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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
ncluded his speech to Satan and is turning to leave him. It is a winged, heaven-born Achilles. The subject was suggested to Greenough by Washington Allston, years ago. The statue is about three or four feet high; but Greenough means to make one as large as the Apollo Belvedere. He has also done a beautiful little bas-relief for Mr. Salisbury,—the angel telling St. John not to address his prayers to him but to God; and is now engaged on a bas-relief for Miss Gibbs, to be put in a church at Newport; also busts of Franklin, of Marquis Capponi, &c. I have seen a good deal of Powers. Hiram Powers, 1805-73. He was born in Vermont; removed to Cincinnati; went to Italy in 1837; exhibited his Eve in 1838; and soon after executed the Greek Slave. Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 276-294. He is very pleasant and agreeable. His busts are truly remarkable, close likenesses without coarseness or vulgarity,—without Frazeeism.I asked Greenough if he thought Powers could make a young Augustus.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
ional chances will be up. To Hillard, then at Woods' Hole, he wrote, Aug. 5:— This goes from Court Street,—my first lines from that street. . . . On Saturday, in the midst of rain, we went to Nahant, where we had a very pleasant dinner with Prescott, who regretted much that you could not come. General Miller dined with us, and was as agreeable and sterling as ever. This visit of General Miller to Nahant is mentioned in Prescott's Life, p. 171. Lieber is here still; he leaves for Newport on Friday. He is at the office from morning till night, and the evenings we pass together till very late. I like him more and more. His conversation is full and teeming with striking thought and abundance of illustration from all sources. Very few people in the world are his superiors. The testiness of character I pardon to the exile. We cannot have people with intellects and characters of unmixed goodness, free from all human frailties. . . . On Monday I received a beautiful letter
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
nder of the Somers has a sequel. Sumner was at Saratoga in August, 1851, after his election to the Senate, but before taking his seat. John Slidell, brother of Mackenzie, later a Senator from Louisiana, and afterwards a conspicuous partisan of the Rebellion, was a guest at the same hotel. On being introduced, he treated Sumner with marked reserve, and declined an invitation to a dinner to which both were invited by a mutual friend. Later in the month, he wrote to Sumner, who had gone to Newport, a note of explanation, expressing gratitude for the chivalrous and zealous advocacy of his brother, but at the same time embarrassment in maintaining relations of intercourse with one so pronounced in hostility to his section,—referring to Sumner's avowed purpose to exclude in his region the class to which he [Slidell] belonged from the courtesies of social life and the common rites of humanity. This was probably an allusion to Sumner's widely read speech at Fanueil Hall of Nov. 6, 1850,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
eptember became his brother Albert's guest at Newport,—his first visit to that resort. Here, rides sad message abruptly terminated his visit at Newport, that his sister Mary was near her end. No bey the way of the North River and New York, to Newport, where I shall breathe still another atmosphe mountains, I count upon a visit to Albert at Newport, which I shall reach by the way of the North breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, r; then to Stockbridge, back to Lenox, then to Newport. Write me and send me letters to Lenox. Telo Peleg Chandler; and tell him to write me at Newport a gossipy letter, containing such matters as passed the day. To Dr. Howe he wrote from Newport, Sept. 30:— Most tardily I return to you.me one letter more. To George S. Hillard. Newport, Tuesday, Oct. 1, 1844. my dear Hillard,—Yrrow with resignation. I was recalled from Newport, where I was passing my time in exercise in t<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Wednesday fore, Aug. 28. (search)
The result of his examination has restored my confidence in myself. He thought that no physician could be confident that there was any thing on my lungs; if there was any thing it was very slight, and said he should not have suspected it if some of my family were not afflicted with poor lungs. He said he was most pleasantly disappointed by the result of the examination, and that his anxiety was removed. So when you see me, invigorated by the breezes of Berkshire and the balmy breaths of Newport, expect to find me in my pristine strength, rejoicing in your return, looking with joy upon all the signs of your happiness. I am vexed that I have filled this letter with so much about myself. It is a perpetual ego. When I read your arrival in the newspaper, I shall send you a note of my health and whereabouts. Perhaps then you will find time to cheer me with a letter. My sister Mary still lingers at Waltham, enjoying occasional drives, but fading gradually. Adieu, with my welcome
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
nd salutary influence your effort will exert,—all combine to swell the debt of gratitude which you have earned from your fellow-citizens. That debt, I well know, will be repudiated by many, and very partially paid by others; but you will find a rich reward in your consciousness of well-doing, in the esteem of men whose esteem is valuable, and, above all, in the approbation of Him whose favor is better than life. Daniel Lord of New York, the eminent lawyer, and Rev. Charles T. Brooks of Newport, while concurring with the spirit of the oration, suggested limitations to its doctrines. John G. Whittier, who was from this time Sumner's constant friend, wrote from Amesbury, Sept. 11, 1845:— Respected friend,—I thank thee from my very heart for thy noble address. Its truths are none the less welcome for the beautiful drapery in which they are clothed. It will do great good. I would rather be the author of it than of all the war eloquence of Heathendom and Christendom combine<