Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Newport (Rhode Island, United States) or search for Newport (Rhode Island, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Fort, (search)
ongest defensive works in the United States; near Brenton Cove, 3 1/2 miles from the city of Newport, R. I. For several years the War Department has been engaged in providing for the most thorough fo resist hostile attack. Two of these batteries were planned to be erected at Dutch Island and Fort Adams. At both of these points there were already torpedo casements. The new Latter at Fort Adams Fort Adams was designed to assist in fortifying the main entrance to Narraganset Bay, while the one at Dutch Island would aid in resisting the approach of an enemy through what is called West Passage. Fort AdamFort Adams mounts 460 guns, and besides being a work of protection for the city and harbor of Newport, it also protects the United States torpedo station on Goat Island, and the training station for naval apprity and harbor of Newport, it also protects the United States torpedo station on Goat Island, and the training station for naval apprentices and the Naval War College, both on Coasters Harbor Island.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), America, discoverers of. (search)
overed and crossed the Mississippi, and penetrated the country beyond. This was the last attempt of the Spaniards to make discoveries in North America before the English appeared upon the same field. It is claimed for Giovanni da Verrazano, a Florentine navigator, that he sailed from France with four ships, in 1524, on a voyage of discovery, and that he traversed the shores of America from Florida to Nova Scotia. He is supposed to have entered Delaware Bay and the harbors of New York. Newport, and Boston, and named the country he had discovered New France. Jacques Cartier discovered the gulf and river St. Lawrence in 1534, and, revisiting them the next year, gave, them that name, because the day when he entered their waters was dedicated to St. Lawrence. In 1576 Sir Martin Frobisher went to Greenland and Labrador, and coasting northward discovered the bay that bears his name. Huguenot adventurers from South Carolina, floating on the ocean helplessly, were picked up, taken to
wed $200 bounty for each recruit, and the States made large additional offers; but the real amount was small, for at that time the Continental paper money had greatly depreciated. It was found necessary to replenish the regiments by drafts from the militia. The whole force of the American army, exclusive of a few troops in the Southern department, consisted, late in the spring of 1779, of only about 8,600 effective men. At that time the British had 11,000 at New York and 4,000 or 5,000 at Newport, besides a considerable force in the South. In 1780 a committee of Congress, of which General Schuyler was chairman, were long in camp, maturing, with Washington, a plan for another reorganization of the army. Congress agreed to the plan. The remains of sixteen additional battalions were to be disbanded, and the men distributed to the State lines. The army was to consist of fifty regiments of foot, including Hazen's, four regiments of artillery, and one of artificers, with two partisan
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Averill, William woods, 1832- (search)
and first struck the Virginia and Tennessee Railway at Salem, on the headwaters of the Roanoke River, where he destroved the station-house, rolling-stock, and Confederate supplies. Also, in the course of six hours his troops tore up the track, heated and ruined the rails, burned five bridges, and destroyed several culverts over the space of 15 miles. This raid aroused all the Confederates of the mountain region, and seven separate commands were arranged in a line extending from Staunton to Newport to intercept the raider. He dashed through this line at Covington in the face of some opposition, destroyed the bridges behind him, and one of his regiments, which had been cut off from the rest, swam the stream and joined the others, with the loss of four men drowned. Averill captured during the raid about 200 men. My command, he said in his report (Dec. 21, 1863), has marched, climbed, slid, and swam 340 miles since the 8th inst. He reported a loss of six men drowned, five wounded, and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bache, Alexander Dallas, 1806- (search)
d States Military Academy with high honor in 1825, receiving the appointment of lieutenant of engineers, and remaining in the academy a while as assistant professor. Two years he was under Colonel Totten in the construction of military works in Newport, where he married Miss Fowler, who, as his wife, was his great assistant in astronomical observations. He resigned from the army in 1827, and from that time until 1832 he was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania. Ardently devoted to sities conferred Alexander Dallas Bache. upon him the honorary degree of Ll.D. He published several scientific essays; was a member of the Light-house Board; a regent of the Smithsonian Institution, and active in various public labors. Dr. Bache bequeathed $42,000 to the Academy of Natural Science in Philadelphia, for the promotion of researches in physical and natural science, by assisting experimenters and observers. He died in Newport, R. I., Feb. 17, 1867. See coast and Geodetic survey.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berkeley, George, 1684-1753 (search)
