Your search returned 97 results in 49 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 6: first campaign in the Valley. (search)
y brow began to congeal with stony rigor, the calm blue eye to kindle with that blaze, steady at once and intense, before which every other eye quailed; and his penalties were so prompt and inexorable, that no one desired to adventure another act of disobedience. His force was ultimately increased by the accession of volunteers from Virginia, and of a few Southern troops, to forty-five hundred men. Ammunition was forwarded to him, additional cannon of heavy calibre were procured, and the Pendleton battery, from his own village, afterwards famous on many a hard-fought field, was added to his command. Several questions of peculiar delicacy were to be handled by him. One was the control of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. From the western boundary of Maryland to the Ohio river, this great thoroughfare passed through the territory of Virginia by two branches. It had opened up to the inhabitants valuable access to the eastern cities, which many of them prized more than liberties, o
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 7: Manassas. (search)
hile the remainder came to the ground designed for them, these two pieces held the enemy in check by their accurate fire. The opposing batteries were then upon the hill beyond the valley in front, which was also swarming with heavy masses of Federal infantry. Jackson recalled Imboden's battery, which had entered the action with General Bee's command, and gallantly maintained a perilous position until all its supports were routed. He brought up the other two guns of Stanard, and also the Pendleton battery, so that twelve pieces, which a little after were increased to seventeen, were placed in line under his command behind the crest of the eminence. Behind this formidable array he placed the 4th and 27th Regiments, commanded respectively by Colonel Preston and Lieut.-Colonel Echols, lying upon their breasts to avoid the storm of cannon-shot. On the right of the batteries, he posted Harper's 5th Virginia, and on the left the 2d Regiment commanded by Colonel Allen, and the 33d led b
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 8: winter campaign in the Valley. 1861-62. (search)
e military power of the United States under the management of General McClellan, might occupy all our forces elsewhere. His representations were so far successful, that about the middle of November, his old Brigade was sent to him, with the Pendleton battery, now under the command of Captain McLaughlin. Early in December, Colonel William B. Taliaferro's brigade from the army of the Northwest, consisting of the 1st Georgia, 3d Arkansas, and 23d and 37th Virginia regiments, reached Winchesteson was now verified, and that force, to save its communications, was after a little compelled to retire to the Shenandoah mountain, only twenty-five miles from Staunton, thus surrendering to the inroads of the Federalists the three counties of Pendleton, Highland, and Bath. Winchester was again exposed to the advance of the enemy from four directions. The difficulties of General Jackson's position were, at the same time, aggravated by a diminution of his force. General Loring having been
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 11: McDowell. (search)
t, and recognized in this happy beginning the vigor and genius of the great commander. General Jackson immediately threw forward a few companies of cavalry under Captain Sheetz to harass the enemy's rear, and collected his infantry in the valley beyond McDowell to prepare for a close pursuit. The mountain passes by which General Banks might have communicated succors to Milroy were immediately obstructed, and an active officer was sent by a circuitous route to the northern parts of Pendleton county, below Franklin, to collect the partisan soldiers of the mountains in the enemy's rear. They were exhorted to fill the roads with felled timber, to tear down the walls which supported the turnpike along the precipitous cliffs, and to destroy the bridges, in order that the retreat of Milroy might be retarded, and the advance of Fremont to his aid checked, until his flying army was again beaten and dispersed. Saturday morning, the victors resumed their march, refreshed by a night of qui
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 49: close of the Valley campaign. (search)
commands. My army during the entire campaign had been self-sustaining so far as provisions and forage were concerned, and a considerable number of beef cattle had been sent to General Lee's army; and when the difficulties under which I labored are considered, I think I may confidently assert that I had done as well as it was possible for me to do. Shortly after Rosser's return from the New Creek expedition, Colonel Munford was sent with Wickham's brigade to the counties of Hardy and Pendleton, to procure forage for his horses, and, cold weather having now set in so as to prevent material operations in the field, the three divisions of the 2nd corps were sent, in succession, to General Lee,--Wharton's division, the cavalry, and most of the artillery being retained with me. On the 16th of December, I broke up the camp at New Market, and moved back towards Staunton, for the purpose of establishing my troops on or near Central Railroad-Lomax's cavalry, except one brigade left t
