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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 58 8 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 57 3 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 56 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 44 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 33 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 32 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) or search for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 3 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
tewart's, Cheatham's, and Stevenson's, near Fayetteville, in time to engage one of the enemy's columheadquarters, on the 4th, from Charlotte to Fayetteville, considering the latter as a better point tn the 4th. The instructions to turn toward Fayetteville, repeated, reached him there, and were immeeedsboroa — and was continuing the march to Fayetteville in its former order. General Kilpatrick's The important object of opening the road to Fayetteville, blocked by this camp, was gained by this ae 10th, just described; and on the 11th, at Fayetteville, when a large Federal squadron that dashed rdee was instructed to follow the road from Fayetteville to Raleigh, which for thirty miles is also 1th he halted on that road, five miles from Fayetteville. The South Carolina State troops, eleven hressed on the 13th, eight or ten miles from Fayetteville, but held its ground; and on the 14th, at Shat that wing, which had been following the Fayetteville road to Goldsboroa, had crossed to that fro[3 more...]
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memorandum for Major-General S. D. Lee. (search)
s important to move as soon as possible-and by the route least likely to meet the enemy — to the points on the railroad where most injury can be done with the least exposure of our troops. The bridges over the branches of Duck River and of the Elk are suggested. As the fords of the Tennessee are in and above the Muscle Shoals, it would be well to move toward Tuscumbia first, and, in crossing the river and moving forward, to ascertain as many routes as possible by which to return. Fayetteville would be a point in the route to the part of the railroad between Elk and Duck Rivers. General Bragg is informed of your intended movement, and has been requested to put Brigadier-General Roddy under your command. Should circumstances now unforeseen make the enterprise too hazardous, abandon it. Your own judgment must decide if risks do or do not counterbalance the important results to be hoped for from success. Brigadier-General Chalmers's move to Memphis and Charleston Railr
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memoranda of the operations of my corps, while under the command of General J. E. Johnston, in the Dalton and Atlanta, and North Carolina campaigns. (search)
prevented by the First Georgia regulars, under Colonel Wayne, from the opposite bank of the river. Left Cheraw March 3d, and subsequently received orders from General Johnston to move to Smithfield, North Carolina, by way of Rockingham and Fayetteville. March 10th. Hampton and Wheeler, who had been hanging on the left flank of the enemy, gained a success over Kilpatrick's cavalry only less complete from encountering two brigades of infantry assigned to protect Kilpatrick from the rough usage he had been receiving from the hands of Wheeler. A handsome little affair occurred at Fayetteville next morning. Infantry had crossed Cape Fear, and cavalry had not come in, when one hundred and fifty of the enemy's cavalry charged into the town, which was full of trains and led horses, but without troops. General Hampton, at the head of a dozen men-staff-officers and couriers-charged the body, killing two with his own hand, capturing some, and driving the remainder out of town.