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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 27, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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of the Confederate loan at several places in Georgia. It says that only $11,000,000 of the $15,000,000 have been subscribed for.--Nashville Union, June 28. General Banks at Fort McHenry issued a proclamation nullifying the protest and acts of the late police board of Baltimore.--(Doc. 52.) The Twenty-second Regiment N. Y. S. V., left Albany, N. Y., for the seat of war. The regiment is commanded by Colonel Walter Phelps, and is composed of men from the counties of Warren, Essex, Washington, and Saratoga. They belong to the class of hardy and industrious woodsmen, and intelligently understand the questions which underlie the present contest.--N. Y. Tribune, June 30. The First Regiment of New Jersey Volunteers left Trenton this morning for Washington in twenty-one cars, at 8 o'clock.--The Second and Third Regiments left this afternoon by way of the Camden and Amboy Railroad. The tents and other equipage which Quarter-master-General Perine had, under the direction of Gov
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 1: effect of the battle of Bull's Run.--reorganization of the Army of the Potomac.--Congress, and the council of the conspirators.--East Tennessee. (search)
the battle of Bull's Run.--reorganization of the Army of the Potomac.--Congress, and the council of the conspirators.--East Tennessee. Effect of the battle of Bull's Run, page 17. the story in both sections scenes in Richmond and in Washington a sad picture, 18. the story in Europe hopes and predictions of the ruling classes there relative position of the combatants, 19. another uprising of the people the exultation of the Confederates the United South, how formed, 20. suffer General N. P. Banks, then in command at Baltimore, was directed to take his place in charge of the Department of the Shenandoah, he being relieved by General John A. Dix. There was a new arrangement of Military Departments, The counties of Washington and Alleghany, in Maryland, were added to the Department of the Shenandoah, created on the 19th of July, with Headquarters in the field; and the remainder of Maryland, and all of Pennsylvania and Delaware, constituted the Department of Pennsylv
l troops across her soil; and not only forbid, but resist it. Baltimore was a Secession volcano in full eruption; while the counties south of that city were overwhelmingly in sympathy with the Slaveholders' Rebellion, and their few determined Unionists completely overawed and silenced. The counties near Baltimore, between that city and the Susquehanna, were actively cooperating with the Rebellion, or terrified into dumb submission to its behests. The great populous counties of Frederick, Washington, and Alleghany, composing Western Maryland--having few slaves — were preponderantly loyal; but they were overawed and paralyzed by the attitude of the rest of the State, and still more by the large force of rebel Virginians — said to be 5,000 strong — who had been suddenly pushed forward to Harper's Ferry, and who, though not in season to secure the arms and munitions there deposited, threatened Western Maryland from that commanding position. Thus, only the county of Cecil, in the extreme<
ey have received and are receiving large reenforcements from the South. Gen. Pope's army, now covering Washington, is only about 40.000. Your effective force is only about 90,000. You are about thirty miles from Richmond, and Gen. Pope eighty or ninety, with the enemy directly between you, ready to fall with his superior numbers upon one or the other, as lie may elect; neither can reenforce the other in case of such an attack. It Gen. Pope's army be diminished to reenforce you, Washington, Maryland, and Pennsylvania would be left uncovered and exposed. If your force be reduced to strengthen Pope, you would be too weak to even hold the position you now occupy, should the enemy turn around and attack you in full force. In other words, the old Army of the Potomac is split into two parts, with the entire force of the enemy directly between them. They cannot be united by land without exposing both to destruction; and yet they must be united. To send Pope's forces by water to the
Gen. McClellan was early apprised Sept. 3. of the disappearance of the Rebels from his front, and soon advised that they were crossing into Maryland. His several corps were accordingly brought across the Potomac and posted on the north of Washington; which city he left Sept. 7. in command of Gen. Banks, making his headquarters that night with the 6th corps, at Rockville. He moved slowly, because uncertain, as were his superiors, that the Rebel movement across the Potomac was not a feinerior force. Lee, in his eagerness to grasp the prize whereon he was intent, and in his confident assurance that McClellan would continue the cautious and hesitating movement of six or seven miles a day by which he had hitherto advanced from Washington, had pushed Longstreet forward on Jackson's track to Hagerstown, Sept. 11. whence six of his brigades, under Anderson, had been sent to cooperate with McLaws against Maryland Heights and Harper's Ferry. This left only D. H. Hill's division
