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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 197 89 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 32 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 30 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 3 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 16 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 16, 1860., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Covington (Kentucky, United States) or search for Covington (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

aged. Forty rebels were found dead upon the field and forty-four wounded. Lyon's loss was nine killed and thirty wounded.--(Doc. 154.) The Congress of the United States passed the Tariff and Direct Tax Bill, providing for a direct tax of twenty millions of dollars.--N. Y. Herald, August 3. Four companies of the Second Ohio Volunteers arrived at Cincinnati this morning from Washington. The reception was the grandest demonstration ever witnessed in Cincinnati. The Home Guards of Covington and Newport, Ky., and the reserve militia and independent regiments of Cincinnati, were out in large force, and escorted the volunteers through some of the principal streets to the Eighth-street Park, where they were welcomed home by Judge Storer in an eloquent address. They afterward partook of a banquet in the Park, provided by the citizens. All along the line of march the streets were densely crowded, and the enthusiasm unbounded. The volunteers were completely covered with the bouqu
nation, Mr. Johnston bade farewell to his friends, and was conveyed to Moyamensing prison in charge of the officers.--N. Y. Commercial, August 26. All the large craft, schooners, and sloops, and small, rowboats and skiffs on the Potomac River, were seized by the Government authorities.--N. Y. Herald, August 27. A Union man named Moore was killed, and another named Neill mortally wounded, this afternoon, by a gang of five secessionists, at Shotwell Toll-gate, Ky., seven miles from Covington. Both men were stabbed in the back. A party of Unionists gave pursuit to the murderers, who fled toward the Tennessee line.--N. Y. Times, August 27. Wm. Halsey, hailing from Ithaca, N. Y., was waited upon by a party of citizens at his hotel, in Scranton, Pa., and requested to leave town in three hours, or accept the alternative of riding out on a rail. He had given provocation beyond endurance, by endeavoring to induce parties to take the New York Day Book, and by uttering the rank
tance of ten miles. On arriving at the bridge, another party of rebels were encountered, who, after a short fight, were dispersed. Besides destroying the bridge, the Unionists cut the telegraph wire and destroyed the battery at the station.--(Doc. 149.) A party of rebel guerrillas entered Memphis, Mo., captured the militia troops stationed there, drove out the Union men, and robbed the stores. Great excitement existed in Louisville, Lexington, Bowling Green, Danville, Frankfort, Covington, and other towns in Kentucky, in anticipation of a visit from the rebel guerrillas under John Morgan. In order to be prepared for such an event, General Boyle, commanding the Union forces at Louisville, issued the following order: It is ordered that every able-bodied man take arms and aid in repelling the marauders. Every man who does not join will remain in his house forty-eight hours, and be shot down if he leaves it. General Ward, commanding at Lexington, issued an order directing th
ing into the field all the able-bodied men in the county of Jefferson and city of Louisville, and the Mayor called upon the citizens to come forward and enroll themselves for the immediate defence of their city. The public archives were removed from Frankfort to Louisville, and the Legislature adjourned to the same place. Lexington, Ky., was entered and occupied by the rebel forces under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. The Union troops evacuated the place a few hours previous, and fell back to Covington.--Natchez, Miss., was shelled by the Union gunboats. Yesterday the rebels commenced an attack upon the National forces at Stevenson, Ala., which continued until to-day, when the rebels retired with a severe loss. The fight was brought on by the National forces, which had just evacuated Huntsville, and were on their way to Nashville, Tenn. The batteries engaged were Simonton's Ohio and one section of Loomis's Michigan regiments. They were supported by the Tenth Wisconsin and Thirteen
The following order was issued from the War Department at Washington: By direction of the President, Major-General McClellan will have command of the fortifications at Washington, and of all the troops for the defence of the capital. --Gen. Wright, commanding Department of the Ohio, issued an order from his headquarters at Louisville, Ky., proclaiming Jefferson County in that State, to be under martial law. The greatest excitement existed in the cities of Cincinnati, Ohio, Covington and Newport, Ky., in consequence of the reported approach of the rebel army under Gen. E. Kirby Smith. General Wallace assumed command, and issued a proclamation declaring those cities to be under martial law. All business was suspended. Saloons were closed and liquor of all kinds was forbidden to be sold. The ferry-boats were stopped. The inhabitants, including judges and clergymen, met in public places, formed themselves into companies, and began to drill in readiness for military dut
the complete rout of the rebels, with a loss of eight killed and twenty wounded. The National loss was one killed, one missing, and ten wounded.--Surgeon Martin's Report. Colonel George W. Berry, of the Harrison County home guards, left Covington, Ky., with six hundred of Colonel Tevis's cavalry, for the purpose of reconnoitring up the Kentucky Central Railroad as far as Falmouth. Before reaching Falmouth, the officer in command of the cavalry declined going any further, and started back toward Covington. Colonel Berry was not to be baffled in his enterprise in this way; so he pushed ahead, in company with Greenbury Reed, U. S. Marshal of Bourbon County, and nine other men, and reached Falmouth in a few hours, finding it evacuated by the rebels. The little band had not been there long when twenty-eight Texan Rangers came into the place, and immediately attacked Colonel Berry's small force. A desperate fight ensued, resulting in the rebels being driven out of the town with a