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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 16 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 7 3 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 30, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Dalton-Atlanta operations. (search)
trike but two and a half per cent. of men exposed to their muskets and cannon, in seven lines at least, in two hours and a half. The writer has seen American soldiers, not inured to war, win a field with a loss ten times greater proportionally. Page 70: The Confederates are accused of burning their pontoon bridges after crossing the Chattahoochee. They did not commit that folly. On the 17th, it was reported that the Federal army was on the southeast bank of the Chattahoochee, from Roswell to Powers' ferry. That night General Hood was placed in command of the Southern army by telegraph. On the 18th, at his urgent request, Johnston forced the troops on the. high ground, overlooking the valley of Peachtree creek from the south, to meet the advance of the Federal forces reported that morning by General Wheeler. General Sherman's returns, on pages 24 and 136, shows ninety-eight thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven men present for duty May 1st; one hundred and twelve thou
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
on high and commanding ground with good roads leading to the east. At the same time General Garrard moved rapidly on Roswell, and destroyed the factories which had supplied the rebel armies with cloth for years. Over one of these, the woolen faour own citizens to fabricate cloth for hostile uses. General Garrard was then ordered to secure the shallow ford at Roswell and hold it until he could be relieved by infantry, and as I contemplated transferring the Army of the Tennessee from the extreme right to the left, I ordered General Thomas to send a division of his infantry that was nearest up to Roswell to hold the ford until General McPherson could send up a corps from the neighborhood of Nickajack. General Newton's division wass already across at the mouth of Soap Creek, and to march by Cross Keys; and General McPherson to direct his course from Roswell straight against the Augusta road at some point east of Decatur near Stone Mountain. General Garrard's cavalry acted wit
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
s almost impossible. Having decided to pass the river by our left, strong demonstrations were made upon our right to confirm the enemy in the impression that the movement was to be made in that direction, and that we would attempt to cross the river at some point below the mouth of Nickajack Creek. The points selected for the crossing were at Roswell Factory and Phillips' (Isham's) Ferry, and the Army of the Tennessee, which had been demonstrating upon our right, was suddenly thrown to Roswell, where it crossed the Chattahoochee upon a trestle bridge, built by the pioneers of the Sixteenth Army Corps out of the materials at hand. No opposition was made by the enemy. The Army of the Ohio, which had been on the left, now become the center, made a rapid movement across the river at Phillips' Ferry, surprising a small force of the enemy stationed there, and capturing one piece of artillery. While the force which actually effected the crossing was engaged in constructing some light
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
Tunnel Hill at daylight on the 7th in three columns-Palmer's corps on the direct road from Ringgold, Howard's via Lee's house, and Hooker's via Nickajack Gap and Trickum. The enemy made some show of resistance in Palmer's front, but evacuated Tunnel Hill on the appearance of Howard's column on his flank, and fled toward Buzzard RPalmer's command was then moved forward and took position on Howard's right along the ridge, and both corps remained there for the night. Hooker's column reached Trickum Post-Office about 4 p. m. and camped for the night, picketing strongly the roads leading from Buzzard Roost and Dalton, as well as the approaches from the directhdrawn to a, position in the valley out of reach of the enemy's guns; Kilpatrick's communicated with General McPherson's command at Villanow, and then returned to Trickum. Brig. Gen. Ed. McCook was ordered to concentrate his cavalry division and take post on the left of General Schofield until General Stoneman's cavalry could arri
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
oved forward and formed on the left of General Stanley, who had advanced his skirmish and main lines, took some of the enemy's rifle-pits and captured prisoners. The enemy retired this night. July 5, marched, following General Wood, who had a skirmish with the enemy's cavalry near Pace's Ferry, driving them over it. Encamped near Vining's Station, in reserve. July 6, remained in camp. July 7, moved camp, our left resting on Rottenwood Creek. July 8, remained in camp. July 9, marched to Roswell to support Garrard's cavalry and occupy any ground they had gained after crossing the river. Crossed the river about dusk at Shallow Ford and relieved the cavalry, who recrossed to the north side, except their picket in front. July 10, adjusted our lines and made a t~te-de-pont. General Dodge, with two divisions of the Sixteenth Corps, arrived to-day and relieved our front line. July 11, recrossed the river and went into camp on hills near Shallow Ford. July 12, moved back to our old c
