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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 244 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 223 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 214 4 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 179 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 154 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 148 20 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 114 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 109 27 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 94 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 80 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) or search for Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
ing parallel with and not crossing the road from Newport News to Williamsburg. It was also known that there were intrenched positions of mored Ship's Point, on or near the Hampton and Yorktown road, and at Williamsburg [see map, p. 188]. On my arrival at Fort Monroe, I learned, ito seize a point — near the Halfway House — between Yorktown and Williamsburg, where the Peninsula is reduced to a narrow neck, and thus cut oy water upon West Point, to force the evacuation of the lines at Williamsburg, and, if possible, cut off a portion of the enemy's force and tr was now divided: a part at the mouth of the Pamunkey, a part at Williamsburg, and a part at Yorktown prepared to ascend the York River. The back and close this gap. I rode briskly to the front, and on the Williamsburg road, where it passed between my two divisions, met General Sumnn--three divisions in all — were sharply attacked, mainly by the Williamsburg road; the fighting continued until between 8 and 9 P. M., the en<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
Yorktown and Williamsburg. Recollections of a private.--Iii. Warren Lee Goss. Wagon train. It wasJohnston's rear-guard about noon, six miles from Williamsburg, and skirmished with the cavalry of Stuart, folln he was confronted by a line of redoubts before Williamsburg. The works consisted of a large fort (Magruder)e junction of two roads running from Yorktown to Williamsburg, and small redoubts on each side of this, makings column, and, immediately on the arrival before Williamsburg, formed the brigades of Hancock and Brooks for alt to penetrate. A mile away lay the village of Williamsburg. We were soon sent out as skirmishers, with rom time to time to countermarch to the field at Williamsburg, relieving those whose ammunition was exhausted y Hooker earlier in the day. The heavy losses at Williamsburg fell upon Hooker and Kearny, the division of themorning we marched through quaint, old-fashioned Williamsburg. The most substantial buildings of the town wer
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. The composition, losses, and strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union forces. Major-General George B. McClellan. Brigadier-General Edwin V. Sumner, second in command. Third Army Corps, Brigadier-General Samuel P. Heintzelman. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Joseph Hookerison; 5th S. C.. Col. John R. R. Giles; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Col. Micah Jenkins, Lieut.-Col. Joseph Walker; La. Foot Rifles, Capt. McG. Goodwyn; Fauquier (Va.) Artillery, Capt. Robert M. Stribling; Williamsburg (Va.) Artillery, (2 guns), Capt. William R. Garrett; Richmond (Va.), Howitzers (2 guns), Capt. Edward S. McCarthy. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 75; m, 6 ==91. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George E. Pickett: 8th Va., Lieut.-Col. Norbourne Berkeley; 18th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Confederate use of subterranean shells on the Peninsula. (search)
water, in the shade of trees, at the foot of telegraph poles, and, lastly, quite within the defenses of the place — in the very streets. On the march from Williamsburg toward Richmond General Longstreet wrote to General G. J. Rains, whose brigade was on duty as rear-guard: It is the desire of the major-general commanding pons alluded to, to destroy assailants and prevent escalade. Subsequently, with a similar view, they were placed at spots I never saw. . . . And again when, at Williamsburg, we were ordered to turn upon our assailants and combat them, . . . some 6 or 7 miles this side of Williamsburg, my command forming the rear-guard of the army,Williamsburg, my command forming the rear-guard of the army, . . . some 4 small shells, found abandoned by our artillery, were hastily prepared by my efforts, and put in the road near a tree felled across, mainly to have a moral effect in checking the advance of the enemy (for they were too small to do more). . . . [Compare p. 205.] Editor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
Mr. Davis's only notice of the conflict at Williamsburg, in which our troops behaved admirably, relrly's account of his attack upon Hancock at Williamsburg: He [Early] confidently expresses the o and occupied Fort Magruder and the town of Williamsburg, which was filled with the enemy's wounded.d other Confederate earth-works in front of Williamsburg. From sketches made May 6, 1862. William and Mary College, Williamsburg, used as a Union hospital. our last interview, seems to me to requirr divisions to D. H. Hill's position on the Williamsburg road, and G. W. Smith to march with his to et, as ranking officer of the troops on the Williamsburg road, was instructed verbally to form D. H.n them, I left the immediate control on the Williamsburg road to them, under general instructions, aeceived orders to conduct his troops to the Williamsburg road. On entering it, he was ordered to thend of the action. Among the killed on the Williamsburg road were Colonels Moore, of Alabama, Jones[7 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
