Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Brandenburg (Kentucky, United States) or search for Brandenburg (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
the Federal enterprise was only excelled by the brilliancy of the Confederate success. But now, when the Federal infantry was advancing, General Morgan executed a movement for the diversion of the enemy, which in its conception and details constituted the most remarkable cavalry exploit of the war. Moving to the rear of Rosecrans with his cavalry division of 2,500 men, he crossed the Cumberland river at Burkes-ville on the 2d of July, passed through Columbia, Lebanon and Bardstown to Brandenburg, forty miles below Louisville, and there on the 8th crossed the Ohio into Indiana, drawing after him large bodies of Federal cavalry and infantry and having a number of heavy engagements. Thence he swept through Corydon, Salem and other towns, until on the 13th he was in the vicinity of Cincinnati, having captured many troops, and with the hue and cry of two States raised against him. He was pursued and sought to be headed by large bodies of the enemy's cavalry and infantry, drawn from a
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
services he was, on the suggestion of General Bragg, commissioned brigadier-general December 11, 1862. His exploits made it necessary to garrison every important town in Kentucky and Southern Ohio and Indiana. His most wonderful exploit was the great raid through those States from the 2d to the 20th of July, 1863. With about 2,000 horsemen and four cannon he crossed the Cumberland river near Burkesville. Moving rapidly forward he met and defeated Wolford's Kentucky Union command. At Brandenburg on the Ohio his bold raiders captured two steamboats. Then, while one half of the command crossed the Ohio and attacked about 1,000 men on the Indiana side, Morgan with the other half turned his artillery on two gunboats that had come down the river to prevent the crossing, and drove them off. Then crossing the river Morgan dispersed or captured the whole Federal force. Next he captured Corydon and about 1,200 citizens and soldiers who tried to defend it. No pillaging was allowed. Only