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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 147 37 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 14 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 14 2 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 14 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 2 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The miraculous victory atchieved by the English Fleete, under the discreet and happy conduct of the right honourable, right prudent, and valiant lord, the L. Charles Howard, L. high Admirall of England, &c. Upon the Spanish huge Armada sent in the yeere 1588. for the invasion of England, together with the wofull and miserable successe of the said Armada afterward, upon the coasts of Norway , of the Scottish Westerne Isles, of Ireland , of Spaine, of France, and of England, &c. Recorded in Latine by Emanuel van Meteran in the 15. booke of his history of the low Countreys. (search)
foure of the clocke at afternoone before the residue of the English Fleet could overtake him. At the same time Hugo de Moncada governour of the foure Galliasses, made humble sute unto the Duke of Medina that he might be licenced to encounter the Admirall of England: which libertie the duke thought not good to permit unto him, because hee was loth to exceed the limites of his commision and charge. Upon Tuesday which was the three and twentie of July, the navie being come over against Portland , the wind began to turne Northerly, insomuch that the Spaniards had a fortunate and fit gale to invade the English. But the Englishmen having lesser and nimbler Ships, recovered againe the vantage of the winde from the Spaniards, whereat the Spaniards seemed to bee more incensed to fight then before. But when the English Fleete had continually and without intermission from morning to night, beaten and battered them with all their shot both great and small: the Spaniardes uniting themselves
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A report of the trueth of the fight about the Isles of Acores, the last of August 1591. betwixt the Revenge. one of her Majesties shippes, and an Armada of the king of Spaine; Penned by the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight. (search)
30. of her Majesties owne ships of war, and a few of our owne Marchants, by the wise, valiant, and advantagious conduct of the L. Charles Howard high Admirall of England, beaten and shuffled together; even from the Lizard in Cornwall first to Portland , where they shamefully left Don Pedro de Valdes, with his mighty ship; from Portland to Cales , where they lost Hugo de Moncado, with the Gallias of which he was Captaine, and from Cales , driven with squibs from their anchors, were chased outPortland to Cales , where they lost Hugo de Moncado, with the Gallias of which he was Captaine, and from Cales , driven with squibs from their anchors, were chased out of the sight of England, round about Scotland and Ireland . Were for the sympathie of their barbarous religion, hoping to finde succour and assistance, a great part of them were crusht against the rocks, and those other that landed, being very many in number, were notwithstanding broken, slaine, and taken, and so sent from village to village coupled in halters, to be shipped into England. Where her Majestie of her Princely and invincible disposition, disdaining to put them to death, and scorn
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Relation of the second Voyage to Guiana , performed and written in the yeere 1596. by Laurence Keymis Gent. (search)
ercy deliver us, and give us an understanding heart, in time to see, and to seeke that, which belongeth unto our peace. The second voyage to Guiana . SUNDAY the 26. of January, in the yeere of our Lord 1596. we departed from Portland road, in the Darling of London, having in company the Discoverer, a small pinnesse, whom we lost at sea, in foule weather, the Thursday next following. Friday, the 13. of February, wee fell with the Canarie Islands, where we expected our pinnesbes good against poyson. Turara. Wapo. Cutarapama. Macatto. 49 Waini . g. Charibes. Tocoopoima. g. Parana .   50 Barima. g.Caitooma.Arooca. Charibes.Arwaccas. Pekwa. g.Arwakima. Anawra.Aparwa.Arracurri. The 29. day of June we arrived in Portland roade, having spent five moneths in going, staying, and returning. 51 Amacur. g.         52 Aratoori. g.Cawrooma. g.Raleana, orOrenoque.MaiparIta caponeaOwarecapater.Warucanasso. Ilands in the mouth of Raleana.       In one w
The second voyage to Guiana . SUNDAY the 26. of January, in the yeere of our Lord 1596. we departed from Portland road, in the Darling of London, having in company the Discoverer, a small pinnesse, whom we lost at sea, in foule weather, the Thursday next following. Friday, the 13. of February, wee fell with the Canarie Islands, where we expected our pinnesse, according to our appoyntment, seven or eight dayes. Here we tooke two boats, the one a passenger, we bulged, the othebes good against poyson. Turara. Wapo. Cutarapama. Macatto. 49 Waini . g. Charibes. Tocoopoima. g. Parana .   50 Barima. g.Caitooma.Arooca. Charibes.Arwaccas. Pekwa. g.Arwakima. Anawra.Aparwa.Arracurri. The 29. day of June we arrived in Portland roade, having spent five moneths in going, staying, and returning. 51 Amacur. g.         52 Aratoori. g.Cawrooma. g.Raleana, orOrenoque.MaiparIta caponeaOwarecapater.Warucanasso. Ilands in the mouth of Raleana.       In one w
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Biographical note. (search)
In 1883, he resigned the presidency of Bowdoin College, but continued for two years longer his lectures on public law. During this time, he put to one side urgent invitations to the presidency of three other colleges of high standing. In 1885, finding that the long strain of work and wounds demanded a change of occupation, he went to Florida as president of a railroad construction company. In 1900, General Chamberlain was appointed by President McKinley Surveyor of Customs at the port of Portland, and through the courtesy of the Government he was enabled to make visits to Italy and to Egypt. The General was in great request as a speaker, and on various occasions his utterances showed a power that was thrilling. Among the more noteworthy of these addresses may be mentioned the following: Loyalty, before the Loyal Legion in Philadelphia. The sentiment and sovereignty of the country, at the Meade Memorial Service in Philadelphia. The State, the nation, and the people,
