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viz.: to proceed to Corinth, Mississippi, by way of Salem and Ruckersville, capture any force that might be ththe cavalry to move to within three or four miles of Salem. Infantry marched to Lamar, eighteen miles from Lafle circumstances, could only make a few miles beyond Salem, and to regulate his march accordingly. Train arrivquarters to Widow Spight's house, two miles west of Salem, and Colonel Hoge's brigade of infantry to Robinson's house, four miles from Salem (west). Sunday, June 5.--Infantry and train started at half-past 4 A. M., and joined the cavalry, two miles east of Salem, at 10 A. M.; issued rations to the cavalry, and fed the forage che Saulsbury and Ripley and the Ruckersville and the Salem roads. Cavalry moved to Ruckersville. The advance en o'clock the column was again put in motion on the Salem road, the cavalry in advance, followed by infantry. ut checking the rebel advance, it retreated down the Salem road. The column was then moved out of Ripley, an
the men had thrown away their arms during the retreat, and that those who had arms were short of ammunition. I was directed by General Sturgis to move out on the Salem road, in rear of the First brigade of cavalry, then in advance. Before the troops all left the town of Ripley the enemy made a furious attack upon the place, gainn took up the line of march. Hearing at the cross-roads, where I halted for an hour, that the enemy in force was falling upon a large detachment of our men on the Salem road, and that a large cavalry force was about three miles in our rear, and being almost out of ammunition, I concluded to follow the Salisbury road, and toward eving was joined by Captain Foster, Fifty-ninth regiment A. D., with about six hundred of his own and the Fifty-fifth regiment A. D., he having crossed over from the Salem road, which he considered unsafe. That night we bivouacked near Brooks', about five miles from Salisbury. The next morning at daylight we resumed the march, and
with twenty days light rations carried on pack-mules. The whole command moved east, along the Memphis and Charleston railroad, threatening Corinth, to a point three miles west of Moscow, from thence south-east through Early Grove, Lamar, and Salem, to Ripley. From Early Grove the Tenth Missouri cavalry, under Captain F. K. Neet, was sent to La Grange and Grand Junction, and destroyed the telegraph and stations at those points, rejoining the column near Salem. From Ripley a detachment oSalem. From Ripley a detachment of one hundred and fifty men of the Second New Jersey, under Major Van Rensselaer, was sent to destroy the Mobile and Ohio railroad and the telegraph at or near Boonville. At the same time the Fourth Illinois, under Captain A. F. Search, was sent to destroy the same road near Guntown. These detachments rejoined the main column, one at Ellistown, the other at Shannon's station, having destroyed four bridges, eight or ten culverts, several miles of the track and telegraph, and a large quantity o
ore effectively. That night our army, with its trains and material, was quietly withdrawn, retiring by the Bedford turnpike, through Liberty and Buford's Gap to Salem, on the Virginia and Tennessee railroad. This retrogade from our hazardous position was accomplished without loss and with but little annoyance from the enemy. From Liberty to Salem, our route lay along the line of the railroad, which we destroyed as we moved, arriving at Salem about sunrise on the morning of the twenty-first of June. After a short halt, we took the road across the mountains to the Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs, via New Castle and Sweet Springs, arriving at the White SSalem about sunrise on the morning of the twenty-first of June. After a short halt, we took the road across the mountains to the Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs, via New Castle and Sweet Springs, arriving at the White Sulphur on the afternoon of the twenty-fourth. This move into the mountains was necessary to disembarrass ourselves of the enemy's cavalry, which had overtaken and followed us from Liberty, hanging upon our rear and harassing our flanks; without doing us much actual damage, however. After we entered the mountains, they disappear
where supplies were obtained in abundance, after which he changed his course toward South-western Virginia. A detachment was sent to Wytheville, and another to Salem, to destroy the enemy's depots at those places, and the railroad, while the main body marched on Christianburg and captured the place. The railroad to the eastwartured that place after some fighting, and burned the railroad bridges over New river and several creeks, as well as the depots of supplies. The detachment sent to Salem did the same, and proceeded to within four miles of Lynchburg, destroying as they advanced. A railroad was never more thoroughly dismantled than was the East Teand between Greensboroa and the Yadkin river, which was most thoroughly accomplished, after some fighting, by which we captured about four hundred prisoners. At Salem, seven thousand bales of cotton were burned by our forces. From Germantown the main body moved south to Salisbury, where they found about three thousand of the
le country for miles shone the light of these traces of our devastating march. As the command was at breakfast on the morning of the twenty-first, in and around Salem, the rebels made a fierce attack on the rear, with both musketry and shells. A brigade being sent back to assist in covering the retreat into the valley at the fotry from the roadside greeted them, and killed fifteen and wounded several. Since then they have been very cautious of any too near approach to our columns. At Salem we turned north on the road over Catawba Mountain to Newcastle, and on the night of the twenty-third we encamped at Sweet Springs, in whose beautiful grounds of ol as being thus brutally despoiled were Mrs. Poindexter, General Clay, Captain Armistead, Doctor Floyd, and N. W. Barksdale, on and near the Forest road; and on the Salem road, Samuel Miller, Major G. C. Hutter, and Doctor W. Owen. There were also others of whose names we have not been informed; and along the entire line of the ene
valry were beating back a superior force, that the weary footmen might rest. And this was done by the Second division, for the other was already far on its way to Salem. Marching his division all that night and holding it in line of battle all the next day, the evening of the twentieth found General Averell hurrying on to Salem, Salem, picketing the roads, and ensuring a safe march to the trains and worn-out column. At Salem the division repulsed a fierce attack on the right flank of the retreating army, and while so engaged their commander received notice of the most serious disaster of the campaign. By gross neglect of the orders of General Averell a byroad hSalem the division repulsed a fierce attack on the right flank of the retreating army, and while so engaged their commander received notice of the most serious disaster of the campaign. By gross neglect of the orders of General Averell a byroad had been left without a picket, and the enemy suddenly advancing upon it, attacked the artillery and captured ten pieces, but Averell moved his division quickly to the spot and in fifteen minutes, by a gallant charge, had recaptured the guns with thirty prisoners, losing, however, forty men in killed and wounded. Now rumors became