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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Big Lick (Virginia, United States) or search for Big Lick (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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captured, including the splendid State flag of North Carolina, worked by the ladies of that State; also quaint and antiquated arms, old swords and sabres, and flintlock muskets, shotguns and pistols, rusty with age. Fortress Monroe, Feb. 19.--Three thousand five hundred stand of arms were captured at Roanoke Island by Gen. Burnside, and seventy-five tons of ammunition. The steamer Alice Price arrived at Hatteras in good condition, and, with the steamer Louisiana, had gone to Roanoke. Gen. Burnside's troops have nearly all been re-embarked. The revised list of killed and wounded at Roanoke Island and at Elizabeth stands as follows: --Killed, 50; wounded, 222. This includes the losses in both army and navy. The wounded are doing very well. The rebel prisoners are awaiting arrangements for being paroled. Their officers had been sent on board the Spalding. The prisoners number two thousand five hundred and twenty-seven. The French Admiral and his staff
[for the Richmond Dispatch.] Messrs. Editors: A communication in this morning's Dispatch, over the signature of "Justice," in defence of the Secretary of War, contains the following language in relation to Col. Henningsen: "Here comes in a fact of great significance. This report says that 'the forces under Col. Henningson, with fifteen pieces of artillery, were ordered to Roanoke, but that he unfortunately misunderstood his orders and stopped at Elizabeth City.'--There can be no reasonable doubt that his force and his fifteen pieces of artillery were to defend this identical causeway.--There can be no doubt that if those fifteen pieces of cannon had been placed so as to command this cause way that it would have swept away any enemy that dared venture upon it, and thus changed what became a sad disaster into a glorious victory. Thus we see that the Secretary had provided the means, but that the plans were frustrated by the mistake of a subordinate. Is he, then, to be hel
The wounded at Roanoke. It is reported that the sick and wounded at the battle of Roanoke were well cared for by the Federal officers, and that they received every attention possible to give them under the circumstances. They were placed on the steamer "Geo. Peabody," and with the surgeons taken to Elizabeth City, where a temporary hospital has been established. The following is a list of the surgeons in charge; Surgeons, Henry P. Ritter, Frank Patterson, Wm. Shepardson. Assistant Roanoke were well cared for by the Federal officers, and that they received every attention possible to give them under the circumstances. They were placed on the steamer "Geo. Peabody," and with the surgeons taken to Elizabeth City, where a temporary hospital has been established. The following is a list of the surgeons in charge; Surgeons, Henry P. Ritter, Frank Patterson, Wm. Shepardson. Assistant Surgeons, L. K. Saunders, Samuel D. Young, S. M. McPherson, J. J. Baxter, Drs. Gordon and Temple. Hospital Steward, Theodore Pool. The wounded men are all doing well, and will be immediately removed to Norfolk, Medical supplies and stores have been sent down to them, and it is certain none will suffer for want of proper attention and treatment.