed to Newport, Rhode Island, because it was unsafe, in the state of public affairs in Maryland, to continue the school there. Fort Adams, near Newport, was tendered by the War Department for the temporary accommodation of the school.