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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 74 4 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 60 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 12 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 10 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 5 1 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) or search for Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) in all documents.

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ty into the junto of Fox; but Fox himself was desponding. Walpole's Memoires. Bedford had his scheme, which he employed Rigby to establish; and when it proved impracticable, indulged himself in reproaches, and the display of Bedford Corr. II. 245. anger, and withdrew to Woburn Abbey. In the midst of war, the country was left to anarchy. We are undone, said Chesterfield; at home, by our increasing expenses; abroad, by ill-luck and incapacity; the Elector of Hesse, the Grand Duke of Brunswick, destitute of the common honesty of hirelings, were in the market to be bid for by the enemies of their lavish employer; the King of Prussia, Britain's only ally, seemed overwhelmed, Hanover reduced, and the French were masters in America. So dark an hour, so gloomy a prospect, England had not known during the century. But the mind of Pitt always inclined to hope. I am sure, said he to the Duke of Devonshire, I can save this country, and nobody else can. For eleven weeks England was
whole navies from hurricanes, whose position gives the command of the neighboring seas. From the continent of Europe came the joyous assurance, that a victory at Minden had protected Hanover. The French, having repulsed Prince Ferdinand of Brunswick at Frankfort, pursued their advantage, occupied Cassel, compelled Munster to capitulate, and took Minden by assault; so that Hanover could be saved only by a victory. Contades and Broglie, the French generals, with their superior force, were aheir foot the wings. The French cavalry charged, but, swept by artillery and the rolling fire of the English and Hanoverian infantry, they were repulsed. At the moment, Ferdinand, whose daring forethought had detached the hereditary prince of Brunswick with ten thousand men to cut off the retreat, sent a message to the commander of the British cavalry, Lord George Sackville, by a German aid-de-camp. Lord George affected not to understand. Ligonier came next, with express directions that he