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 39 (search)
he officers and men present for duty. Here fell Colonel Miller, mortally wounded, a brave and patriotic young officer of rare ability. The command of the regiment now devolved upon Captain McNeal. For a short time, commencing a few days previous to this, I make my report from data in possession of the adjutant, being myself absent sick. On the 2d day of July, the enemy having left our front, the regiment marched through Marietta, Ga., toward the Chattahoochee River, crossed the river at Roswell on the 9th, and with the rest of the brigade fortified a position on the left bank of the stream. Several unimportant changes were made, when on the 18th of July the regiment marched with the army toward Atlanta, Ga. Was in battle on the left bank of Peach Tree Creek July 20. Our loss was very light and that of the enemy very severe. The regiment remained in camp near Atlanta until August 1, when with the rest of the brigade moved to the extreme left of the army near the Augusta railroad
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
in the advance. At 3 p. m. halted and camped at Vining's Station. Remained at this place until July 7. At 8 a. m. moved two miles to left and camped near Rottenwood Creek. Remained at this place until July 9. Marched at 6.30 a. m., reaching Roswell at 4 p. m. Crossed the Chattahoochee River at a ford at 7 p. m., the men wading. Moved up to top of bluff one mile from the river and lay for the night. July 10, built a line of works. July 11, recrossed the river at noon, and camped at RosweRoswell. July 12, moved back to camp of 8th instant. July 13, marched at 9 a. m., crossing river at Pace's Ferry at 10 a. m. Went into bivouac 3 p. m., and built a line of works two miles above ferry. July 14, in compliance with orders, regiment reported to Captain Bridges, chief of ordnance Fourth Corps, for fatigue duty, by whose direction the regiment was employed during the day in building a road from Pace's Ferry up the bluff, as well as a bridge across the river. Bivouacked by the river to-
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 43 (search)
from Calhoun, Ga., to Pleasant Hill; engaged at Pleasant Hill from 4 p. m. to 6 p. m. May 25, took position at New Hope Church, on left of Twentieth Army Corps; engaged constantly in skirmishing for eleven days. June 6 and 7, covered removal of hospital, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps. 18th, supported skirmish line at Mud Creek. 19th, skirmished on Noonday Creek, in front of Kenesaw Mountain, taking 12 prisoners. 27th, formed part of column of attack on enemy's works. July 9, marched to Roswell and forded Chattahoochee River. 11th, recrossed river and returned to Rottenwood Creek. 13th, crossed river at Powers' Ferry. 20th, skirmished with the enemy, driving him and capturing three lines of skirmish pits, gained position; was attacked by enemy in afternoon, and repulsed him. July 22, moved to position in front of Atlanta and built works. August 1, moved to left of line, relieving Twenty-third Army Corps. 25th, marched to west of Atlantic and Western Railroad. 30th, skirmished wit
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
ke our old position we had left in the morning. The order was carried out in good order. We were kept in reserve until the 30th of June, when the regiment took position on the left of the front line, where we remained until July 2, 8 p. m., when we moved to the left. Marched again on the 3d of July. Passed Marietta. Remained all the day on the 4th of July in camp in line of battle. Moved on the 5th. Encamped near the Chattahoochee River. Changed camps on the 7th of July. Marched to Roswell July 9. Crossed the Chattahoochee River the same night. Recrossed the river on the 12th. Arrived in camp again on the 13th of July. Crossed the river again on the 14th. Stayed in camp until July the 18th. Resumed our march again.. Camped that night near Buck Head. Left camp in the evening of the 19th; crossed Peach Tree Creek and went in position. On the 20th of July, in the morning, changed our position. My regiment was posted in the center of the second line. About 3 p. m. I was
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
tlanta. We followed to Vining's Station, near the Chattahoochee River, where we remained until the 9th instant. On the morning of July 9 the division marched to Roswell to take advantage of a lodgment that had been effected by our cavalry on the south side of the Chattahoochee River. The day was excessively warm, and the march very tedious, many of the men falling out of the ranks from sheer exhaustion. About 5 p. m. the brigade was massed about one-half mile northwest of Roswell, where the men prepared supper, and about dark resumed the line of march through the town, and to the river, which was crossed after dark by fording, and we immediately proceedrecrossed the river on a bridge temporarily constructed by the Sixteenth Army Corps near the ruins of the one burned by the enemy, and encamped for the night near Roswell. On the morning of the 12th resumed the march and returned to our old camp near Vining's Station. On the 13th of the month again crossed the Chattahoochee River
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