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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sigourney, Lydia Huntley (Mrs. 1791-1865 (search)
Sigourney, Lydia Huntley (Mrs.) 1791-1865 Author; born in Norwich, Conn., Sept. 1, 1791; educated in Norwich and Hartford; and attained a high reputation as a writer. Her publications include Traits of the aborigines of America (a poem); Sketch of Connecticut forty years since; Pocahontas and other poems; Scenes in my native land, etc. She died in Hartford, Conn., June 10, 1865. Sigourney, Lydia Huntley (Mrs.) 1791-1865 Author; born in Norwich, Conn., Sept. 1, 1791; educated in Norwich and Hartford; and attained a high reputation as a writer. Her publications include Traits of the aborigines of America (a poem); Sketch of Connecticut forty years since; Pocahontas and other poems; Scenes in my native land, etc. She died in Hartford, Conn., June 10, 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Slater, John F. 1815-1884 (search)
Gilman, ex-president of Johns Hopkins University, as president; Chief-Justice Fuller, as vicepresident; Morris K. Jesup, as treasurer; J. L. M. Curry, as secretary and general manager; and Bishops Potter and Galloway, and Messrs. William E. Dodge, William A. Slater, John A. Stewart, Alexander E. Orr, and William H. Baldwin, Jr. The fund is a potential agency in working out the problem of the education of the negro, and over half a million of dollars has already been expended. By the extraordinary fidelity and financial ability of the treasurer, the fund, while keeping up annual appropriations, has increased to $1,500,000. Schools established by States, denominations, and individuals are helped by annual donations. Among the most prominent are the Hampton Normal and Industrial; the Spelman, the Tuskegee, and schools at Orangeburg, S. C.; Tongaloo, Miss.; Marshall, Tex.; Raleigh, N. C.; New Orleans; the Meharry College at Nashville, etc. Mr. Slater died in Norwich, Conn., May 7, 1884.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Torpedoes. (search)
ip. Finally boats were sent out as lighters, and when the first barrel of flour was removed the explosion took place. A volume of fire shot up from the Eagle fully 200 feet in height, and a shower of pitch and tar fell on the deck of the Ramillies. the Eagle and the first lieutenant and ten men of the Ramillies were blown into atoms, and some of the occupants of boats near were fatally injured. This was followed by an attempt to explode a torpedo under the Ramillies. A citizen of Norwich, Conn., acquainted with Bushnell's torpedo, invented a submarine boat, in which he voyaged under water at the rate of 3 miles an hour. Three times he went under the Ramillies, and on the third occasion had nearly fastened the torpedo to the ship's bottom, when the breaking of a screw baffled the attempt. He was discovered, but escaped. A fisherman of Long Island, named Penny, made attempts on the Ramillies with a torpedo in a whale-boat, and Hardy was kept continually on the alert. He kept
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trumbull, Jonathan 1710-1785 (search)
College in 1759. When the Revolutionary War broke out, he was an active member of the Connecticut Assembly, and its speaker. From 1775 to 1778 he was paymaster of the Northern army; and in 1780 he was secretary and first aide to Washington, remaining in the military family of the commander-in-chief until the close of the war. He was a member of Congress from 1789 to 1795; speaker from 1791 to 1795; United States Senator in 1795-96; lieutenant-governor of Connecticut in 1796; and governor from 1797 until his death in Lebanon, Aug. 7, 1809. Librarian; born in Norwich, Conn., Jan. 23, 1844; received an academic education; member of the Connecticut Historical Society; president of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. He is the author of The Lebanon War office; The defamation of Revolutionary patriots: a vindication of General Israel Putnam; Joseph Trumbull, first commissary-general of the Continental army; The share of Connecticut in the Revolution, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Uncas, 1588-1682 (search)
Uncas, 1588-1682 Mohegan chief; born in the Pequot Settlement, Conn., about 1588; was originally a Pequot sachem, but about 1635 he revolted against Sassacus and Uncas's monument. gathered a band of Indians who were known by the name of Mohegans, the ancient title of his nation. He joined the English in their war with the Pequots in 1637, and received for his services a portion of the Pequot territory. When the war was over, Uncas shielded many of the Pequots from the wrath of the English, and incurred the enmity of the colonists for a time; but the white people soon gave him their confidence, and treated him with so much distinction that jealous Indians tried to assassinate him. For this treachery Uncas conquered one of the sachems in Connecticut, and in 1643 he overpowered the Narragansets and took Miantonomoh prisoner. He died in what is now Norwich, Conn., in 1682. See Miantonomoh.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
