hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 23 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 30 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 26 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 23 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 15 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 14 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 11 1 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 31 results in 28 document sections:

1 2 3
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Herbert Baxter, 1850- (search)
Adams, Herbert Baxter, 1850- Historian and editor; born in Shutesbury, Mass., April 16, 1850; was graduated at Amherst College in 1872 and at Heidelberg University in 1876: and in 1878-81 was successively Associate Professor and Professor of History in Johns Hopkins University; also in 1878-81 lecturer in Smith College, Northampton, Mass. He had been for many years secretary of the American Historical Association and editor of its Reports, editor of the Johns Hopkins studies in Historical and political Science, and editor of Contributions to American educational history, published by the United States Bureau of Education. His other publications include a large number of educational and historical monographs.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, William, 1710-1780 (search)
College in 1820-39. He was the author of Junius unmasked; a supplement to Webster's dictionary; Psalms and hymns; Memoirs of Dr. Eleazer Wheelock and of Dr. John Codmand: a discourse at the close of the second century of the settlement at Northampton, Mass.; Wunaissoo, or the vale of Housatonnuck, a poem; Christian sonnets: poems of Nazareth and the cross: sacred songs; and numerous pamphlets, and contributed biographical articles to Sprague's Annals of the American pulpit. He also prepared toirs of Dr. Eleazer Wheelock and of Dr. John Codmand: a discourse at the close of the second century of the settlement at Northampton, Mass.; Wunaissoo, or the vale of Housatonnuck, a poem; Christian sonnets: poems of Nazareth and the cross: sacred songs; and numerous pamphlets, and contributed biographical articles to Sprague's Annals of the American pulpit. He also prepared the first edition of the American biographical and Historical dictionary. He died in Northampton, Mass., July 16, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bancroft, George, (search)
rman universities, and received, at Gottingen, the honorary degree of Doctor of Philosophy when he was only twenty years of age. He resided some time in Berlin in the society of distinguished scholars, and on his return home, in 1822, he became a tutor of Greek in Harvard University. He published a volume of poems in 1823. and in 1824 a translation of Heeren's Politics of ancient Grecce. In 1823, in conjunction with J. G. Cogswell, he established the celebrated Round Hill School, at Northampton, Mass. While in the German universities, Mr. Bancroft studied with avidity whatever was taught in them, but made history a specialty. His chief tutors there were Heeren. Eichhorn, and Blumenbach. At Berlin he became intimate with Wilhelm von Humboldt and other eminent scholars and philosophers. At Heidelberg he spent some time in the study of history with Schlosser; and in Paris he made the acquaintance of Alexander von Humboldt, Cousin, and others. At Rome he formed a friendship with Ch
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colleges for women. (search)
n of women exclusively there were 145 colleges and seminaries authorized to confer degrees, having 2,441 professors and instructors, 20,548 students and $3,236,416 in total income. The institutions exclusively for women, organized on the general basis of college requirements, were divided into two classes. The first comprised the following: Mills College, in Mills College Station, Cal.; Rockford College, Rockford, Ill.; Women's College, Baltimore, Md.; Radcliffe, in Cambridge; Smith, in Northampton; Mount Holyoke, in South Hadley; Wellesley, in Wellesley—all in Massachusetts; Wells, in Aurora; Elmira, in Elmira: Barnard, in New York City; and Vassar, in Poughkeepsie—all in New York; Bryn Mawr, Bryn Mawr, Pa.; and Randolph-Macon Women's College, Lynchburg, Va. These colleges had 543 professors and instructors, 4,606 students, seventeen fellowships, 254 scholarships, $6,390,398 invested in grounds and buildings, $4,122,473 invested in productive funds, and $1,244,350 in total income.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cutter, Charles A. 1837- (search)
Cutter, Charles A. 1837- Librarian; born in Boston, March 14, 1837; graduated at Harvard in 1855; has been connected with the Harvard College and the Boston Athenaeum libraries; appointed librarian of the Forbes library, Northampton, Mass., in 1894. He is author of Rules for a dictionary catalogue; The expansive classification, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dearborn, Henry, 1751- (search)