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Military order of the Loyal Legion of the United States: headquarters Commandery of the State of Maine. (search)
the United States: headquarters Commandery of the State of Maine. Portland, May 6, 1914 The following Tribute to the memory of Companie Chamberlain, a charter Companion of this Commandery, died at Portland, Maine, Tuesday, February 24, 1914. He was born in Brewer, September and moon-light reflecting coves taking them up in succession from Portland to Eastport, and as the ocean's voice dies away, hear her vast wilppointed by President McKinley Surveyor of Customs for the port of Portland and retained that position by successive re-appointments during thby that committee to have immediate charge of the ceremonies. The Portland battalion of the National Guard performed escort duty. The casketl of the late Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain which is to be held at Portland, Me., to-morrow, and I sincerely trust that you will find it possiblarold Wyllys, a Companion of this Commandery, a lawyer residing in Portland. This Commandery tenders its profound sympathy to the daughter, s
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid. (search)
ssage by the place was one sharp, continuous skirmish, we prevented them from gaining a position that would have forced us into a decisive combat. On the night of the 18th, we encamped again on the banks of the Ohio, at the little village of Portland, not far from Buffington Island. This was the point where Morgan had planned to recross the river (when he first contemplated the raid), in the event he could not join General Lee in Pennsylvania; and here was the scene of the disaster which clting of the snow in the mountains, came, this year, not in June, but in July, so that the ford at Buffington, usually quite shallow and practicable in the latter month, was, in 1863, deep and difficult. We were unfortunate, also, in arriving at Portland after nightfall, and feared to attempt, in the solid gloom, and without guides, the passage of the stream. Men and horses were alike exhausted; a train of vehicles of every description, filled with wounded men, and the artillery, had to be cros
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Morgan's Indiana and Ohio Railroad. (search)
s they will hardly believe in greater cowardice than that displayed by the noble corps of patriots referred to. We struck out over the knobs that night, in a northeasterly direction, in order to reach the old Pomeroy stage road in the morning at Portland, on the Sciota Valley Railroad, by the time Morgan should cross the road at Jackson, a few miles further north. We reached Portland at sunrise. Smoke was rising over Jackson, and we were not long in ascertaining that it proceeded from the depoPortland at sunrise. Smoke was rising over Jackson, and we were not long in ascertaining that it proceeded from the depot, which some foolish vandals of Morgan's had fired, thus revealing his whereabouts to his pursuers more accurately than they could otherwise have ascertained it. And now began, on the morning of July 17th, the most exciting part of this exciting expedition. The rebels knew we were neck and neck with them. They knew Hobson was pursuing them in the rear with the eagerness of a bloodhound. They knew their only chance of escape lay in reaching the fords some time in advance of both pursuers.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, San Francisco-Early California experiences-life on the Pacific coast-promoted Captain-Flush times in California (search)
killed most of our crop. This saved digging it up, for everybody on the Pacific coast seemed to have come to the conclusion at the same time that agriculture would be profitable. In 1853 more than three-quarters of the potatoes raised were permitted to rot in the ground, or had to be thrown away. The only potatoes we sold were to our own mess. While I was stationed on the Pacific coast we were free from Indian wars. There were quite a number of remnants of tribes in the vicinity of Portland in Oregon, and of Fort Vancouver in Washington Territory. They had generally acquired some of the vices of civilization, but none of the virtues, except in individual cases. The Hudson's Bay Company had held the North-west with their trading posts for many years before the United States was represented on the Pacific coast. They still retained posts along the Columbia River and one at Fort Vancouver, when I was there. Their treatment of the Indians had brought out the better qualities
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 29 (search)
ning at nine o'clock, together with a large quantity of stores. The main body of Hooker's army has gone toward Leesburg, except the garrison of Alexandria and Washington, which has retreated within the fortifications. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. The Northern papers say that our cruiser Tacony, taken from them, has destroyed twenty-two of their vessels since the 12th inst.; but that our men burnt her at last. Her crew then entered Portland, Maine, and cut out the steam cutter Caleb Cushing, which they subsequently blew up, and then were themselves taken prisoner. The President has decided that the obstructions below the city shall not be opened for the steam iron-clad Richmond to go out, until another iron-clad be in readiness to accompany her. Capt. Maury, at Mobile, writes that the two iron-clads, Trent and Nashville, now ready for sea, might take New Orleans and keep it. The President directs the Secretary of War
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