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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 244 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 223 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 214 4 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 179 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 154 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 148 20 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 114 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 109 27 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 94 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 80 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) or search for Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
d strengthening the lines of defence around Williamsburg by the engagement of his rear-guard on the ; and on entering the forts and the town of Williamsburg the day after the important battle, it had or sixty thousand men who were assembled in Williamsburg on the 6th and 7th. It was found necessa of the Federals in the lines of defence at Williamsburg, the remainder was disposed en echelon on techelon along the road between Richmond and Williamsburg, from Bottom's Bridge to the clearing of Se Chickahominy, a few kilometres below. The Williamsburg road and the West Point railway, after croshe evening Hooker had again struck into the Williamsburg road, while Richardson had joined Sedgwick spatched Hooker's division on the road from Williamsburg to Richmond, beyond the positions occupied ge of such a blunder. They advanced by the Williamsburg road and along the railroad track, precededot occupied in force the wood bordering the Williamsburg road, and Franklin, finding no enemy in sig[29 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
possible, and of having ably conducted it when it became necessary. The loss of so important a position was not the less a serious check for the Confederates; it led to that of Memphis, and of all that section of railroad which connects these two points, securing to the Federals a new and solid base of operations. Besides, Halleck might follow the example of the army of the Potomac, which, on the very day following the evacuation of Yorktown, had been able to overtake its adversaries at Williamsburg. But he only sent in pursuit of the Confederates a few detachments of cavalry, which gave up the chase on reaching the borders of the Tuscumbia River, a few kilometres from Corinth. Beauregard left his advanced posts on this water-course until the 2d of June, for the purpose of rallying the stragglers, while he assembled his several corps in the neighborhood of Baldwin, only fifty kilometres from Corinth; here he remained until the 7th. Pope, reinforced by one of Buell's divisions,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
Clellan, to show the latter how much he had been mistaken in advancing by way of Yorktown and Williamsburg. The Federal troops destined to operate against the Confederate capital were, therefore, divthe march. The road to be followed by the army lay parallel to the James, and connected near Williamsburg with that by which the Federals had advanced a few months before. The enemy was only able tod so manfully struggled, was sadly retracing his steps over the road which was to lead him to Williamsburg, Yorktown, Newport News, the theatre of the first incidents of this campaign, which had begunthrough the fatal blindness of his superiors. On the same day, August 16th, Porter reached Williamsburg, where he was to wait for the remainder of the army; but having been informed, through an intville, and the day following, precisely at the same hour that McClellan was proceeding toward Williamsburg, Jackson was proceeding once more in the direction of Cedar Mountain. Before crossing the Ra
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VI:—Virginia. (search)
im. Burnside, whose loyalty and patriotism were always above suspicion, immediately tendered his resignation to the President. It was not accepted, but Newton and Cochrane were retained in the posts they occupied. It was in the midst of these painful circumstances that the army of the Potomac witnessed the close of the year 1862, the first of its active existence:--this year, which was marked by so many memorable events-by the siege of Yorktown, the comparatively successful battles of Williamsburg and Fair Oaks, the sanguinary but honorable defeats of Gaines' Mill and Glendale, and the success of Malvern Hill-this year, which had witnessed the disaster of Manassas, the fatal capitulation of Harper's Ferry, the victories of South Mountain and Antietam, and which had closed with the terrible defeat of Fredericksburg. For the Confederate army of Northern Virginia, on the contrary, the year 1863 opened under the best auspices. Thanks to the despotic energy of the Richmond government
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
2d Division, Smith. 1st Brigade, Hancock; 2d Brigade, Brooks; 3d Brigade, Davidson. 6th corps, F. Porter; 19,960 men strong. 1st Division, Morrell. 1st Brigade, Martindale; 2d Brigade, Griffin; 3d Brigade, Butterfield. 2d Division,Sykes. 1st Brigade (regular), Major Russell; 2d Brigade, Warren. Independent Division, McCall; 9514 men. (Pennsylvania Reserves.) 1st Brigade, Reynolds; 2d Brigade, Meade; 3d Brigade, Seymour. Iii. Report of the Confederate army at Williamsburg and Fair Oaks. We are not in possession of official documents to prepare full statements of the reports prior to the 26th of June, 1862, and can only give the following outline. On the 4th of May the army under Johnston at Yorktown, numbering about 55,000 men, was divided into four divisions: 1st, Magruder; 4 brigades, under D. R. Jones. 2d, G. Smith; 8 brigades, under Wilcox, A. P. Hill, Pickett, Colston, Hampton, Hood, Hatton and Whiting. 3d, D. H. Hill; 4 brigades, under