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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 76 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 19, 1862., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Sandusky, Ohio (Ohio, United States) or search for Sandusky, Ohio (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 42 results in 27 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
tt's HarborMay 29, 1813 Stony CreekJune 6, 1813 Hampton (Defence of)June 13, 1813 Craney IslandJune 22, 1813 Beaver DamsJune 23, 1813 Near Fort GeorgeJuly 8, 1813 Black RockJuly 11, 1813 Fort George (Defence of Outworks)July 17, 1813 Fort StephensonAug. 2, 1813 Stonington (Bombardment of)Aug. 9-11, 1813 Fort MimsAug. 30, 1813 ThamesOct. 5 1813 French CreekNov. 1 and 2, TallasehatcheNov. 3, 1813 TalladegaNov. 9, 1813 Chrysler's FieldNov. 11, 1813 Hillabee TownNov. 18, 1813 Autttt's HarborMay 29, 1813 Stony CreekJune 6, 1813 Hampton (Defence of)June 13, 1813 Craney IslandJune 22, 1813 Beaver DamsJune 23, 1813 Near Fort GeorgeJuly 8, 1813 Black RockJuly 11, 1813 Fort George (Defence of Outworks)July 17, 1813 Fort StephensonAug. 2, 1813 Stonington (Bombardment of)Aug. 9-11, 1813 Fort MimsAug. 30, 1813 ThamesOct. 5 1813 French CreekNov. 1 and 2, TallasehatcheNov. 3, 1813 TalladegaNov. 9, 1813 Chrysler's FieldNov. 11, 1813 Hillabee TownNov. 18, 1813 Autt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cayuga Indians, (search)
mposed of the families of the Turtle, Bear, and Wolf, like the other cantons, and also those of the Beaver, Snipe, Heron, and Hawk. They were represented in the congress of the league by ten sachems. Through Jesuit missionaries the French made fruitless attempts to Christianize the Cayugas and win them over to the French interest, but found them uniformly enemies. During the Revolutionary War the Cayugas were against the colonists. They fought the Virginians at Point Pleasant in 1774. They hung upon the flank and rear of the army under Sullivan that invaded the territory of the Senecas in 1779; but they soon had their own villages destroyed, which greatly annoyed them. After the war they ceded their lands to the State of New York, excepting a small reservation. In 1800 some of them joined the Senecas, some went to the Grand River in Canada, and some to Sandusky, O., whence they were removed to the Indian Territory (q. v.). In 1899 there were only 161 left at the New York agency.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
erates defeated.— 3. Mosby's guerillas routed at Warrenton Junction.—4. Admiral Porter takes possession of Fort de Russy, on Red River. —6. Confederates put to flight near Tupelo, Miss. Battle near Clinton, Miss.— 15. Corbin and Grau hung at Sandusky for recruiting within the Union lines.— 18. Democratic convention in New York City expresses sympathy with Vallandigham.—22-23. Battle of Gum Swamp, N. C., —28. First negro regiment from the North left Boston.—June 1. Democratic convention in Phnment in a speech in Georgia.—11. Lord Lyons, the British minister, officially informed the United States government of a contemplated Confederate raid from Canada, to destroy Buffalo, and liberate Confederate prisoners on Johnson's Island, near Sandusky. A fleet of French steamers arrived off Brazos, Tex.—15. Corpus Christi Pass, Tex., captured by National troops.—18. Mustang Island, Tex., captured by the Nationals.—19. Gettysburg battle-field consecrated as a national cemete
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cooke, Jay 1821- (search)
Cooke, Jay 1821- Financier; born in Sandusky, O., Aug. 10, 1821; became a clerk in a banking-house in Philadelphia in 1838, and at the age of twenty-one became a partner. In 1861, he established in Philadelphia the banking firm of Jay Cooke & Co., and became widely known as a leading financier of the country, and as an agent of the government in negotiating large loans during the Civil War. His firm became agents for the Northern Pacific Railroad, and their suspension in 1873 was one of the causes of the great panic begun in that year. Mr. Cooke subsequently recovered his financial standing, and in 1901 was engaged in the banking business in Philadelphia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Croghan, George 1746-1782 (search)
securing the attachment of the Indians to the British interest until 1776, but took no active part in the events of the Revolution. He died in Passayunk, Pa., in August, 1782. Military officer; born near Louisville, Ky., Nov. 15, 1791; educated at the College of William and Mary, which he left in 1810; was aide to Colonel Boyd in the battle of Tippecanoe (q. v.) in 1811, and made captain of infantry in March, 1812. In March, 1813, he became an aide of General Harrison, and in August of the same year sustained the siege of Fort Stephenson (q. v.) against a force of British and Indians, for which he was brevetted a captain and awarded a gold medal by Congress. He was made lieutenant-colonel early in 1814, and resigned in 1817. Colonel Croghan was postmaster at New Orleans in 1824, and late in the next year was appointed inspector-general of the army, with the rank of colonel. He served under Taylor at the beginning of the war with Mexico. He died in New Orleans, Jan. 8, 1849.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Custom-house, (search)