Dearborn, Henry, 1751- Military officer; born in Northampton, N. H., Feb. 23, 1751; became a physician, and employed his leisure time in the study of military science. At the head of sixty volunteers he hastened to Cambridge on the day after the affair at Lexington, a distance of 65 miles. He was appointed a captain in Stark's regiment, participated in the battle of Bunker Hill, and in September following (1775) accompanied Arnold in his expedition to Quebec. He participated in the siege of Quebec, and was made prisoner, but was paroled in May, 1776, when he became major of Scammel's New Hampshire regiment. He was in the battles of Stillwater and Saratoga in the fall of 1777, and led the troops in those engagements—in the latter as lieutenant-colonel. He was in the battle of Monmouth, was in Sullivan's campaign against the Indians in 1779, and in 1781 was attached to Washington's staff as deputy quartermastergeneral, with the rank of colonel. In that capacity he served in the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dwight, Theodore, 1764-1846 (search)
Dwight, Theodore, 1764-1846 Journalist; born in Northampton, Mass., Dec. 15, 1764; was a grandson of the eminent theologian Jonathan Edwards; became eminent as a lawyer and political writer; was for many years in the Senate of Connecticut; and in 1806-7 was in Congress, where he became a prominent advocate for the suppression of the slave-trade. During the War of 1812-15 he edited the Mirror, at Hartford, the leading Federal newspaper in Connecticut; and was secretary of the Hartford convention (q. v.)in 1814, the proceedings of which he published in 1833. He published the Albany Daily Advertiser in 1815, and was the founder, in 1817, of the New York Daily Advertiser, with which he was connected until the great fire in 1835, when he retired, with his family, to Hartford. Mr. Dwight was one of the founders of the American Bible Society. He was one of the writers of the poetical essays of the Echo in the Hartford Mercury. He was also the author of a Dictionary of roots and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dwight, Timothy 1752-1817 (search)
Dwight, Timothy 1752-1817 Born in Norwich, Conn., Nov. 16, 1828; graduated at Yale in 1849; tutored at Yale 1851-55; Timothy Dwight. Professor of Sacred Literature and New Testament Greek at Yale, 1858-86; president of Yale University, 1886-99, when he resigned the office. President Dwight was one of the American committee on Revision of the Bible from 1878 till 1885. Educator; born in Northampton, Mass., May 14, 1752; graduated at Yale College in 1769, and was a tutor there from 1771 to 1777, when he became an army chaplain, and served until October, 1778. During that time he wrote many popular patriotic songs. He labored on a farm for a few years, preaching occasionally, and in 1781 and 1786 was a member of the Connecticut legislature. In 1783 he was a settled minister at Greenfield and principal of an academy there; and from 1795 until his death was president of Yale College. In 1796 he began travelling in the New England States and in New York during his college
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Edwards, Jonathan, 1703- (search)
Edwards, Jonathan, 1703- Theologian; born in East Windsor, Conn., Oct. 5, 1703; graduated at Yale College in 1720, having begun to study Latin when he was six years of age. He is said to have reasoned out for himself his doctrine of free-will before he left college, at the age of seventeen. He began preaching to a Presbyterian congregation before he was twenty years old, and became assistant to his grandfather, Rev. Mr. Stoddard, minister at Northampton, Mass., whom he succeeded as pastor. He was dismissed in 1750, because he insisted upon a purer and higher standard of admission to the Jonathan Edwards. communion-table. Then he began his missionary work (1751) among the Stockbridge Indians, and prepared his greatest work, on The freedom, of the will, which was published in 1754. He was inaugurated president of the College of New Jersey, in Princeton, Feb. 16, 1758, and died of small-pox, March 22, 1758. He married Sarah Pierrepont, of New Haven, in 1727, and they became
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Edwards, Pierrepont, 1750-1826 (search)
Edwards, Pierrepont, 1750-1826 Jurist; born in Northampton, Mass., April 8, 1750; the youngest son of Jonathan Edwards, Sr.; graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1768. His youth was spent among the Stockbridge Indians, where his father was missionary, and he acquired the language perfectly. He became an eminent lawyer; espoused the cause of the patriots, and fought for liberty in the army of the Revolution. He was a member of the Congress of the Confederation in 1787-88, and in the Connecticut convention warmly advocated the adoption of the national Constitution. He was judge of the United States District Court in Connecticut at the time of his father's death. Mr. Edwards was the founder of the Toleration party in Connecticut, which made him exceedingly unpopular with the Calvinists. He died in Bridgeport, Conn., April 5, 1826.
1 2 3