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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 118 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 106 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 79 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 59 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 52 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 48 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 39 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) or search for Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
e, the little resources it offered, the scarcity of railroads, the lack of large streams, were obstacles the more serious as the number of Texans enlisted in the Confederate armies could leave no doubt as to the sentiments of the majority of the population. These difficulties were better understood at New Orleans than at Washington. General Halleck had recommended Banks to penetrate into Texas by way of the northeast, going up along the Red River as far as Natchitoches, or even as far as Shreveport; he expected that he could thus be supported —at quite a distance, it is true—by the expedition Steele was about to lead into the heart of Arkansas. But that would have been pushing the little invading army into the poorest part of the State, and wantonly removing it from its base of operations. Banks preferred, with good reason, to establish this base by the sea, where the mouths of rivers and short railroads penetrating into the interior offered him good means of communication. But t
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
only by the secret agents who returned from Shreveport—whether some shrewd conversation carried on s to Vicksburg and to abandon the attempt on Shreveport if the campaign was to be prolonged ten or ftion of Red River, north in the direction of Shreveport, numerous communicating roads running througe, and finally, of taking a position as near Shreveport as was Pleasant Hill, and from which the marsolve to lead back the rest of his troops to Shreveport as a starting-point for a new campaign again, in that he left the pontons of the army at Shreveport. But it would have sufficed to avoid it hadications of the latter if he advanced toward Shreveport. After marching as far as Sabine River on tgton, on the direct road from Arkadelphia to Shreveport. His cavalry, divided between Generals Fagaf Washington, on the road from Fort Smith to Shreveport. The troops which Blunt had driven beyond commander, instead of entering the waters of Shreveport as conquerors, now found themselves in a ver[48 more...]