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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
ginning the story of her life it seems proper to dwell at some length on the ancestors whose memory she cherished with such reverence. The name of Ward occurs first on the roll of Battle Abbey: Seven hundred and ten distinguished persons accompanied William of Normandy to England, among them Ward, one of the noble captains. Her first known ancestor, John Ward, of Gloucester, England, sometime cavalry officer in Cromwell's army, came to this country after the Restoration and settled at Newport in Rhode Island. His son Thomas married Amy Smith, a granddaughter of Roger Williams. Thomas's son Richard became Governor of Rhode Island and had fourteen children, among them Samuel, who in turn became Governor of the Colony, and a member of the Continental Congress. He was the only Colonial governor who refused to take the oath to enforce the Stamp Act. In 1775, in the Continental Congress, he was made Chairman of the Committee of the Whole, which from 1774 to 1776 sat daily, working
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
n the skill of gardening. Year after year in the savage island of Newport, where labor is hard to hire, I have passed summers ungladdened byrting spirit ; Redeeming love ; My heavenly home, etc., etc. At Newport, in 1831, she wrote the following:-- Morning Hymn Now I see the round. It was after this illness that Julia Ward first went to Newport. A change of air was prescribed for the children, and they were pthe farmhouse of Jacob Bailey, two or three miles from the town of Newport. Here they spent a happy summer, to be followed by many others. rds were permitted under Mr. Ward's roof. The year of the first Newport visit, 1832, was also the terrible cholera year. Uncle Ben Cutlerthere at an upper window, peering at him as at a strange sight. Newport took the alarm, and forbade steamboats from New York to land theirra? Answer: Because they have no bowels. Grandma Cutler was at Newport with the Wards and Francises, and trembled for her only son. She i
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: the corner --1835-1839; aet. 16-20 (search)
was over. The matter was never mentioned again. The Wards continued to pass the summers at Newport, but no longer at good Jacob Bailey's farmhouse. Mr. Ward had bought a house in town, which a rule relaxed somewhat, and the pretty house became the centre of a sober hospitality. Indeed, Newport was a sober place in those days. There were one or two houses where dancing was allowed, but tleasure of its garden planted with roses and gooseberry bushes by Billy Bottomore, a quaint old Newport sportsman, who took the boys shooting, and showed them where to find plover, woodcock, and snipe. Billy Bottomore passed for an adopted son of old Father Corne, another Newport character of those days. This gentleman had come from Naples to Boston, toward the end of the eighteenth century, a twinkle to her eye, and we never tired of hearing how he told her, There is a single sister in Newport, a sempstress, to whom I have offered matrimony, but she says, No. The single sister finally
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
hanks for thy volume! I rec'd it some days ago, but was too ill to read it. I glanced at Rome, Newport and Rome, and they excited me like a war-trumpet. To-day, with the wild storm drifting withoutt has been told elsewhere Letters and Journals of Samuel Gridley Howe. how she once, being in Newport and waked from sleep by some noise, called to him; and how he, in Boston, heard her, and asked,en Peace, and far dearer to her, was the summer home at Lawton's Valley, in Portsmouth, Near Newport, of which it is really a suburb. Rhode Island. Here, as at South Boston, the Doctor's genius fuisite, the most beautiful I ever saw. The straw is very handsome, and will make me the envy of Newport, next summer. The worsted work appears to me rich and quaint, and shall be made up as soon as her sister Annie October, 1854. I will tell you how I have been living since my return from Newport. I get up at seven or a little before, and am always down at half-past for breakfast. After
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: little Sammy: the Civil War 1859-1863; aet. 40-44 (search)
copy of the little volume; it was seized at Havana by the customs house officers, and confiscated as dangerous and incendiary material. On her return, our mother was asked to write regularly for the New York Tribune, describing the season at Newport. This was the beginning of a correspondence which lasted well into the time of the Civil War. She says of it:-- My letters dealt somewhat with social doings in Newport and in Boston, but more with the great events of the time. To me the expNewport and in Boston, but more with the great events of the time. To me the experience was valuable in that I found myself brought nearer in sympathy to the general public, and helped to a better understanding of its needs and demands. To her sister Annie Sunday, November 6, 1859. The potatoes arrived long since and were most jolly, as indeed they continue to be. Did n't acknowledge them 'cause knew other people did, and thought it best to be unlike the common herd. Have just been to church and heard Clarke preach about John Brown, whom God bless, and will bless!