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 50: operations in 1865. (search)
of 1864 had made the corn crop in the Valley a very short one, and, as Sheridan had destroyed a considerable quantity of small grain and hay, I found it impossible to sustain the horses of my cavalry and artillery where they were, and forage could not be obtained from elsewhere. I was therefore compelled to send Fitz. Lee's two brigades to General Lee, and Lomax's cavalry was brought from across the Blue Ridge, where the country was exhausted of forage, and sent west into the counties of Pendleton, Highland, Bath, Alleghany and Greenbrier, where hay could be obtained. Rosser's brigade had to be temporarily disbanded, and the men allowed to go to their homes with their horses, to sustain them, with orders to report when called on,--one or two companies, whose homes were down the Valley, being required to picket and scout in front of New Market. The men and horses of Lieutenant Colonel King's artillery were sent to Southwestern Virginia to be wintered, and most of the horses of
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
Patterson's Creek, 332-33-34, 337 Patterson's Mountain, 334 Patton, Colonel G. W., 427 Patton's Brigade, 424, 425 Paxton, General, 175, 179 Payne, General, Wm. H., 416, 425, 433-34, 440-41, 446, 453-54, 457, 473 Peaks of Otter, 375, 376, 377 Pegram, General, 306, 311, 314-15, 345-46-47, 349, 350, 359, 362, 429, 430, 434, 438-39, 440-47, 449, 452 Pelham, Major, 176 Pender, General, 217, 236, 270, 274 Pendleton, Captain, 94 Pendleton, Colonel A. S., 217, 431 Pendleton County, 457, 459 Pendleton, General, 153, 162, 196, 198-204, 207, 209-10 Peninsular, 54, 57-58-59, 65 Penn, Colonel, 307, 309, 310 Penn, Major, 16, 203, 204 Pennsylvania, 46, 131, 159, 164, 236, 257, 259, 263, 264, 285-86-87, 306, 367, 401-02, 409, 414, 455 Perrin, General, 355 Perrin's Brigade, 355 Peters, Professor, Wm. E., 473, 474 Petersburg, Pa., 264 Petersburg, Va., 341, 359, 465-66, 474, 476 Petersburg, Western Virginia, 332-33, 335-338 Philadelphia, 255, 262, 386, 3
alty. The prisoners were defiant in their remarks, saying that they owed allegiance to the United States alone, etc. All three of them are Virginians by birth.--Richmond Dispatch, April 22. Gen. Milroy, at the head of a reconnoitring force, overtook the rear-guard of the rebel cavalry six miles west of the railroad, near Buffalo Gap, Augusta County, Western Virginia. They fled, rapidly pursued by the Nationals. Milroy learned that their main body stopped the previous night six miles beyond Buffalo Gap, but finding they were cut off at Staunton by Gen. Banks, they bore south-west, through both Bath and Alleghany Counties, toward the James River. A company that was sent by General Milroy down the north fork of the Potomac, in Pendleton County, captured eight rebels, including Barnett, a notorious guerrilla.--New York Commercial, April 25. The ship R. C. Files was captured by the National fleet, while attempting to run the blockade of Mobile, Ala.--New York Tribune, May 9.
ally, the Union party being reenforced, the rebels were driven off the field, and pursued for several miles, with great loss in killed and wounded. The National gunboats Hartford and Monongahela passed Warrenton, Miss., and anchored below Vicksburgh.--Major-General Edwin V. Summer died at Syracuse, N. Y., this morning.--The British steamer Nicholas I. was captured while attempting to run the blockade of Wilmington, N. C., by the gunboat Victoria.--A fight took place near Seneca, Pendleton County, Va., between a party of loyal men, called Swampers, and a force of rebels, resulting in the defeat of the Swampers. --Wheeling Intelligencer. A large force of Union troops, under the command of Generals Stuart and Sherman, in conjunction with the fleet of gunboats, under Admiral Porter, returned to the Yazoo, after a successful reconnoitring expedition to Steele's Bayou, Black Bayou, Muddy Bayou, and Deer Creek, Miss. In Deer Creek they were attacked in strong force by the enemy, b
Doc. 157.-battle at White Sulphur Springs, Virginia. Report of General Averill. Huttonsville, Va., Aug. 30, 1863. General: I have the honor to report the safe return of my command to this place, after an expedition through the counties of Hardy, Pendleton, Highland, Bath, Greenbrier, and Pocahontas. We drove General Jackson out of Pocahontas and over the Warm Spring Mountain, in a series of skirmishes, destroyed their saltpetre works, burned Camp Northwest and a large amount of arms, equipments, and stores. We fought a severe engagement with a superior force, under command of Major-General Sam Jones and Colonel Patten, at Rocky Gap, near the White Sulphur Springs. The battle lasted during two days. We drove the enemy from his first position, but want of ammunition, and the arrival, on the second day, of three regiments to reenforce the enemy, from the direction whence the cooperation of General Scammon had been promised, decided me to withdraw. My command was withdra
1 2 3 4 5