19,580; Engineers, Cavalry and Provost Guard, 4767. Each corps was composed of two divisions of nearly equal strength. The aggregate present for duty in the three Union Corps that were engaged was 51,543. The number in close action on the Williamsburg road, May 31st, was about 11,853, with full complement of artillery; these included 4253 in Casey's division, about 4000 in Couch's division, and about 3600 in Kearny's division. Near Fair Oaks, there were engaged about 9000, with 10 pieces oimated), 4000, and Huger's division (estimated), 5008. One of the five brigades of D. H. Hill's division was detached before May 31st. The aggregate of the 4 Confederate divisions engaged was about 39,000. The number in close action on the Williamsburg road, May 31st, was about 9520, with 2 batteries — including 7580 in D. H. Hill's division, and 1950 of Longstreet's division. Near Fair Oaks, 4 brigades of G. W. Smith's division (under Whiting), 8670; no artillery. The number of Confeder
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
at Longstreet's division was to move to the Williamsburg road and support D. H. Hill's division on tichmond; G. Wa. Smith's division was on the Williamsburg road, and north of it, two or three miles fs. From the edge of the wood, south of the Williamsburg road, Rains's brigade commenced firing on tresisted in their brilliant movement to the Williamsburg road, in rear of the Federal second line ofeived, and this time to countermarch to the Williamsburg road and follow on in rear of the troops th expecting to hear that the fighting on the Williamsburg road had commenced. In my official report reinforcements direct to Longstreet on the Williamsburg road. I adopted the latter course, and reql the command of the three divisions on the Williamsburg road; much less did I know, or even suspectof battle across and at right angles to the Williamsburg road about half a mile east of Seven Pines, of Richmond; this division remained on the Williamsburg road, more than a mile in advance of Hill's[53 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., I.--General Johnston to the rescue. (search)
teams, 3 were in fair condition for service, but the fourth was notoriously weak. When the general's order was read, I became very anxious about this team, especially as nothing is considered more humiliating to a battery than to have to part with a portion of its equipment, no matter what the cause may be; so that when the retreat was commenced the next morning I endeavored to keep all the men of my section well in hand, and ready to assist at a moment's notice. For six miles north of Williamsburg the entire army was falling back over a single road, and as there had been frequent rains, this road was badly cut up, and the mud in many places was up to the axles of the auns. Finally my weak team balked with the gun — a 1 2-pounder Napoleon — in a deep hole. Every effort was made by the drivers to dislodge the gun, but without avail; and I found when I got to the wheels, with as many men as could be utilized, that the horses could not be made to work in concert. The whole line to t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. by Daniel H. Hill, Lieutenant-General, C. S. A. W'at War Dey Fightin‘ ‘Bout! hile encamped, about noon on Monday, the 23d of June, 1862, on the Williamsburg road, about a mile from the battle-field of Seven Pines, in command of a division of the Confederate army, I received an order from General Lee to report immediately at his quarters on the Mechanicsville road. On approaching the house which the general occupied, I saw an officer leaning ovethe single regiment left in the town by General Porter, withdrew before the enemy to the strong position beyond the creek. Editors. than those of us lower down the stream. On the 25th there was a brisk fight about King's school-house on the Williamsburg road, between Hooker's division and parts of the divisions of Generals T. H. Holmes and Benjamin Huger. That night my division marched across to the neighborhood of Mechanicsville Bridge. To conceal the movement our camp-fires were freshly l
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
uth of the railroad, and between it and the Williamsburg road, was another clearing, east of which wntzelman's troops to be; on the left of the Williamsburg road was timber also, and General Smith's ds took position in the clearing between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. Burns's brigade of at a point in the timber in front near the Williamsburg road, where the enemy's infantry had by thiood. A Confederate battery placed near the Williamsburg road was compelled to withdraw in haste. OCorps, moved forward, with its right on the Williamsburg road, against a force of the enemy that was me forward to occupy the space between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. Thinking that two rnts not enough to extend across between the Williamsburg road and the railroad. I sent an aide in h Minnesota on the left to extend across the Williamsburg road, the battle began. My right flank sweem into line (about 250 men), facing up the Williamsburg road, which was raked by the grape and cani[3 more...]
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