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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 58 8 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 57 3 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 56 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 44 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 33 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 32 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 32 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 28 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 26 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) or search for Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 17 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Averasboro, battle of. (search)
Averasboro, battle of. On his march from Fayetteville to Goldsboro, Sherman's forces were menaced by the Confederates, and Kilpatrick had several skirmishes with Wheeler and Hampton. He had struck the rear of Hardee's column (March 8, 1865) in its retreat towards Fayetteville. He had fought Hampton, and was defeated, losingFayetteville. He had fought Hampton, and was defeated, losing many men (who were made prisoners) and guns. Kilpatrick barely escaped on foot in a swamp. where he rallied his men. They fell upon Hampton, who was plundering their camp, routed him, and retook the guns. Hampton had captured 103 Nationals and killed or wounded eighty. At Fayetteville, Sherman utterly destroyed the arsenal, wiFayetteville, Sherman utterly destroyed the arsenal, with all the valuable public property of the Confederates there. Moving on, Sherman in accordance with his usual plan, made movements to distract his adversary. He sent Slocum with four divisions of the left wing, preceded by cavalry, towards Averasboro and the main road to Raleigh; while two divisions of that wing, with the train
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Callis, John B. 1828-1898 (search)
Callis, John B. 1828-1898 Military officer; born in Fayetteville, N. C., Jan. 3, 1828; went to Wisconsin in 1840; entered the army as captain in the 7th Wisconsin Volunteers when the Civil War broke out; brevetted brigadier-general in March, 1864; sent to Huntsville, Ala., as assistant commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau; resigned and elected to Congress in 1868. During his term of office he presented the resolution on which the Ku Klux Klan (q. v.) bill was passed. He died in Lancaster, Wis., Sept. 23, 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Caswell, Richard 1729-1789 (search)
29: went to North Carolina in 1746, and practised law there, serving in the Assembly from 1754 to 1771, and being speaker in 1770. In the battle of the Allamance he commanded Tryon's right wing, but soon afterwards identified himself with the cause of the patriots, and was a member of the Continental Congress (1774-75). For three years he was president of the Provincial Congress of North Carolina, and was governor of the State from 1777 to 1779. In February, 1776, he was in command of the patriot troops in the battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, and received the thanks of Congress and the commission of majorgeneral for the victory there achieved. He led the State troops in the battle near Camden (August, 1780); and was controller-general in 1782. He was again governor in 1784-86; and a member of the convention that framed the national Constitution. While presiding as speaker in the North Carolina Assembly he was stricken with paralysis, and died in Fayetteville, N. C., Nov. 20, 1789.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dobbin, James Cochrane, 1814-1857 (search)
Dobbin, James Cochrane, 1814-1857 Statesman; born in Fayetteville, N. C., in 1814; graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1832; elected to Congress in 1845; and in 1848 to the State legislature, of which he became speaker in 1850. In 1853 President Pierce appointed him Secretary of the Navy. He died in Fayetteville, Aug. 4, 1857. Dobbin, James Cochrane, 1814-1857 Statesman; born in Fayetteville, N. C., in 1814; graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1832; elected to Congress in 1845; and in 1848 to the State legislature, of which he became speaker in 1850. In 1853 President Pierce appointed him Secretary of the Navy. He died in Fayetteville, Aug. 4, 1857.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ellis, John Willis, 1820-1861 (search)
Ellis, John Willis, 1820-1861 Governor; born in Rowan county, N. C., Nov. 25, 1820; graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1841, and admitted to the bar in 1842. He was governor of North Carolina in 1858-61. In the name of his State he occupied Fort Macon, the works at Wilmington, and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville, Jan. 2, 1861. In April of the same year he ordered the seizure of the United States mint at Charlotte. He died in Raleigh, N. C., in 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 (search)