n League organized in London......July 13, 1898 United States and Canadian joint high commission meet in Quebec......Aug. 23, 1898 John Hay appointed Secretary of State......Sept. 30, 1898 Battle-ship Illinois launched at Newport News......Oct. 4, 1898 United States Supreme Court decdies Joint Traffic Association case against the railroads......Oct. 24, 1898 The captured Spanish cruiser Infanta Maria Theresa abandoned in a gale......Nov. 1, 1898 David A. Wells dies at Norwich, Conn.......Nov. 5, 1898 General elections result in a small Republican majority in the next House of Representatives......Nov. 8, 1898 Gen. Don Carlos Buell dies at Louisville, Ky.......Nov. 19, 1898 Provision made for a national exposition of American products in the city of Philadelphia......Dec. 21, 1898 General Woods succeeds General Brooke in Cuba......1899 John Russell Young, librarian of Congress, dies at Washington, D. C.......Jan. 17, 1899 The American flag raised at
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut, (search)
endence in 1776. He was elected governor annually until 1784. The name Brother Jonathan, humorously bestowed upon him by General Washington, has been applied to the United States.] Eliphalet Dyer, Roger Sherman, and Silas Deane elected at Norwich to the first Continental Congress......June 6, 1774 Israel Putnam, of Pomfret, Conn., hastens to Boston on hearing of the battle of Lexington; arrives......April 21, 1775 [Riding on one horse 100 miles in eighteen hours.] Col. Samuel H.apher, born in 1798, dies at Stratford......July 30, 1872 State constitution amended; all sessions of the General Assembly, from May, 1875, to be held at Hartford......Oct. 7, 1873 Ex-Gov. and United States Senator W. A. Buckingham dies at Norwich......Feb. 4, 1875 State constitution amended: Tuesday after first Monday in November made general election day; Wednesday after first Monday in January the day of meeting of General Assembly......Oct. 2, 1875 Orris S. Ferry, United States
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vermont, (search)
e agricultural school at Burlington, chartered 1791, opened......1800 Steamboat The Vermont launched at Burlington by John and James Winans......1809 Flag-ship Saratoga, of twenty-six guns, and several small vessels, built upon Otter Creek during the winter of 1813-14, under Thomas Macdonough, engage in the battle of Plattsburg and Lake Champlain; Americans victorious......Sept. 11, 1814 President James Monroe makes a tour through Vermont......1817 Norwich University founded at Norwich......1819 Resolutions of the Vermont legislature presented in the United States Senate, declaring slavery a moral and political evil, and that Congress has the right to prohibit its extension......Dec. 9, 1820 General Lafayette lays the corner-stone of the new university building at Burlington, to replace that destroyed by fire in 1824......June 29, 1825 Act for the establishment of common schools......1827 Anti-masonic governor, William A. Palmer, elected......1831 House of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ward, James Harman 1806- (search)
Ward, James Harman 1806- Naval officer; born in Hartford, Conn., in 1806; was educated at Norwich Military Academy and Trinity College; entered the navy in 1823, and rose to commander in 1858. He lectured on gunnery, and urged the establishment of a naval school. In May, 1861, he was placed in command of the Potomac flotilla; silenced the batteries at Aquia Creek, and in an attack upon a battery upon Mathias Point was mortally wounded by a Minie ball, June 27, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wells, David Ames 1828-1898 (search)
Wells, David Ames 1828-1898 Economist; born in Springfield, Mass., June 17, 1828; graduated at Williams College in 1847 and at the Lawrence Scientific School 1851; appointed assistant professor in the last institution; chairman of a commission to consider the best way to raise money by taxation for the needs of the government in 1866; special commissioner of revenue in 1866-70; and became a member of the board of arbitration for railroads in 1879. He was a voluminous writer on economic subjects. His publications include Our burden and strength; The creed of free-trade; Production and distribution of wealth; Why we trade and how we trade; The silver question, or the dollar of the fathers vs. The dollar of the Sons; Report of the United States revenue commission; Our merchant marine: how it rose, increased, became Great, declined, and decayed; Relation of tariff to wages, David Ames Wells. etc. He died in Norwich, Conn., Nov. 5, 1898.
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