hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 34 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 12 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 6 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 4 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 4 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley). You can also browse the collection for Pergamus (Turkey) or search for Pergamus (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 149 (search)
Those are the Ionian cities, and these are the Aeolian: Cyme (called “Phriconian”),Perhaps so called from a mountain in Aeolis, Phricion, near which the Aeolians had been settled before their migration to Asia. Lerisae, Neon Teichos, Temnos, Cilla, Notion, Aegiroessa, Pitane, Aegaeae, Myrina, Gryneia.These places lie between Smyrna and Pergamum, on or near the coast. But Aegiroessa has not been exactly identified. These are the ancient Aeolian cities, eleven in number; but one of them, Smyrna, was taken away by the Ionians; for these too were once twelve, on the mainland. These Aeolians had settled where the land was better than the Ionian territory, but the climate was not so goo
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 112 (search)
After passing through the aforementioned land, Xerxes next passed the fortresses of the Pierians, one called Phagres and the other Pergamus. By going this way he marched right under their walls, keeping on his right the great and high Pangaean range, where the Pierians and Odomanti and especially the Satrae have gold and silver mines.