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Pausanias, Description of Greece 34 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 12 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 4 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 4 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
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Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 773 (search)
Chorus The son of Atreus, encircling Pergamus, the Phrygians' town, with murderous war around her stone-built towers, dragging Paris's head backward to cut his throat and sacking the city from roof to base, shall be a cause of many tears to maids and Priam's wife. And Helen, the daughter of Zeus, shall weep in bitter grief because she left her lord. Never may there appear to me or to my children's children the prospect which the wealthy Lydian ladies and Phrygia's brides will have as at their looms they converse: “Tell me, who will pluck me away from my ruined country, tightening his grasp on lovely tresses till the tears flow? it is all through you, the offspring of the long-necked swan; if indeed it is a true report that Leda bore you to a winged bird, when Zeus transformed himself there, or whether, in the tablets of the poets, fables have carried these tales to men's ears idly, out of season
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1060 (search)
Chorus So then you have delivered into Achaea's hand, O Zeus, your shrine in Ilium and your fragrant altar, the offerings of burnt sacrifice with smoke of myrrh to heaven uprising, and holy Pergamos, and glens of Ida tangled with the ivy's growth, where rills of melting snow pour down their flood, a holy sun-lit land that bounds the world and takes the god's first rays!
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1287 (search)
Hecuba Woe! oh woe! Son of Cronos, prince of Phrygia, father of our race, do you behold our sufferings now, unworthy of the stock of Dardanus? Chorus He sees them, but our mighty city is a city no more, and Troy's day is done. Hecuba Woe! oh woe! Ilium is ablaze; the homes of Pergamos and its towering walls are now one sheet of flame. Chorus As the smoke soars on wings to heaven, so sinks our city to the ground before the spear. With furious haste both fire and enemy spear devour each house.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 149 (search)
Those are the Ionian cities, and these are the Aeolian: Cyme (called “Phriconian”),Perhaps so called from a mountain in Aeolis, Phricion, near which the Aeolians had been settled before their migration to Asia. Lerisae, Neon Teichos, Temnos, Cilla, Notion, Aegiroessa, Pitane, Aegaeae, Myrina, Gryneia.These places lie between Smyrna and Pergamum, on or near the coast. But Aegiroessa has not been exactly identified. These are the ancient Aeolian cities, eleven in number; but one of them, Smyrna, was taken away by the Ionians; for these too were once twelve, on the mainland. These Aeolians had settled where the land was better than the Ionian territory, but the climate was not so goo
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 112 (search)
After passing through the aforementioned land, Xerxes next passed the fortresses of the Pierians, one called Phagres and the other Pergamus. By going this way he marched right under their walls, keeping on his right the great and high Pangaean range, where the Pierians and Odomanti and especially the Satrae have gold and silver mines.
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 4 (search)
against the Gauls, but terrible shapes as armed warriors haunted the foreigners. They say that two of them, Hyperochus and Amadocus, came from the Hyperboreans, and that the third was Pyrrhus son of Achilles. Because of this help in battle the Delphians sacrifice to Pyrrhus as to a hero, although formerly they held even his tomb in dishonor, as being that of an enemy. The greater number of the Gauls crossed over to Asia by ship and plundered its coasts. Some time after, the inhabitants of Pergamus, that was called of old Teuthrania, drove the Gauls into it from the sea. Now this people occupied the country on the farther side of the river Sangarius capturing Ancyra, a city of the Phrygians, which Midas son of Gordius had founded in former time. And the anchor, which Midas found,A legend invented to explain the name “Ancyra,” which means anchor. was even as late as my time in the sanctuary of Zeus, as well as a spring called the Spring of Midas, water from which they say Midas mixed
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 5 (search)
re is no way for a mortal to overstep what the deity thinks fit to send. They say that Tereus, though wedded to Procne, dishonored Philomela, thereby transgressing Greek custom, and further, having mangled the body of the damsel, constrained the women to avenge her. There is another statue, well worth seeing, of Pandion on the Acropolis. These are the Athenian eponymoi who belong to the ancients. And of later date than these they have tribes named after the following, AttalusThis king of Pergamus visited Athens in 200 B.C. in the company of the Roman ambassadors, and was treated with every mark of respect by the Athenians. the Mysian and Ptolemy the Egyptian,It is uncertain to which of the many kings of Egypt called by this name Pausanias refers. and within my own time the emperor Hadrian117-138 A.D., who was extremely religious in the respect he paid to the deity and contributed very much to the happiness of his various subjects. He never voluntarily entered upon a war, but he red
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 10 (search)
ith her her children and her brothers, who were taking refuge with Ptolemy and finally adopted this course. They were accompanied on their flight to Seleucus by Alexander who was the son of Lysimachus by an Odrysian woman. So they going up to Babylon entreated Seleucus to make war on Lysimachus. And at the same time Philetaerus, to whom the property of Lysimachus had been entrusted, aggrieved at the death of Agathocles and suspicious of the treatment he would receive at the hands of Arsinoe, seized Pergamus on the Caicus, and sending a herald offered both the property and himself to Seleucus. Lysimachus hearing of all these things lost no time in crossing into Asia281 B.C., and assuming the initiative met Seleucus, suffered a severe defeat and was killed. Alexander, his son by the Odrysian woman, after interceding long with Lysandra, won his body and afterwards carried it to the Chersonesus and buried it, where his grave is still to be seen between the village of Cardia and Pactye.
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 11 (search)
to return to Thessaly, but sailing to Epeirus dwelt there because of the oracles of Helenus. By Hermione Pyrrhus had no child, but by Andromache he had Molossus, Pielus, and Pergamus, who was the youngest. Helenus also had a son, Cestrinus, being married to Andromache after the murder of Pyrrhus at Delphi. Helenus on his death passed on the kingdom to Molossus, son of Pyrrhus, so that Cestrinus with volunteers from the Epeirots took possession of the region beyond the river Thyamis, while Pergamus crossed into Asia and killed Areius, despot in Teuthrania, who fought with him in single combat for his kingdom, and gave his name to the city which is still called after him. To Andromache, who accompanied him, there is still a shrine in the city. Pielus remained behind in Epeirus, and to him as ancestor Pyrrhus, the son of Aeacides, and his fathers traced their descent, and not to Molossus. Down to Alcetas, son of Tharypus, Epeirus too was under one king. But the sons of Alcetas after a
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Corinth, chapter 26 (search)
l this day of the festival Epidauria, and they allege that their worship of Asclepius dates from then. Again, when Archias, son of Aristaechmus, was healed in Epidauria after spraining himself while hunting about Pindasus, he brought the cult to Pergamus. From the one at Pergamus has been built in our own day the sanctuary of Asclepius by the sea at Smyrna. Further, at Balagrae of the Cyreneans there is an Asclepius called Healer, who like the others came from Epidaurus. From the one at Cyrene wPergamus has been built in our own day the sanctuary of Asclepius by the sea at Smyrna. Further, at Balagrae of the Cyreneans there is an Asclepius called Healer, who like the others came from Epidaurus. From the one at Cyrene was founded the sanctuary of Asclepius at Lebene, in Crete. There is this difference between the Cyreneans and the Epidaurians, that whereas the former sacrifice goats, it is against the custom of the Epidaurians to do so. That Asclepius was considered a god from the first, and did not receive the title only in course of time, I infer from several signs, including the evidence of Homer, who makes Agamemnon say about Machaon:—Talthybius, with all speed go summon me hither Machaon,Mortal son of Asc
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