28th, General Meade directed his left wing, under Reynolds, upon Emmettsburg, and his right upon New Windsor, leaving General French, with 11,000 men, to protect the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and convoy the public property from Harper's Ferry to Washington. Buford's cavalry was then at this place, and Kilpatrick's at Hanover, where he encountered and defeated the rear of Stuart's cavalry, who was roving the country in search of the main army of Lee. On the rebel side, Hill had reached Fayetteville, on the Cashtown road, on the 28th, and was followed on the same road by Longstreet, on the 29th. The eastern side of the mountain, as seen from Gettysburg, was lighted up at night by the camp-fires of the enemy's advance, and the country swamped with his foraging parties. It was now too evident to be questioned that the thunder-cloud, so long gathering in blackness, would soon burst on some part of the devoted vicinity of Gettysburg. June 30 was a day of important preparations. At
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Floyd, John Buchanan 1807- (search)
of the House of Representatives, in the act of stripping the Northern arsenals of arms and ammunition and filling those of the South with those munitions of war. As early as Dec. 29, 1859, a year before, according to the report of the committee, he had ordered the transfer of 65,000 percussion muskets, 40,000 muskets altered to percussion, and 10,000 percussion rifles from the armory at Springfield, Mass., and the arsenals at Watervliet, N. Y., and Watertown, Mass., to the arsenals at Fayetteville, N. C., Charleston, S. C., Augusta, Ga., Mount Vernon, Ala., and Baton Rouge, La.; and these were distributed in the spring of 1860, before the meeting of the Democratic Convention at Charleston. Eleven days after the issuing of the above order by Floyd, Jefferson Davis introduced, Jan. 9, 1860, into the national Senate a bill to authorize the sale of public arms to the several States and Territories, and to regulate the appointment of superintendents of the national armories. Davis repo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forrest, Nathan Bedford 1821-1877 (search)
orcements arrived to hold it. These, with the garrison, after a sharp conflict, became prisoners. Forrest then pushed on northward to Pulaski, in Tennessee, destroying the railway; but General Rousseau, at Pulaski, repulsed Forrest after brisk skirmishing several hours, when the raider made eastward, and struck the railway between Tullahoma and Decherd. He was confronted and menaced by National forces under Rousseau, Steedman, and Morgan, and withdrew before he had done much damage. At Fayetteville he divided his forces, giving 4,000 to Buford, his second in command. Buford attacked Athens (Oct. 2-3), which General Granger had regarrisoned with the 73d Indiana Regiment, and was repulsed. Forrest had pushed on to Columbia, on the Duck River, with 3,000 men, but did not attack, for he met Rousseau, with 4,000 men, coming down from Nashville. At the same time, Gen. C. C. Washburne was moving up the Tennessee on steamers, with 4,000 troops, 3,000 of them cavalry, to assist in capturi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Graham, Joseph 1759-1836 (search)
Graham, Joseph 1759-1836 Military officer; born in Chester county, Pa., Oct. 13, 1759; removed to North Carolina at an early age. In 1778 he joined the Continental army and served through the remainder of the war with gallantry; in 1780 received three bullet wounds and six sabre-thrusts while guarding the retreat of Maj. W. R. Davie, near Charlotte; later, after his recovery, he defeated 600 Tories near Fayetteville with a force of 136 men.. In 1814 he was commissioned major-general, when he led 1,000 men from North Carolina against the Creek Indians. He died in Lincoln county, N. C., Nov. 12, 1836.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886 (search)
lroad. We must drive him from Manassas, and clear the country between that place and Gainesville, where McDowell is. If Morell has not joined you, send word to him to push forward immediately; also send word to Banks to hurry forward with all speed to take your place at Warrenton Junction. It is necessary, on all accounts, that you should be here by daylight. I send an officer with this despatch who will conduct you to this place. Be sure to send word to Banks, who is on the road from Fayetteville, probably in the direction of Bealeton. Say to Banks, also, that he had best run back the railroad trains to this side of Cedar Run. If he is not with you, write him to that effect. By command of Major-General Pope. George D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Maj.-Gen. F.-J. Porter, Warrenton Junction. P. S.—If Banks is not at Warrenton Junction, leave a regiment of infantry and two pieces of artillery as a guard till he comes up, with instructions to follow you immediatel
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