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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 146 18 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 64 36 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 54 4 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 52 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 46 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 40 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 37 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 28 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 20 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for Bentonville (North Carolina, United States) or search for Bentonville (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Marching through Georgia and the Carolinas. (search)
of Davis's corps was thrown upon their right, while we pressed them closely. As we passed over their dead and wounded, I came upon the body of a very young officer, whose handsome, refined face attracted my attention. While the line of battle swept past me I knelt at his side for a moment. His buttons bore the arms of South Carolina. Evidently we were fighting the Charleston chivalry. Sunset found us in bivouac on the Goldsboro' road, and Hardee in retreat. As we trudged on toward Bentonville, distant sounds told plainly that the head of the column was engaged. We hurried to the front and went into action, connecting with Davis's corps. Little opposition having been expected, the distance between our wing and the right wing had been allowed to increase beyond supporting distance in the endeavor to find easier roads for marching as well as for transporting the wounded. The scope of this paper precludes a description of the battle of Bentonville, which was a combination of mi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. (search)
Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. by Henry W. Slocum, Major-General, U. S. V. General sherman's army commenced its march from Atlanta to the sea on the morning of November 15th, and arrived in front of the defenses of Savannah on the 10th of December, 1864. No news had been received from the North during this inte, skirmishing most of the way with the enemy. On the 21st General Johnston found Sherman's army united, and in position on three sides of him. On the other was Mill Creek. Our troops were pressed closely to the works of the enemy, and the entire day was spent in skirmishing. During the night of the 21st the enemy crossed Mill CMill Creek and retreated toward Raleigh. The plans of the enemy to surprise us and destroy our army in detail were well formed and well executed, and would have been more successful had not the men of the Fourteenth and Twentieth corps been veterans, and the equals in courage and endurance of any soldiers of this or any other country.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
ivers's Bridge, S. C.1870 88 Near Kinston, N. C572659351257 Averysboro‘, N. C.77477 554 Bentonville, N. C.19111682871646 The Confederate Army. as constituted after April 9th, upon which dat T. Beauregard (Second in command). Escort: Capt. E. M. Holloway. Hardee's Corps, At Bentonville consisted of the divisions of Hoke, McLaws, and W. B. Taliaferro. Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws apt. C. M. Hall. Cheatham's division, All the troops of Cheatham's old corps engaged at Bentonville were commanded by Maj.-Gen. W. B. Bate. Maj.-Gen. B. F. Cheatham. Palmer's Brigade, Brig.-r; S. C. Battery, Capt. H. M. Stuart; Ga. Battery, Capt. J. F. Wheaton. Lee's Corps, At Bentonville consisted of Stevenson's, Clayton's, and Hill's divisions, commanded by Maj.-Gen. D. H. Hill.ed, and 16 captured or missing = 134. The loss at Averysboro' is estimated at about 700. At Bentonville it was 239 killed, 1694 wounded, and 673 captured or missing = 2606. With regard to the latt
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of Bentonville. (search)
ing about two miles south of the little hamlet of Bentonville, where the road from. Smithfield intersected thaave said, at Smithfield, about sixteen miles from Bentonville, and I replied at once, telling him that the Fourthe fight. That night General Johnston reached Bentonville, as did a part of his command; but Hardee's trooperal Johnston had established his headquarters at Bentonville I reported to him, giving him all the information . . . As soon as General Hardee's troops reached Bentonville next morning we moved by the left flank, Hoke's dorable and brilliant record, and had joined me at Bentonville just in time to render efficient service in the lenses, and behind us was a deep and rapid stream [Mill Creek] over which there was but one bridge, which gave — was held along a small stream which flowed into Mill Creek, and this was held only by cavalry videttes stati for that night. Johnston withdrew safely across Mill Creek, where he camped two miles beyond the bridge.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
Final operations of Sherman's Army. see page 681 to page 705.--editors. by H. W. Slocum, Major-General, U. S. V. From Bentonville [March 22d, 1865] we marched to Goldsboro‘, and in two or three days were in camp, busily engaged in preparing for another campaign. We had made the march from Savannah to Goldsboro‘, a distance of 430 miles, in seven weeks. We had constructed bridges across the Edisto, Broad, Catawba, Pedee, and Cape Fear rivers, and had destroyed all the railroads to the interior of South Carolina. We had subsisted mainly upon the country, and our men and animals were in better condition than when we left Savannah. All this was done in the winter season. We found Goldsboro' already occupied by our troops, the Twenty-third Corps, under General Schofield, and the Tenth Corps, under General Terry, having captured Wilmington and arrived at Goldsboro' a day or two in advance of us. After the fall of Wilmington, Feb. 22d, 1865, General Schofield sent a column,