Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Harford (Maryland, United States) or search for Harford (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
had been left at President Street Station, were in a deplorable dilemma. They were surrounded by a hostile and very angry crowd and were subjected to indignities and some violence. Some of them, seized with a panic, fled and dispersed through the city. During the night many of them straggled into the police stations and begged for protection. Those who remained in President Street Station were later on put on cars and hauled out of town toward Philadelphia. Some straggled as far as Harford county and were put in jail. Bridges on the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore and Northern Central roads were burned by order of the Mayor, with the assent of Governor Hicks, and all communication with the East and North was destroyed. Policemen and members of the Maryland Guard were sent out to do the work. The reason of this action was the conviction that if more troops had come through the city at that time, there would be great disturbances and bloodshed. Judge Bond, G. W. Dobbin and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
had been left at President Street Station, were in a deplorable dilemma. They were surrounded by a hostile and very angry crowd and were subjected to indignities and some violence. Some of them, seized with a panic, fled and dispersed through the city. During the night many of them straggled into the police stations and begged for protection. Those who remained in President Street Station were later on put on cars and hauled out of town toward Philadelphia. Some straggled as far as Harford county and were put in jail. Bridges on the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore and Northern Central roads were burned by order of the Mayor, with the assent of Governor Hicks, and all communication with the East and North was destroyed. Policemen and members of the Maryland Guard were sent out to do the work. The reason of this action was the conviction that if more troops had come through the city at that time, there would be great disturbances and bloodshed. Judge Bond, G. W. Dobbin and