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: no. 13
Chestnut Street
, Boston 1864; aet. 45 (search)
had written two-thirds of Proteus. As soon as I was able, I wrote the remaining portion which treats of affection. At Newport I wrote my Introductory Lecture on How Not to Teach Ethics, then Duality of Character, then my first Lecture on Religion. Returned from Newport, I wrote my second and third essays on Religion. I read the six essays of my first course to a large circle of friends at my own house, not asking any payment. This done, I began to write a long essay on Polarity which is ker and my dear Sammy were blended in it. Soon after this the seabirds of Muscovy departed; then came the flitting to Newport, and a summer of steady work. Read Paul in the Valley. Thought of writing a review of his first two epistles from o write a poem for the occasion. This she did joyfully, composing and arranging the stanzas mostly in the train between Newport and Boston. On the day of the celebration, she took an early train for New York: Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes was on the
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the wider outlookv1865; aet. 46 (search)
e under the privation of the Valley. I feel this, and resolve to do well, but nature will suffer. That place has been my confidante,--my bosom friend,--intimate to me as no human being ever will be — dear and comforting also to my children.... June 11 ....Thought of a good text for a sermon, In the world ye shall have tribulation, the scope being to show that our tribulation, if we try to do well, is in the world, our refuge and comfort in the church. Thought of starting a society in Newport for the practice of sacred music, availing ourselves of the summer musicians and the possible aid of such ladies as Miss Reed, etc., for solos. Such an enterprise would be humanizing, and would supply a better object than the empty reunions of fashion .... Wednesday, June 21. Attended the meeting at Faneuil Hall, for the consideration of reconstruction of the Southern States. Dana made a statement to the effect that voting was a civic, not a natural, right, and built up the propriety o
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: concerning clubs 1867-1871; aet. 48-52 (search)
After extreme depression, I begin to take heart a little. Almighty God help me! Greek lesson — rehearsal in the evening — choral symphony and Lobgesang. During the summer of 1868 she had great pleasure in reading some of her essays at Newport, in the Unitarian Church. She notes in her Reminiscences that one lady kissed her after the reading, saying, This is the way I want to hear women speak ; and that Mrs. P-- S-- , on hearing the words, If God works, madam, you can afford to work not wish the public present, even by its attorney, the reporter. The three following years were important ones to the Howe family. Lawton's Valley was sold, to our great and lasting grief: and — after a summer spent at Stevens Cottage near Newport — the Doctor bought the place now known as Oak Glen, scarce half a mile from the Valley; a place to become only less dear to the family. No. 19 Boylston Place was also sold, and he bought No. 32 Mount Vernon Street, a sunny, pleasant house who
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 16: the last of Green Peace 1872-1876; aet. 53-57 (search)
eek, She had a voice that made me meek, I had to listen when she did speak-- Cookery bookery, oh! My husband comes, a saucy elf, And eyes the saucepan on the shelf; Says he, “Why don't you cook yourself?” Cookery bookery, oh! Chorus: Sing, saucepan, range, and kitchen fire! Sing, coals are high and always higher! Sing, crossed and vexed, till you expire! Cookery bookery, oh! Jocosa Lyra! one chord of its gay music suggests another. It may have been in this summer that she wrote The Newport song, which also has its own lilting melody. Non sumus fashionabiles: Non damus dapes splendides: But in a modest way, you know, We like to see our money go; Et gaudeamus igitur, Our soul has nought to fidget her! We do not care to quadrigate On Avenues in gilded state: No gold-laced footmen laugh behind At our vacuity of mind: But in a modest one-horse shay, We rumble, tumble as we may, Et gaudeamus igitur, Our soul has nought to fidget her! When estivation is at end, We've had our
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
travel and pleasure, her delight in the soft Newport climate was deeper than ever. She always fel. She used to say that the soft, cool air of Newport smoothed out the tired, tangled nerves like aoodwin of Harvard were spending the season at Newport: A little band of us combined to improve the ciation known as the Town and Country Club of Newport. I felt the need of upholding the higher socminance of the gay and fashionable element in Newport society, she said:-- But some things can be done as well as others. Newport... has also treasures which are still unexplored. . . The mdwood Library, one of the old institutions of Newport. The Town and Country Club was succeeded bage. My sermon at the Unitarian Church in Newport. A most unexpected crowd to hear me. Sept0 a Channing memorial celebration was held in Newport, for which she wrote a poem. She sat on the of beautiful roses ... September 18. Left Newport to attend Saratoga Convention, being appointe[6 more...]
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