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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Caulkins, Frances Mainwaring 1796-1869 (search)
Caulkins, Frances Mainwaring 1796-1869 Author; born in New London, Conn., in 1796; was highly educated; and was the author of A history of Norwich, Conn.; A history of New London, Conn., etc. She died in New London, Conn., Feb. 3, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chester, Joseph Lemuel 1821-1882 (search)
Chester, Joseph Lemuel 1821-1882 (pen name Julian Cramor), antiquarian; born in Norwich, Conn., April 30, 1821; removed to London, England, in 1858, and devoted himself to the history and genealogy of the early settlers in New England. His publications include Educational laws of Virginia; The personal narrative of Mrs. Margaret Douglas; John Rogers (with a genealogy of the family), etc. He died in London, England, May 28, 1882.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Church, Benjamin 1639-1718 (search)
ntinental Congress, and he was dismissed from his post of chief director of the general hospital. He was arrested and tried by a court-martial at Cambridge on a charge of holding a criminal correspondence with the enemy. He was convicted (Oct. 3), and imprisoned at Cambridge. On Nov. 7 the Congress ordered him to be close confined, without the use of pen, ink, or paper; and that no person be allowed to converse with him, except in the presence and hearing of a magistrate of the town or the sheriff of the county where he shall be confined, and in the English language, until further orders from this or a future Congress. He was so confined in the jail at Norwich, Conn. In May, 1776, he was released on account of failing health, and sailed for the West Indies in a merchant vessel. He and the vessel were never heard of afterwards. Benjamin Church was the first traitor to the republican cause in America. He was well educated, and a writer in prose and verse of considerable ability.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dodge, Grenville Mellen, 1831- (search)
Dodge, Grenville Mellen, 1831- Military officer; born in Danvers, Mass., April 12, 1831; educated at Partridge's Military Academy, Norwich, Conn., and became a railroad surveyor in Illinois and Iowa and westward to the Rocky Mountains. He was sent to Washington in 1861 to procure arms and equipments for Iowa volunteers, and became colonel of the 4th Iowa Regiment in July. He commanded a brigade on the extreme right at the battle of Pea Ridge, and was wounded. For his services there he was made brigadier-general. He was appointed to the command of the District of the Mississippi in June, 1862. He was with Sherman in his Georgia campaign, and was promoted to major-general. He finally commanded the 16th Corps in that campaign, and in December, 1864, he succeeded Rosecrans in command of the Department of Missouri. In 1867-69 he was a member of Congress from Iowa, and subsequently was engaged in railroad business.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dwight, Timothy 1752-1817 (search)
Dwight, Timothy 1752-1817 Born in Norwich, Conn., Nov. 16, 1828; graduated at Yale in 1849; tutored at Yale 1851-55; Timothy Dwight. Professor of Sacred Literature and New Testament Greek at Yale, 1858-86; president of Yale University, 1886-99, when he resigned the office. President Dwight was one of the American committee on Revision of the Bible from 1878 till 1885. Educator; born in Northampton, Mass., May 14, 1752; graduated at Yale College in 1769, and was a tutor there from 1771 to 1777, when he became an army chaplain, and served until October, 1778. During that time he wrote many popular patriotic songs. He labored on a farm for a few years, preaching occasionally, and in 1781 and 1786 was a member of the Connecticut legislature. In 1783 he was a settled minister at Greenfield and principal of an academy there; and from 1795 until his death was president of Yale College. In 1796 he began travelling in the New England States and in New York during his college
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gilman, Daniel Coit 1831- (search)
