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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 2 0 Browse Search
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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Preface. (search)
reached the full measure of his greatness. Man may not read the future: but it is my firm conviction, that, had he lived through his second term, he would have continued to grow, as he had grown, in the estimation and confidence of his countrymen; rising to a grander moral height with every emergency, careful always to weigh every argument opposed to his convictions, but, once mounted upon those convictions, grounded in righteousness, as immovable as one of the giant ranges of our own Rocky Mountains! Aspiring in no sense to the dignity of a biography, this volume will fulfil its object if it helps to any better knowledge of one, who, apart from the reverence with which he ever will be regarded for his connection with the cause of human Freedom, was the best product and exemplar which the world has yet seen of American soil and institutions; the study of whose character, illustrating as it did the highest form of statesmanship, founded upon truth, justice, and solid integrity,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hart, Albert Bushnell 1854- (search)
there a better watered land; little streams everywhere abound and there is a copious rainfall up to the foot-hills of the Rockies. In all the region crinkled by the North American ice-sheets, lovely lakes abound. As the Kentuckian poor white reveid of his own neighborhood: Nature has made ponds up on the mounting. Even on the long and desolate eastern slopes of the Rockies some few places are made to blossom by irrigating canals. Pioneers farming. Next in value comes the timber. Bies the universal steel tree, yielding branches in every shape and for every purpose. Far to the west, in the heart of the Rockies, the mountains cover gold, silver, and the copper slave of the electric lamp. The wealth that comes from above the Almost every branch of human learning is now taught thoroughly and practically somewhere between the Appalachians and the Rockies. Two important tests of intellectuality, though not the only ones, are art and literature. The Rookwood pottery is
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ingersoll, Ernest 1852- (search)
Ingersoll, Ernest 1852- Naturalist; born in Monroe, Mich., March 13, 1852; was educated at Oberlin College and the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology. He became connected with the Hayden Survey in 1873, and later was made a member of the United States Fish Commission. In 1880 he was a special agent of the census to report on the oyster industry. He went to California in 1883 to write special articles for Harper's magazine. Later he was editor of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company's publications in Montreal. He is author of Nests and eggs of American birds; The Oyster industries of the United States; Friends worth knowing; Knocking round the Rockies; The crest of the continent; Western Canada; The book of the Ocean, etc. He is also editor and part author of a series of guide-books to the Eastern States and cities.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Irrigation, (search)
the 100th meridian west to the Rocky Mountains, a distance of 250 miles, and having an extent of about 700 miles from Manitoba on the north to Texas on the south. 2. A region beginning at the eastern foothills of the Rocky Mountains and extending westward to the foot of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the Cascade Mountains in Oregon and Washington. It comprises an immense territory, Irrigation by pipe system. Irrigation by artesian-well system. which includes the park system of the Rockies, culminating in Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, and northeast Arizona. The section contains many mountain systems, the Great Basin of Salt Lake, the great cañon system and plateau of the Colorado, the meadow-lands of Nevada, the northwest Columbia Basin, and the National Park. 3. A region including about onefourth of the territory of California, and divided into two parts —the foothills of the Sierras and the broad, level valley lying between the Sierras and the Coast Range. In 1900
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
h so vast and mysterious a hinterland free to any one who might come to take it, novelists, like farmers, were less prompt in America than in Europe to settle down to cultivate intensively known fields. There is a closer analogy, indeed, between the geographic and the imaginative frontier of the United States than has been pointed out. As the first advanced, thin, straggling, back from the Atlantic, over the Alleghanies, down the Ohio, beyond the Mississippi, across the Great Plains and the Rockies to the Pacific, the other followed, also thin and straggling but with an incessant purpose to find out new territories over which the imagination could play and to claim them for its own. Until now, wrote Cooper in 1828, the Americans have been tracing the outline of their great national picture. The work of filling up has just seriously commenced. He had in mind only the physical process, but his image applies as well to that other process in which he was the most effective pioneer. T
