Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Westminster (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Westminster (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cotton, John 1585-1652 (search)
s non-conformity he was cited to appear before Archbishop Laud, when he fled to America, arriving in Boston in September, 1633. He was soon afterwards ordained a colleague with Mr. Wilson in the Boston Church. His ministry there for nineteen years was so influential that he has been called The patriarch of New England. He was a firm opponent of Roger Williams, and defended the authority of ministers and magistrates. He and Davenport were invited to assist in the assembly of divines at Westminster, but were dissuaded from going by Hooker. He died in Boston, Dec. 23, 1652. God's promise to his plantations.— The following sermon, to which a large historical importance has been given, was preached in England, as a farewell address to Winthrop's Massachusetts Company (see Winthrop, John), and the first London edition of it was published in 1630: 2 Sam. 7. 10. Moreover I will appoint a place for my people Israell, and I will plant them, that they may dwell in a place of their
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Government, instrument of. (search)
ng therein what is to be changed as aforesaid) to the several and respective sheriffs of England, Scotland, and Ireland, for summoning the Parliament to meet at Westminster, the third day of September next: and shall likewise, within seven days after the said first day of August, in every third year, to be accounted from the dissolment, seal, issue, and send forth abroad several writs of summons (changing therein what is to be changed) as aforesaid, for summoning the Parliament to meet at Westminster the sixth of November in that third year. That the said several and respective sheriffs, shall, within ten days after the receipt of such writ as aforesaid, caut by the Chancellor, Keeper, or Commissioners of the Great Seal; that then the Parliament shall, as often as such failure shall happen, assemble and be held at Westminster, in the usual place, at the time prefixed, in manner and by the means hereafter expressed; that is to say, that the sheriffs of the several and respective count
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hudson, Charles 1795-1881 (search)
Hudson, Charles 1795-1881 Author; born in Marlboro, Mass., Nov. 14, 1795; became a Universalist clergyman in 1819, and was pastor at Westminster, Mass., for twenty years; was a member of Congress in 1841-49. He was the author of History of Westminster; History of Lexington; Genealogical register of Lexington families. He also prepared congressional reports, including Protective policy; Capital punishment; The northeastern boundary; and The incompetency of witnesses on account of religiousoro, Mass., Nov. 14, 1795; became a Universalist clergyman in 1819, and was pastor at Westminster, Mass., for twenty years; was a member of Congress in 1841-49. He was the author of History of Westminster; History of Lexington; Genealogical register of Lexington families. He also prepared congressional reports, including Protective policy; Capital punishment; The northeastern boundary; and The incompetency of witnesses on account of religious belief. He died in Lexington, Mass., May 4, 1881.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Miles, Nelson Appleton 1839- (search)
Miles, Nelson Appleton 1839- Military officer; born in Westminster, Mass., Aug. 8, 1839; was engaged in mercantile business in Boston till the outbreak of the Civil War; entered the volunteer army as a captain in the 22d Massachusetts Infantry, Sept. 9, 1861; promoted lieutenant-colonel 61st New York Infantry, May 31, 1862, and colonel, Sept. 30 following; brigadiergeneral, May 12, 1864; major-general, Oct. 21, 1865; and was mustered out of the volunteers, Sept. 1, 1866. On July 28, 1866, he was commissioned colonel of the 40th United States Infantry; March 15, 1869, was transferred to the 5th Infantry; Dec. 15, 1880, promoted brigadier-general; April 5, 1890, major-general; June 6, 1900, lieutenant-general, under an act of Congress of that date; and Feb. 5, 1901, was appointed lieutenant-general under the law reorganizing the army. During the Civil War he distinguished himself at Fair Oaks (wounded), Malvern Hill, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville (wounded), Ream's Station, and