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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 175 17 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 69 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 61 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 48 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 42 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 32 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for York, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
k. Early passed through Gettysburg without opposition, on the 26th, and reached York on the 27th. While the requisitions made by Early upon the authorities at York,York, were being complied with, Gordon with his brigade was dispatched to Wrightsville, on the 28th, to secure the Columbia bridge over the Susquehanna, his purpose being,uth of the Conewago. Had Stuart been twenty-four hours earlier and met Early at York, the whole situation would have been changed, and Meade's dispositions made, upoore and Harrisburg Railroad (Northern Central). Early's demonstration towards York, caused Meade's inclination to the right, but when informed from Washington that to go along with him. Early says that orders recalling him were received at York on the 29th. As these came through Ewell, who was thirty miles distant at Carlhat he proceeds to say, I was directed to move on this road, in the direction of York, and to cross the Susquehanna, menacing the communications of Harrisburg with Ph
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
n Elliott Johnson from riding from Carlisle to York, a distance of 36 miles, as Col. Mosby points oransmit General Lee's order to General Early at York. Then finally there is the improbability that rected to move on this road in the direction of York, and to cross the Susquehanna, menacing the com It is about 75 or 80 miles from Seneca ford to York, which could readily have been covered by Stuar could easily have reported to General Early at York (30 miles farther), before nightfall of the 29t decided instead to press on through Hanover to York he would have been able to effect a junction with General Early at York by the evening of the 29th, or the early morning of the 30th, and his superould then have been available in the march from York to Cashtown on the 30th, and in the operations s, p. 191, if Stuart had arrived on the 30th at York he could not have communicated with Lee. No, bhe rash advance of General Hill. Marching from York to Cashtown on the 30th, by way of Heidlersburg[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
ylvania, of course, my battery moved with Early's Division, and we finally, on June 2, 1863, landed in the Fair Grounds of York, without any incident worthy of mention here. In that city we were treated with much kindness by many of its citizens, ann his article in Scribner's of July 1903, refers to the fact that General Early levied a contribution upon the citizens of York to satisfy the urgent necessities of his men; but I do not know that he contracted to pay for these things some time afterd to Mr. Lincoln without any foundation. However, I think it was a fact that his men were more comfortable when they left York than when they entered. On the morning of June 30th, we left York and moved along the turnpike towards Heddlersburg. AYork and moved along the turnpike towards Heddlersburg. After resting that night near that village, Early's Division, with Lieutenant-Colonel Hilary P. Jones' Battalion of Artillery accompanying it, marched toward Gettysburg, which was south of us, and near which we could hear the roar of the battle, in wh