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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 102 6 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 12 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 1, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 21: Mr. Davis's first session in Congress. (search)
sed to the idea of sectional conflict for private advantage, and favoring the wider expanse of our Union. If envy and jealousy and sectional strife are eating like rust into the bonds which our fathers expected to bind us, they come from causes which our Southern atmosphere has never furnished. As we have shared in the toils, so we have gloried in the triumphs of our country. In our hearts, as in our history, are mingled the names of Concord, and Camden, and Saratoga, and Lexington, and Plattsburg, and Chippewa, and Erie, and Moultrie, and New Orleans, and Yorktown, and Bunker Hill. Grouped together, they form a record of the triumphs of our cause, a monument of the common glory of our Union. What Southern man would wish it less by one of the Northern names of which it is composed? Or where is he who, gazing on the obelisk that rises from the ground made sacred by the blood of Warren, would feel his patriot's pride suppressed by local jealousy? Type of the men, the event, the pu
, and a black felt hat, according to the army regulation. Corporal Hayes and twelve men belonging to Col. Wallace's regiment of Zouaves, while scouting on Patterson's Creek, twelve miles east of Cumberland, Md., encountered a party of rebels numbering about forty. A sharp engagement ensued. Seventeen of the enemy were killed, and a number wounded. One of Hayes's party was killed, and himself badly wounded.--(Doc. 45.) The Sixteenth Regiment N. Y. S. V. passed through New York en route to the seat of war. Before leaving the city the regiment was presented with a regimental flag by the wife of G. Howland. The dress of the soldiers is of the United States army pattern, and all the officers wear the regulation uniform, with felt hats and plumes. The commander of the regiment, Col. Thomas A. Davies, is a graduate of West Point, and served in the war with Mexico. The men are volunteers from the region of country about Albany, and northward as far as Plattsburgh.--(Doc. 46.)
October 27. Brigadier-General Wm. H. T. Walker, of the Confederate States Army, resigned his position this day, because, despite all his claims as a soldier who has seen service, and as among the first to offer themselves to the South, he finds that he is continually over-slaughed by new appointments.--Richmond Whig. A fight took place at Plattsburgh, Clinton County, Mo., fifteen miles south of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad. A force of seven hundred Union men attacked and captured a camp of rebels, killing eight of them, capturing twelve prisoners, one cannon, and a lot of small-arms.--Leavenworth Conservative.
May 21. A band of guerrillas who day before yesterday plundered the town of Richmond, Mo., this day visited Plattsburgh, in the same State, and carried off eleven thousand dollars belonging to the State, beside committing other depredations. The Mobile Register of this date said: We are informed by the Mayor that the British subjects residing in Mobile have formed a company, known as the British Consular Guards, commanded by F. J. Helton, Captain, and have offered their services to the Mayor to aid in the preservation of the good order of the city in case of insurrection, invasion, inundation, devastation by fire, or any other duty not inconsistent with the retaining of their original nationality. Last night a large steamer was discovered by the gunboat Powhatan, coming out of Charleston by the North channel. She was fired at repeatedly, and finally driven back; but before she reached the bar again the Powhatan's fire, and that of two or three other blockaders that h
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 6: military Polity—The means of national defence best suited to the character and condition of a country, with a brief account of those adopted by the several European powers. (search)
litia to march beyond the lines of their own states, and of the New-York militia to cross the Niagara and secure a victory already won; or the disgraceful flight of the Southern militia from the field of Bladensburg. But there is another side to this picture. If our militia have frequently failed to maintain. their ground when drawn up in the open field, we can point with pride to their brave and successful defence of Charleston, Mobile, New Orleans, Fort McHenry, Stonington, Niagara, Plattsburg, in proof of what may be accomplished by militia in connection with fortifications. These examples from our history must fully demonstrate the great value of a militia when properly employed as a defence against invasion, and ought to silence the sneers of those who would abolish this arm of defence as utterly use-less. In the open field militia cannot in general be manoeuvred to advantage; whereas, in the defence of fortified places, their superior intelligence and activity not unfreq
