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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 58 8 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 57 3 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 56 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 44 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 33 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 32 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) or search for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
rsville and Elk River. This was found impassable. To ferry would have consumed too much time, and to build a bridge still more; so there was no alternative but to turn up Elk River by way of Gilbertsboro, Elkton, etc., to the stone bridge at Fayetteville, where we crossed the Elk, and proceeded to Winchester and Deckerd. At Fayetteville I received orders from General Grant to come to Bridgeport with the Fifteenth Army Corps, and to leave General Dodge's command at Pulaski, and along the raiFayetteville I received orders from General Grant to come to Bridgeport with the Fifteenth Army Corps, and to leave General Dodge's command at Pulaski, and along the railroad from Columbia to Decatur. I instructed General Blair to follow with the Second and First Divisions by way of New Market, Larkinsville, and Bellefonte, while I conducted the other two divisions by way of Deckerd; the Fourth Division crossing the mountain to Stevenson, and the Third by University Place and Swedon's Cove. In person I proceeded by Swedon's Cove and Battle Creek, reaching Bridgeport on the night of November 13th. I immediately telegraphed to the commanding general my arriv
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
osion of one such shell would have demoralized a gang of negroes, and thus would have prevented even the attempt to clear the road. Meantime Schofield, with the Twenty-third Corps, presented a bold front toward East Point, daring and inviting the enemy to sally out to attack him in position. His first movement was on the 30th, to Mount Gilead Church, then to Morrow's Mills, facing Rough and Ready. Thomas was on his right, within easy support, moving by cross-roads from Red Oak to the Fayetteville road, extending from Couch's to Renfrew's; and Howard was aiming for Jonesboroa. I was with General Thomas that day, which was hot but otherwise very pleasant. We stopped for a short noon-rest near a little church (marked on our maps as Shoal-Creek Church), which stood back about a hundred yards from the road, in a grove of native oaks. The column had halted in the road, stacked their arms, and the men were scattered about — some lying in the shade of the trees, and others were bring
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
pronounce that impossible at this time. Therefore, I am moving (as hitherto designed) for the railroad west of Branchville, then will swing across to Orangeburg, which will interpose my army between Charleston and the interior. Contemporaneous with this, Foster will demonstrate up the Edisto, and afterward make a lodgment at Bull's Bay, and occupy the common road which leads from Mount Pleasant toward Georgetown. When I get to Columbia, I think I shall move straight for Goldsboroa, via Fayetteville. By this circuit I cut all roads, and devastate the land; and the forces along the coast, commanded by Foster, will follow my movement, taking any thing the enemy lets go, or so occupy his attention that he cannot detach all his forces against me. I feel sure of getting Wilmington, and may be Charleston, and being at Goldsboroa, with its railroads finished back to Morehead City and Wilmington, I can easily take Raleigh, when it seems that Lee must come out. If Schofield comes to Beaufort
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
d equipment, and took him as far as Fayetteville, North Carolina, whence he was sent to Washington aridge, diverged to the left, so as to enter Fayetteville next after the Fourteenth Corps, which was ton, North Carolina: We are marching for Fayetteville, will be there Saturday, Sunday, and Mondayour roads difficult, and may delay us about Fayetteville, in which case I would like to have some brsome little progress; on the 11th I reached Fayetteville, and found that General Hardee, followed byss to make junction with General Hardee, in Fayetteville, broke across this line, captured the houseof which he boasted much in passing through Fayetteville. It was also reported that, in the mornin of the Mississippi, in the field, Fayetteville, North Carolina, March 12, 1865. Lieutenant-Generalo officers and fifty men, who reached us at Fayetteville; so that, by March 12th, I was in full commtain Young, United States Navy, who reached Fayetteville after I had left, and undertook to patrol t[19 more...]