ade, when a brigade more or less might decide the fate of a continent. Hooker had already drawn from the garrison at Washington all that Halleck would spare — leaving but 11,000 effectives under Heintzelman; which was noe too much. But, having cr27, 1853. Maj.-Gen. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief: My original instructions require me to cover Harper's Ferry and Washington. I have now imposed upon me, in addition, an enemy in my front of more than my numbers. I beg to be understood, respe instructed to await there further orders from the Adjutant-General's office. Three days bringing none, he went over to Washington; where he was forthwith arrested by Halleck for visiting the capital without leave, and in violation of the rule which 00 men from Maryland Heights, lie left 7,000 of them standing idle at Frederick, sending the residue as train-guards to Washington, and actually apologized to Halleck, on meeting him, for having moved them at all! Had Gettysburg been lost for want o
ard, and robbing passengers and mails. Early's cavalry advance reached Rockville on the evening of the 10th; his infantry was next day within 6 or 7 miles of Washington; which they actually menaced on the 12th. Gen. Augur, commanding the defenses, pushed out, toward evening, a strong reconnoissance to develop their strength; an routing them, with a loss of but 50 on our side; Averill capturing their guns, wagons, and 500 prisoners. Gen. Grant had already sent Aug. 2. Sheridan to Washington, with intent to have him placed in charge of our distracted operations on the Potomac and Shenandoah; and he now came up Aug. 4. himself, to obtain, if possider soon appeared Aug. 7. appointing Maj.-Gen. Philip H. Sheridan commander of the new Middle Department, composed of the late Departments of West Virginia, Washington, and Susquehanna; and two divisions of cavalry (Torbert's and Wilson's) were soon sent him by Grant; raising his force to nearly 30,000 men; while Early's, conf
received and are receiving large reenforcements from the South. Gen. Pope's army, now covering Washington, is only forty thousand. Your effective force is only about ninety thousand. You are thirty miles from Richmond, and General Pope eighty or ninety. With the enemy directly between you, ready to fall with his superior numbers upon one or the other, as he may elect, neither can reenforce the other in case of such an attack. If Gen. Pope's army be diminished to reenforce you, Washington, Maryland, and Pennsylvania would be left uncovered and exposed. If your forces be reduced to strengthen Pope, you would be too weak to even hold the position you occupy, should the enemy turn round and attack you in full force. In other words, the old army of the Potomac is split into two parts, with the entire force of the enemy directly between them. They cannot be united by land without exposing both to destruction, and yet they must be united. To send Pope's forces by water to the Peni
Rodenbough Union soldier with two horses. The first experiment: seventh New York cavalry, 1862 The men on dress parade here, in 1862, are much smarter, with their band and white gloves, their immaculate uniforms and horses all of one color, than the troopers in the field a year later. It was not known at that time how important a part the cavalry was to play in the great war. The organization of this three months regiment was reluctantly authorized by the War Department in Washington. These are the Seventh New York Cavalry, the Black horse, organized at Troy, mustered in November 6, 1861, and mustered out March 31, 1862. They were designated by the State authorities Second Regiment Cavalry on November 18, 1861, but the designation was changed by the War Department to the Seventh New York Cavalry. The seven companies left for Washington, D. C., November 23, 1861, and remained on duty there till the following March. The regiment was honorably discharged, and many of
Federal guns in the grand review before the capitol, May 24, 1865: artillery Brigade in the grand review It was the artillery that defended Washington, as told in Chapter I of this volume. It was heavy artillery turned into infantry which sustained the greatest loss in battle — the First Maine and Eighth New York. On every hard-fought open field, it was the artillery that put heart into the infantry, supporting the charge or covering the retreat. No wonder a roar of applause went up on that sunny day in May, while the caissons clanked down Pennsylvania Avenue, and made the cannon rumble again in their bronze and iron throats
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