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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 45 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 27 7 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 25 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 14 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Fort Hamilton (Ohio, United States) or search for Fort Hamilton (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ball's Bluff and the arrest of General Stone. (search)
s P. Stone, a native of Massachusetts, a graduate with honors of the United States Military Academy, a distinguished officer of the ordnance corps during the Mexican war, colonel of the 14th regular infantry, and brigadier-general of volunteers, commanding a division of ten thousand men in the Army of the Potomac, was arrested in Washington, by the commander of the provost guard, and sent, in custody of a lieutenant and two policemen, to Fort Lafayette, in New York harbor. There, and at Fort Hamilton, he was kept in close and solitary confinement, his pockets being emptied and his letters examined, until the 16th of August, when, after the lapse of 189 days, he was set at liberty, under the peremptory requirements of an act of Congress, approved July 17th, 1862, forbidding the detention of any officer or soldier more than thirty days without charges. It will be observed that he was held for a fresh period of thirty days before this law was allowed to operate, and it is also worth
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
l C. S. Hamilton. From a photograph. front. Hamilton's division of Rosecrans's corps was by this ts had meanwhile entered the town. Grant sent Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions with some cavalry ibrunt of the battle fell upon two brigades of Hamilton's division. The Union loss was 141 killed, 6d, by which Rosecrans with his two divisions (Hamilton's and Stanley's) was to move on Iuka from theton road open. A rapid march from Jacinto (Hamilton's division leading, Sanborn's brigade in the d without rifle-pits. To meet emergencies, Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions, which had been watgradually drawn in pretty close Stanley's and Hamilton's divisions. They had been kept watching to uld have crushed the enemy's right and rear. Hamilton's excuse that he could not understand the ordat lack of daylight, which would have brought Hamilton's fresh and gallant division on the Confederag away. At this time, while going to order Hamilton's division into action on the enemy's left, I[7 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
d without rifle-pits. To meet emergencies, Hamilton's and Stanley's divisions, which had been watgradually drawn in pretty close Stanley's and Hamilton's divisions. They had been kept watching to f the 3d found my troops disposed as follows: Hamilton's division, about 3700 strong, on the Purdy rided that it was a main attack of the enemy. Hamilton's division had been sent up the railroad as fthe line of the old Confederate works. Hence Hamilton's movement, the brigades advancing en ├ęchelonwest and had to rectify its position; so that Hamilton's division thus far had only given the enemy uld have crushed the enemy's right and rear. Hamilton's excuse that he could not understand the ordat lack of daylight, which would have brought Hamilton's fresh and gallant division on the Confederag away. At this time, while going to order Hamilton's division into action on the enemy's left, Id and dying were left on the porch. Reaching Hamilton's division I ordered him to send Sullivan's b
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hamilton's division at Corinth. (search)
Hamilton's division at Corinth. by Charles S. Hamilton, Major-General, U. S. V. The following order, issued about 9 A. M. on the first day of the battle of Corinth, fixed the position of my division: Corinth, Oct. 3d, 1862. Brigadier-General Hamilton, Commanding Third Division. General: The general commanding directs that you cover with your division the Purdy road, from the swamp on the railroad to where the road runs through the rebel works. By command of Major-General Rosecrans.--Goddard, A. A. A. General. P. S. You may perhaps have to move farther out, as Davies does not find good ground until he gets near the old rebel works, and he proposes to swing his right still farther around. By order of Major-General Rosecrans.--Goddard, A. A A. General. Again at 2 P. M. the same day the following circular was sent to both Hamilton and Davies: For fear of a misunderstanding in relation to my orders, I wish it distinctly understood that the extreme position is not to b