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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
have no idea myself that he will attempt any more invasions of Maryland, the last having proved the most lamentable failure, both politically and in a military sense. Our army is stretched along the banks of the Potomac from Harper's Ferry to Williamsport. My corps was under orders yesterday to march to Harper's Ferry, but the order was countermanded before the time for moving came. I saw your brother Willie yesterday; he is quite well, but greatly disgusted in not having been in any of the r63. We came here yesterday afternoon to sustain Pleasanton, who has had several brilliant skirmishes with the enemy's cavalry in this vicinity, and who thought they were bringing up infantry. To-day we hear Ewell has crossed the Potomac at Williamsport. This indicates an invasion of Maryland, of which I have hitherto been skeptical. If this should prove true, we will have to rush after them. I had almost rather they would come here and save us marches. I am in pretty good spirits—a littl
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
25th the corps of Generals Longstreet and Hill had crossed the Potomac; that of the former at Williamsport, of the latter at Shepardstown. Concentrating at Hagerstown, they marched on Chambersburg, wtysburg. But Gettysburg, although somewhat more distant than Chambersburg from Lee's base at Williamsport, had for him the inestimable advantage, in view of the then position of the Army of the Potomac, of rendering secure his line of communication with Williamsport. His marching on Gettysburg meant the maintenance of the invasion. He was compelled, under the circumstances of Meade's advance, temy's side of the mountains, and just beyond the circumference of the circle, is not far from Williamsport, on the Potomac, his base of supplies. Meade's Headquarters, at Taneytown, had lain betweenvalry was spread out on both flanks of the army. Buford's division was between Boonsboro and Williamsport, with Kilpatrick's division and one brigade of Gregg's division on its right. One brigade of
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
advance to secure an easy victory. I had great responsibility thrown on me: on one side were the known and important fruits of victory, and on the other, the equally important and terrible consequences of defeat. I considered my position at Williamsport very different from that at Gettysburg. When I left Frederick it was with the firm determination to attack and fight Lee without regard to time or place as soon as I could come in contact with him. But, after defeating him and requiring him tt in time it will tell on them, but as yet they show no evidences of it. I feel a satisfaction in knowing that my record is clear, and that the results of this campaign are the clearest indications I could wish of my sound judgment, both at Williamsport and Mine Run. In every instance that we have attacked the enemy in an entrenched position we have failed, except in the case of Hancock's attack at Spottsylvania, which was a surprise discreditable to the enemy. So, likewise, whenever the en
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 9 (search)
een. From all I can gather the enemy extends from Hagerstown to Williamsport covering the march of their trains. Their cavalry and infantry dispatch. His whole force is in position between Funkstown and Williamsport. I have just received information that he has driven in my cav the impression that Lee's whole force is between Hagerstown and Williamsport, with an advance at Middleburg, on the road to Greencastle, obsefrom Boonsboro towards the centre of the line from Hagerstown to Williamsport, my left flank looking to the river, and my right towards the mo lines, who reported the enemy's army all between Hagerstown and Williamsport; that they have brought up a bridge from Winchester, which is now thrown across at Williamsport; that they are using this bridge, not to cross their forces, but to bring over supplies; that the men are in fadvancing on a line perpendicular to the line from Hagerstown to Williamsport, and the Army will this evening occupy a position extending from
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 17 (search)