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
he minor or Sunday-school vices, fortified by certain tolerant democratic standards of his own, well acquainted with the great American cities, equipped with ideas of natural beauty and sublimity acquired on the Mississippi; the Great Plains, the Rockies, the Pacific, the Sandwich Islands, setting out to see with his own unawed eyes how much truth there is in the reported wonders of the little old world. Mark Twain describes Europe and the East for men, roughly speaking, like himself. He doeifficult to classify in one group. His A cross Russia from the Baltic to the Danube (189) takes us into rather out-of-the-way paths, and then he strikes for Spanish cities with glimpses of Gibraltar and Tangier (1892), only to jump to Beyond the Rockies (1894), with A spring journey in California (1895) and some Cruising in the Caribbees the same year. Albert Payson Terhune shows us Syria from the saddle (1896) with his customary virility; John Bell Bouton takes us Roundabout to Moscow (18
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Beranger, 595, 596 Berenson, Bernard, 490 Bergson, 244, 251, 253, 257 Berichte üiber eine Reise nach den Westlichen Staaten Nordamerikas, 578 Berkeley, Sir, William, 385 Berlin, Irving, 289 Berlin (University), 462, 465, 467, 484 Bernard of Clairvaux, 500 Bernhardt, Sarah, 280 Bernstein, Henri, 282 Berrien, 337 Bertha, the sewing machine girl, 287 Bertsch, H., 582 Betsy Brown, 510 Betsy from Pike, 515 Between the dark and the daylight, 84 Beyond the Rockies, 165 Bible, the, 6, 202, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 215, 217, 219, 222, 230, 370, 473, 518, 525, 530, 536, 556, 575, 595 Bible argument against slavery in the light of divine revelation, the, 340 Bible, Church and Reason, The, 205 n. Biblical scholarship and inspiration, 205 n. Bibliotheca Americana Vetustissima, 184 Bidwell, John, 150 Bienenstock, Melliotrophium, 573 Bierce, Ambrose, 92 Bigelow, E. B., 438 Bigelow, John, 141, 152 Bigelow, Poultney, 164 Biggers, Earl,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
hree he went West, and was employed as a clerk with a large drygoods house in the State of Kansas. At that time bloody riots were the order of the day, and when Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston of the United States army was sent to Kansas to quell the disturbances, Captain Blassingame joined his forces, and for his bravery was promoted to the rank of colonel. He was held in highest esteem by all as a man, soldier and officer, and after the riots were over he moved farther west and settled in the Rockies. Little of his frontier life is known, but it was an eventful one, full of interesting incidents. When South Carolina seceded in 1860, he had been living in the west four years, but on receiving the news he left his pursuits in the Rocky mountains and returned to his native State to defend her rights. He rode all the way on horseback from Pike's Peak, a distance of 2,000 miles, and upon his arrival enlisted in Company K, Spartan rifles, of the Fifth South Carolina volunteers. He first
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Development of the free soil idea in the United States. (search)
ty was ratified by both governments in July, 1821, and that sovereignty was formally transferred to the United States. The north boundary line of Florida followed the St. Mary's river from its mouth to its source, thence west to the Chattahoochee, thence along that stream to the 31st parallel, thence west to the Mississippi river, including the present State of Florida, parts of Alabama and Mississippi, and some parts of the present Louisiana. It also included all that territory west of the Rockies and north of the 42d parallel to the British possessions, and from the Rocky mountains to the Pacific, including Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and part of Wyoming, thereby extinguishing the Spanish claims to this vast area. Florida proper was acquired with the institution of slavery existing, and was not subject to the restriction of the Missouri compromise, as claimed by one school of politicians and subject to the restriction as claimed by the other. Slavery was neither prohibited nor sa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The South's Museum. (search)
ng serene in her dignity with the halo of her glorious history around her, she commanded peace. The only reply vouchsafed was the calling out of 75,000 troops and the tramp of hostile footsteps on her sacred soil. Like the flash from Heaven her sword leaped from its scabbard, and her war cry, Sic semper tyrannis, echoed round the world, and her sons circled the earth with the blaze of their enthusiasm as they marched to the call of the old mother. Student from Gottingen, trapper from the Rockies, soldier and sailor, army and navy, men and women, staked life and fortune to stand by the mother of us all. And Virginians stood in line to guard their homes from invasion, her altars from desecration, her institutions from destruction. She resisted invasion. It cannot be too often repeated or too plainly stated. Only resisted invasion. Virginia never seceded from the Union. She resisted invasion of rights, as her free ancestors for 800 years had done with arms and force. Bef
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