chez, Shieldsborough, Vicksburg. Missouri—Kansas City, St. Joseph, St. Louis. Montana—Fort Benton. Nebraska—Omaha. New Hampshire—Portsmouth. New Jersey—Bridgeton, Newark, Perth Amboy, Somers Point, Trenton, Tuckerton. New York—Albany, Buffalo, Cape Vincent, Dunkirk, New York, Ogdensburg, Oswego, Patchogue, Plattsburg, Port Jefferson, Rochester, Sag Harbor, Suspension Bridge. North Carolina—Beaufort, Edenton, Newberne, Wilmington. Ohio–Cincinnati, Columbus, Cleveland, Sandusky, Toledo. Oregon–Astoria, Empire City, Portland, Yaquina. Pennsylvania–Erie, Philadelphia, Pittsburg. Rhode Island—Bristol, Newport, Providence. South Carolina—Beaufort, Charleston, Georgetown. Tennessee—Chattanooga, Memphis. Texas–Brownsville, Corpus Christi, Eagle Pass, El Paso, Galveston. Vermont—Burlington. Virginia—Alexandria, Cherry Stone, Newport News, Norfolk, Petersburg, Richmond, Tappahannock. Washington–Port Townsend. West V
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
igan won by Great Britain, though not for itself. There were those who foresaw that the acquisition of Canada was the prelude of American independence. Late in December Rogers returned to the Maumee; and, setting out from the point where Sandusky City now stands, crossed the Huron River to the northern branch of White Woman's River, and, passing thence by the English village of Beaverstown, and up the Ohio, reached Fort Pitt on Jan. 23, 1761, just a month after he left Detroit. Under th expedition, was called Stow Castle. At this time the white inhabitants west of the Genesee River and along the coasts of the lakes were as follows: the garrison at Niagara, two families at Lewiston, one at Buffalo, one at Cleveland, and one at Sandusky. There were no other families east of Detroit; :and, with the exception of a few adventurers at the Salt Springs of the Mahoning, the interior of New Connecticut was an unbroken wilderness. The work of surveying was commenced at once. One p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harrison, William Henry 1773-1812 (search)
ations the foot of the rapids (see Meigs, Fort). There were nearly 3,000 troops at St. Mary on Oct. 1. Fort Defiance, at the junction of the Maumee and Auglaize, was made a post of deposit for provisions, and a corps of observation was placed at Sandusky. The mounted Kentuckians were formed into a regiment, and Major Johnson was appointed its colonel; and these, with Ohio mounted men under Colonel Findlay, formed a brigade commanded by Gen. E. W. Tupper, of Ohio, who had raised about 1,000 meroy the British vessels frozen in the Detroit River near Amherstburg (Fort Malden). The ice in the vicinity had broken up, and the expedition was fruitless. The attack on Fort Meigs by the British and Indians followed in May. The attack on Fort Stephenson (see Stephenson, Fort) followed, and the summer of 1813 was passed in completing arrangements for the invasion of Canada. The veteran Isaac Shelby, then governor of Kentucky, joined Harrison at Camp Seneca, with about 4,000 mounted volunt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hunters' Lodges. (search)
n, who was called the Pirate of the thousand Islands, and was outlawed by the governments of the United States and Great Britain. These secret organizations were called Hunters' Lodges. Among their members were many Canadian refugees, and William Lyon Mackenzie, the chief agitator in Upper Canada, who had been driven from the province, organized an executive committee in Buffalo, N. Y., for the purpose of directing the invasion of Canada. These Hunters' Lodges organized invading parties at Detroit, Sandusky, Oswego, and Watertown, in northern New York, and in Vermont. At one time, Van Rensselaer and Johnson had under them about 2,000 men, at an island a little below Kingston, Canada, It is said that the Hunters' Lodges within the American lines numbered, at one time, nearly 1,200, with a membership of 80,000. They were kept up after the insurrection was crushed and its leaders were hanged, imprisoned, or exiled. Hunters' Lodges were suppressed by order of President Tyler in 1842.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Internal improvements. (search)
he States had a right to sell the awards, and from the proceeds they were to repay the government. On the same day (March, 1827) there was granted to Indiana a certain strip of land formerly held by the Pottawattomie Indians, the proceeds of the sale thereof to be applied to building a road front Lake Michigan, via Indianapolis, to some convenient point on the Ohio River. March 3, 1827, a grant was made to Ohio of two sections of land along the entire line of a road to be constructed from Sandusky to Columbus. May 23, 1828, a grant of 400,000 acres of the relinquished lands in certain counties in Alabama was made in aid of the improvement of the Tennessee and other rivers in that State. In this grant was the first provision for indemnity in case the grant was not full by reason of prior sales or disposals by the government. Similar grants were made from time to time for like purposes. March 2, 1833, the State of Illinois was authorized to apply the lands granted by the act of M
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