for establishing a college in the Bermudas for the instruction of pastors for the colonial churches and missionaries for the Indians. He resigned his offices to become rector of the projected college at a salary of $500 a year. The House of Commons authorized the appropriation of a portion of the money to be obtained from the sale of lands in St. Kitt's (St. Christopher's), which had been ceded to England for the establishment of the institution. With these assurances Berkeley went to Newport, R. I. (1729), bought a farm and built a house, intending to invest the college funds, when received, in American lands, and then to make arrangements for a supply of pupils. He had just married, and brought his bride with him. The scheme for the college failed for lack of government co-operation after the death of the King, who favored it. In 1734 Berkeley was made Bishop of Cloyne, which place he held for almost twenty years. He gave to Yale College his estate in Rhode Island, known as White
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brenton, William, 1666-1674 (search)
Brenton, William, 1666-1674 Royal governor; born in England; was governor of Rhode Island in 1666 under the charter from Charles II., and was one of the original nine proprietors of Rhode Island. Brenton's Point and Brenton's Reef in Narraganset Bay were named after him. He died in Newport, R. I., in 1674.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Callender, John 1706-1748 (search)
Callender, John 1706-1748 Historian; born in Boston, Mass., in 1706; graduated at Harvard College in 1723; pastor of the First Baptist Church in Newport, R. I., in 1731-48. On March 24, 1738, he delivered a public address entitled An Historical discourse on the Civil and religions affairs of the colony of Rhode Island and Providence plantations, from the first settlement to the end of the first century. For more than 100 years this was the only history of Rhode Island. He also collected astor of the First Baptist Church in Newport, R. I., in 1731-48. On March 24, 1738, he delivered a public address entitled An Historical discourse on the Civil and religions affairs of the colony of Rhode Island and Providence plantations, from the first settlement to the end of the first century. For more than 100 years this was the only history of Rhode Island. He also collected a number of papers treating of the history of the Baptists in America. He died in Newport, R. I., Jan. 26, 1748.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
is 31,09111,98319,108 Rockford, Ill. 31,05123,5847,467 Taunton, Mass.31,03625,4485,588 Canton, O 30,66726,1894.478 Butte, Mont30,47010,72319,747 Montgomery, Ala30,34621,8838,463 Auburn, N. Y.30,34525,8584,487 East St. Louis, Ill.29,65515,16914,486 Joliet, Ill.29,35323,2646,089 Sacramento, Cal29,28226,3862,896 Racine, Wis 29,10221,0148,088 La Crosse. Wis 28.89525,0903,805 Williamsport, Pa 28,75727,1321,625 Jacksonville. Pa 28,42917,20111,228 Newcastle, Pa28,33911,60016,739 Newport, Ky 28.30124,9183,383 Oshkosh. Wis28,28422.8365,448 Noonsocket. R. I.28,20420,8307,374 Pueblo. Col 28,15724,5583,599 Atlantic City, N. J.27,83813.05514,783 Passaic, N. J.27,77713,02814,749 Bay City, Mich.27,62827.839*211 Fort Worth. Tex26.68823,0763,612 Lexington, Ky26,36921,5674,802 Gloucester. Mass.26,12124,6511,470 South Omaha, Neb26.0018,06217,939 New Britain. Conn 25,99816,5199.479 Council Bluffs, Ia.25,80221.4744,328 Cedar Rapids, Ia 25,65618,0207,636 Easton, Pa25,23
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Champlin, Stephen 1789- (search)
Champlin, Stephen 1789- Naval officer; born in South Kingston, R. I., Nov. 17, 1789; went to sea when sixteen years old, and commanded a ship at twenty-two. In May, 1812, he was appointed sailing-master in the navy, and was first in command of a gunboat under Perry, at Newport, R. I., and was in service on Lake Ontario in the attacks on Little York (Toronto) and Fort George, in 1813. He joined Perry on Lake Erie, and commanded the sloop-of-war Scorpion in the battle on Sept. 10, 1813, firing the first and last gun in that action. He was the last surviving officer of that engagement. In the following spring, while blockading Mackinaw with the Tigress, he was attacked in the night by an overwhelming force, severely wounded, and made prisoner. His wound troubled him until his death, and he was disabled for any active service forever afterwards. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., Feb.
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