Gilman, Daniel Coit 1831- Educator; born in Norwich, Conn., July 6, 1831; graduated at Yale University in 1852; and continued his studies in Berlin. In 1856-72 he served as librarian, secretary of the Sheffield Scientific School, and Professor of Physical and Political Geography at Yale University; in 1872 became president of the University of California, where he remained until 1875, when he was chosen president of Johns Hopkins University, which had just been founded. In 1893-99 he was president of the American Oriental Society; in 1896-97 a member of the United States commission on the boundary-line between Venezuela and British Guiana, and in 1897 a member of the commission to draft a new charter for the city of Baltimore.. In 1901 he resigned the presidency of the university. He has written Life of James Monroe; University problems; Introduction to De Tocqueville's Democracy Daniel Coit Gilman. in America; and many reports and papers.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Government, instrument of. (search)
rencester, 1; Herefordshire, 4; Hereford, 1; Leominster, 1; Hertfordshire, 5; St. Alban's, 1; Hertford, 1; Huntingdonshire, 3; Huntingdon, 1; Kent, 11; Canterbury, 2; Rochester, 1; Maidstone, 1 ; Dover, 1; Sandwich, 1; Queenborough, 1; Lancashire, 4; Preston, 1; Lancaster, 1; Liverpool, 1; Manchester, 1; Leicestershire, 4; Leicester, 2; Lincolnshire, 10; Lincoln, 2; Boston, 1; Grantham, 1; Stamford, 1; Great Grimsby, 1; Middlesex, 4; London, 6; Westminster, 2; Monmouthshire, 3; Norfolk, 10; Norwich, 2; Lynn-Regis, 2; Great Yarmouth, 2; Northamptonshire, 6; Peterborough, 1; Northampton, 1; Nottinghamshire, 4; Nottingham, 2; Northumberland, 3; Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1; Berwick, 1; Oxfordshire, 5; Oxford City, 1; Oxford University, 1; Woodstock, 1; Rutlandshire, 2; Shropshire, 4; Shrewsbury, 2; Bridgnorth, 1; Ludlow, 1; Staffordshire, 3; Lichfield, 1; Stafford, 1; Newcastle-under-Lyne, 1; Somersetshire, 11; Bristol, 2; Taunton, 2; Bath, 1; Wells, 1; Bridgewater, 1; Southamptonshire, 8; Win
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huntington, Ebenezer 1754-1834 (search)
Huntington, Ebenezer 1754-1834 Military officer; born in Norwich, Conn., Dec. 26, 1754; graduated at Yale College in 1775, and joined the patriot army as lieutenant in Wyllys's regiment. He served under Heath, Parsons, and Watts, and commanded the regiment of the latter in Rhode Island in 1778 as lieutenantcolonel. At Yorktown he commanded a battalion of infantry, and served on General Lincoln's staff until the end of the war, when he was made a general of the Connecticut militia. Huntint army as lieutenant in Wyllys's regiment. He served under Heath, Parsons, and Watts, and commanded the regiment of the latter in Rhode Island in 1778 as lieutenantcolonel. At Yorktown he commanded a battalion of infantry, and served on General Lincoln's staff until the end of the war, when he was made a general of the Connecticut militia. Huntington was named by Washington for brigadier-general in 1798. In 1810-11 and 1817-19 he was a member of Congress. He died in Norwich, June 17, 1834.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huntington, Jedediah 1743-1813 (search)
Huntington, Jedediah 1743-1813 Military officer; born in Norwich, Conn., Aug. 4, 1743; brother of the preceding; graduated at Harvard College in 1763; was an active Son of Liberty; joined the army at Cambridge, April 26, 1775; was made brigadier-general in May, 1777; joined the Continental army near Philadelphia in the fall of 1777; and in 1778 was on the court-martial that tried General Lee. After the war he held several civil offices, among them collector of customs at New London, which he filled during four administrations. General Huntington was a member of the first board of foreign missions. He died in New London, Sept. 25, 1813.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huntington, Samuel 1731-1796 (search)
Huntington, Samuel 1731-1796 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Windham, Conn., July 3, 1731; was brought up on his father's farm and learned the cooper's trade. In 1753 he began to study law; in 1758 settled in the town of Norwich, which he represented in the General Assembly in 1764; in 1765 was made king's attorney; and in 1775 was a member of the upper house in the Connecticut Assembly; was a member of the Continental Congress in 1776-83; president of it in 1779-81; jusettled in the town of Norwich, which he represented in the General Assembly in 1764; in 1765 was made king's attorney; and in 1775 was a member of the upper house in the Connecticut Assembly; was a member of the Continental Congress in 1776-83; president of it in 1779-81; judge of the Supreme Court of Connecticut in 1774-84, and in the latter year was chiefjustice of that court. He was lieutenantgovernor of Connecticut in 1785, and governor in 1786-96. He died in Norwich, Conn., Jan. 5, 1796.
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