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 8: our northern frontier defences.—Brief description of the fortifications on the frontier, and an analysis of our northern campaigns. (search)
y Frederick, and practised and improved by Napoleon, the central and interior line, under all ordinary circumstances, will furnish the greatest probabilities of success. If the line of Lake Champlain is, as we have endeavored to show, the most important line in the north, its security by fortifications is a matter of the greatest interest. The works recommended by the Board, consist of a single fort, costing $600,000, at Rouse's Point, on the extreme frontier, and unfortified depots at Plattsburg and Albany. But is this sufficient to accomplish the object? If the hostile army should pass the extreme frontier barrier, what is to retard his advance,--what defensive works are to protect the debouche of the Northern canal, or even to save the great central depot? We know of no foreign engineer who has recommended less than three lines of fortifications for the security of a land frontier; and Napoleon, the Archduke Charles, and General Jomini, agree in recommending at least this num
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army, Appendix. Oration at West Point. (search)
the history of the Revolution, and a perusal of the despatches of Washington, will convince the most skeptical of the value of the permanent army in achieving our independence and establishing the civil edifice which we are now fighting to preserve. The War of 1812 found the army on a footing far from adequate to the emergency; but it was rapidly increased, and of the new generation of soldiers many proved equal to the requirements of the occasion. Lundy's Lane, Chippewa, Queenstown, Plattsburgh, New Orleans,--all bear witness to the gallantry of the regulars. Then came an interval of more than thirty years of external peace, marked by many changes in the organization and strength of the regular army, and broken at times by tedious and bloody Indian wars. Of these the most remarkable were the Black Hawk War, in which our troops met unflinchingly a foe as relentless and far more destructive than the Indians,--that terrible scourge, the cholera; and the tedious Florida War, whe
Albany, N. Y., May 3.--The Northern spirit is illustrated by the following incidents :--A few days since, a company from Ogdensburgh came without orders, the first knowledge of the existence of the company being their presence at Albany. They were inspected and mustered in. Next day, another company from the North Woods came in the same way. Next day, Frank Palmer's company, from Plattsburgh, telegraphed that they were coming, unless forbidden. They arrived, 95 men, immediately after. Yesterday the newspapers gave notice of the Depeyster company, Capt. Curtis, coming. It arrived today, giving the first notice of its existence to the Department. This evening, Capt. Bartlett's company, from Odgensburgh, came the same way. It will be inspected and mustered here. Three hundred and eighty companies are required for the 30,000. To-day there were 415 companies entered.--N. Y. Tribune, May 4.
ch, and counter; Leave forge, and desk, and field; Leave axe, and spade, and hammer, For weaker hands to wiel Come from Penobscot's pine-clad banks, Where the hardy woodman's axe Hurls crashing down the giant tree Upon the bear's fresh tracks; From the clustered hills of granite, Crowned with the noble name Of him, whose home dishonored Has left to us his fame; From where Ticonderoga Looks out on blue Champlain; From the green shores of Erie, The field of Lundy's Lane; From Bennington and Plattsburg, From Saratoga's plain, From every field of battle Where honored dead remain. Up, Massachusetts! seize the sword That won calm peace and free ; Ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem. 'Tis thine, still thine, to lead the way Through blood to Liberty. On Narragansett's busy shores, Remember gallant Greene; And ye, whose fathers oft he led, Bold Putnam's courage keen. Through the broad Western prairies, The mighty river pours Its swollen floods resistless On subject Southern shores.
lbert, song by, P. 106 Pillow, Gideon, Gen., Prentiss' reply to, P. 28; Brownlow's answer to, P. 129; Epigram on, P. 149 Pinckney, —, Colonel N. Y. 6th Regiment, ancedote, of, P. 71 Piqua, O., patriotism of, D. 29 Pittsburg, Pa., indignation meeting at, in reference to the removal of arms, D. 6; Union resolutions of, D. 6; Union meeting at, D. 25; war excitement at, D. 30; contraband notice at, D. 55 Piracy — defined by Judge sprague, of Mass., D. 71 Plattsburg, N. Y., P. 81 Plymley, Jonathan, on contraband, P. 68 Point of Rocks, Md., D. 96 Poisoning troops, D. 101 Political Lessons of the Hour. Wendell Phillip's Address, D. 15 Poore, —, Capt., commander of the Brooklyn, D. 84 Porter, George M., D. 57 Porterfield, S. A., Col., proclamation of, to the people of North-Western Virginia, Doc. 324, 344 Portland, Me., Union at, D. 16; attempt on powder-house at, D. 52 Postal affairs, Southern opinions of, D<
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