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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 147 37 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 14 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 28 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 14 2 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 14 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House. You can also browse the collection for Portland (Maine, United States) or search for Portland (Maine, United States) in all documents.

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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxviii. (search)
ces of reelection. Commissioner Dole ventured to say as much upon the President's announcement to him of his contemplated purpose. It matters not what becomes of me, replied Mr. Lincoln; we must have the men! If I go down, I intend to go like the Cumberland, with my colors flying! Upon Mr. Lincoln's return to Washington, after the capture of Richmond, a member of the Cabinet asked him if it would be proper to permit Jacob Thompson to slip through Maine in disguise, and embark from Portland. The President, as usual, was disposed to be merciful, and to permit the arch-rebel to pass unmolested, but the Secretary urged that he should be arrested as a traitor. By permitting him to escape the penalties of treason, persistently remarked the Secretary, you sanction it. Well, replied Mr. Lincoln, let me tell you a story. There was an Irish soldier here last, summer, who wanted something to drink stronger than water, and stopped at a drug-shop, where he espied a soda-fountain. Mr.