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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 10 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Master Anthony Jenkinson, made from the citie of Mosco in Russia , to the citie of Boghar in Bactria , in the yeere 1558: written by himself to the Merchants of London of the Moscovie companie. (search)
. And the next day he sent for me again, and asked of me divers questions, as wel touching the affaires of the Emperour of Russia, as of our countrey and lawes, to which I answered as I thought good: so that at my departure he gave me his letters of safe conduct. This Castle of Sellizure is. situated upon an high hill, where the King called the Can lyeth, whose palace is built of earth very basely, and not strong: the people are but poore, and have litle trade of marchandise among them. The South part of this Castle is lowe lande, but very fruitfull, where grow many good fruites, among which there is one called a Dynie, of a great bignesse and full of moysture, which the people doe eate after meate in steade of drinke. Also there growes another fruite called a Carbuse of the bignesse of a great cucumber, yellow and sweete as sugar: also a certaine corne called Iegur, whose stalke is much like a sugar cane, and as high, and the graine like rice, which groweth at the toppe of the can
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
e: and the Sea (sayth he in the same place) as it goeth further, so is it found deeper. Into what gulfe doe the Moscovian rivers Onega, Duina, Ob, powre out their streames Northward out of Moscovia into the sea? Which way doeth that sea strike? The South is maine land, the Easterne coast waxeth more and more shalow: from the North, either naturally, because that part of the earth is higher Aristot. 2 Met. cap. 1. or of necessitie, for that the forcible influence of some Northerne starres cauery good road among great store of Isles, the countrey low land, pleasant and very full of fayre woods. To the North of this place eight leagues, we had a perfect hope of the passage, finding a mightie great sea passing betweene two lands West. The South land to our judgement being nothing but Isles: we greatly desired to goe into this sea, but the winde was directly against us. We ankered in foure fathome fine sand. In this place is foule and fish mightie store. The sixt of September havi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine other reasons, or arguments to proove a passage by the Northwest, learnedly written by M. Richard Willes Gentleman. (search)
ely that America and Asia cannot be one continent, may thus be proved, Kara 7'7}v yM'5 ys9 KotAorrVTra pet KcaT rTv wor0aJowv ro 7rX^Oos. The most Rivers take downe that way their course, where the earth is most hollow and deepe, writeth Aristotle: and the Sea (sayth he in the same place) as it goeth further, so is it found deeper. Into what gulfe doe the Moscovian rivers Onega, Duina, Ob, powre out their streames Northward out of Moscovia into the sea? Which way doeth that sea strike? The South is maine land, the Easterne coast waxeth more and more shalow: from the North, either naturally, because that part of the earth is higher Aristot. 2 Met. cap. 1. or of necessitie, for that the forcible influence of some Northerne starres causeth the earth there to shake off the Sea, as some Philosophers doe thinke: or finally for the great store of waters engendred in that frostie and colde climate, that the bankes are not able to holde them. Alber. in 2. Meteor. cap. 6. From the North,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage attempted by M. John Davis with others, for the discovery of the Northwest passage, in Anno 1586. (search)
t ever I sawe, and divers fisher men that were with me sayd that they never saw a more suavle or better skull of fish in their lives: yet had they seene great abundance. The fourth of September at five a clocke in the afternoone we ankered in a very good road among great store of Isles, the countrey low land, pleasant and very full of fayre woods. To the North of this place eight leagues, we had a perfect hope of the passage, finding a mightie great sea passing betweene two lands West. The South land to our judgement being nothing but Isles: we greatly desired to goe into this sea, but the winde was directly against us. We ankered in foure fathome fine sand. In this place is foule and fish mightie store. The sixt of September having a faire Northnorthwest winde, having trimmed our Barke we purposed to depart, and sent five of our sailers yong men a shore to an Island, to fetch certaine fish which we purposed to weather, and therefore left it al night covered upon the Isle: th