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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 27, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for Washington county (Maryland, United States) or search for Washington county (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: Whetting the sword. (search)
before, at which place they had been left, awaiting the order of Captain Brown. There were, also, other stores, consisting of blankets, clothing, boots, ammunition, and about two hundred revolvers of the Massachusetts Arms patent, all of which we transported across the State of Iowa to Springdale, and from there to Liberty, at which place they were shipped for Ashtabula County, Ohio, where they remained till brought to Chambersburg, Pa., and were from there transported to a house in Washington County, Md., which Captain Brown had rented for six months, and which was situated about five miles from Harper's Ferry. It was the intention of Captain Brown to sell his teams in Springdale, and, with the proceeds, to go on with the rest of the company to some place in Ashtabula County, Ohio, where we were to have a good military instructor during the winter; but he was disappointed in the sale. As he could not get cash for the teams, it was decided we should remain in the neighborhood of Spr
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 10: spoils of war. (search)
party, consisting of several members of the Grays, (the only foreign corps in the town, quite or nearly all of those present in the forenoon having left for their homes,) some score or more of volunteers, and about twenty United States marines, under command of Capt. J. E. B. Stewart, was instantly formed. and proceeded rapidly in pursuit. Following the same path which the Grays had pursued in making their discoveries, and which is known as the County road, leading into the heart of Washington Co., Md., the party continued their course for a distance of 4 1/2 miles from the Ferry, until they reached the farm and house bought and occupied by Brown, under the name of John Smith. The dwelling — a log house containing two unpaved basement rooms, used apparently for storage, and in which were several empty gun boxes; two rooms and a pantry upon the second floor; and one large attic room in which were six husk mattresses — was discovered to be unoccupied, save by a huge savage-looking ma