finding his ammunition exhausted and his subsistence imperilled, decided to withdraw, and he began his retreat towards Williamsport, with four thousand of our prisoners and all his immense trains. On the morning of the 5th this event became known, an succoring the wounded and burying the dead. The enemy made good use of all this precious time in pushing on towards Williamsport, as rapidly as possible, and it was fortunate for them that detachments were not detailed for these solemn and affectiotomac, but his army never. The trains, with the wounded and prisoners, says Lee's report, were compelled to await at Williamsport (about the 8th of July) the subsiding of the river and the construction of boats. * * * the enemy had not yet made hiseade, it was ascertained he (the enemy) had retired the night previous by the bridge at Falling Waters and the ford at Williamsport. In striking confirmation of the sketch now given of this important battle it may be interesting to quote a few bri
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix O (search)
cently appeared before the Committee on the Conduct of the War. The evidence of General Butterfield, Chief of Staff to General Meade, is known to be so ruinous to the reputation of the Commander of the Army of the Potomac that it will be a singular indifference to public opinion on the part of the government if he is allowed to remain longer in that important post. It has been most conclusively proved that nothing was easier than to force Lee's whole army to an unconditional surrender at Williamsport, where he was without ammunition or subsistence, and the swollen Potomac preventing his escape. It was stated that our army was so humiliated at the vacillation and timidity of General Meade on this occasion that many of them shed tears and talked of throwing down their arms. Yet General Meade still commands this noble army, and not only that, but he has lately ventured to break up, under shallow pretexts two of its finest corps, and dismiss some of its most heroic officers, Pleasanton,
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 24 (search)
ign frustrated—and all because one general, whose incompetence, indecision, half-heartedness in the war have again and again been demonstrated, is still unaccountably to hamper and hamstring the purposes of the lieutenant-general. Let us chasten our impatient hope of victory so long as Gen. Meade retains his hold on the gallant Army of the Potomac; but let us tell the truth of him. He is the general who at Gettysburg bore off the laurels which belonged to Howard and to Hancock; who at Williamsport suffered a beaten army to escape him; who, when holding the line of the Rapidan, fled before Lee without a battle to the gates of the capital; who at Mine Run drew back in dismay from a conflict which he had invited and which his army longed to convert into triumph; who, in the campaign from the Rapidan to the James under Grant, annulled the genius of his chief by his own executive incapacity; who lost the prize of Petersburg by martinet delay on the south bank of the James; who lost it a
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
s the mountain during the battle, which had penetrated as far as Williamsport, where they partially destroyed or rendered ineffective a pontooins had been brought from Winchester and crossed on the ferry at Williamsport for the supply of General Lee's army; and from the character of ve information that ammunition trains had been ferried across at Williamsport; and my opinion is now that General Lee evacuated that position,tains, but before the day that I advanced to attack the enemy at Williamsport, I received notice of troops arriving both at Frederick and at He army when I took command of it, I was in front of the enemy at Williamsport with very much the same army that I moved from Gettysburg. Question: The enemy recrossed the river at Williamsport? Answer: Yes, sir. Question: Go on with your narrative, if you please. Answer: Wh Answer: Certainly. That is what I was trying to accomplish at Williamsport, but he fell back too soon for me; he got back to the river and
L., II, 87, 88. Willcox, Col., I, 232, 244. Willcox, Gen., I, 324. Williams, A. S., I, 329; II, 55, 56, 64, 65, 88, 90, 91, 93, 95, 98, 163, 304, 409, 410, 415, 419, 422. Williams, J. M., II, 90, 91. Williams, John W., I, 266, 322, 356. Williams, Seth, I, 197, 299, 302, 308, 310, 337; II, 10, 15, 16, 17, 31, 37, 38, 40, 121, 123, 128, 163, 184, 304, 352, 382, 383, 387, 388, 393, 394, 413-415, 420, 422. Williams, W. G., I, 111, 112, 115, 117, 123, 135, 144, 209. Williamsport, Md., July, 1863, II, 134,140, 201, 363, 364, 366, 372. Willings, I, 9. Wilmer, Mr., II, 151. Wilson, Senator, I, 379; II, 161, 165, 256, 257, 343, 344. Winegar, C. E., II, 99. Winslow, G. B., II, 79. Winsor, Harry, I, 384. Wise, Mrs. Henry A., I, 199. Wise, Mrs., II, 278. Wise, Geo. D., II, 206. Wise, Henry A., I, 17, 96, 139, 140, 245; II, 205, 238, 259, 270. Wise, John, II, 261. Wise, Nene, II, 277. Wise, Oby, I, 246. Wise, Peyton, II, 206, 238.