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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 10, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 2 0 Browse Search
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mean Sir Colin Campbell, now Lord Clyde, of Clydesdale. He deserves the distinction he enjoys, for he has redeemed the British flag on the ensanguined, burning plains of India. He has restored the glory of the British name in Asia. I honor him; Scotland, England, Wales, and Ireland are ours; for their counties as well as their countries; and their poets, orators, and statesmen, and their generals belong to our history as well as to theirs. I will never disavow Henry V. on the plains of Agincourt; never Oliver Cromwell on the fields of Marston Moor and Naseby; never Sarsfield on the banks of the Boyne. The glories and honors of Sir Colin Campbell are the glories of the British race and of the races of Great Britain and Ireland from whom we are descended. But what gained Sir Colin Campbell the opportunity to achieve those glorious results in India? Remember that, and let us see what it was. On one of those bloody battles fought by the British before the Fortress of Sebastopol —
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
s in the same situation as if they were found assailed upon a flank. Therefore, this position is seldom taken, except against an enemy who should himself be formed in convex order to deliver battle, as will be seen hereafter. In truth, an army will rarely form a semi-circle, and will rather take a broken line reentrant towards the centre, (like figure 8 bis.) If we believe several writers, it was such a disposition which caused the English to triumph on the celebrated days of Crecy and Agincourt. It is certain that this order is better than a semi-circle, because it does not lend the flank so much, allows the marching in advance by echelon, and preserves with that all the effect of concentration of fire. However, its advantages disappear if the enemy, instead of throwing himself madly in the concave centre, confines himself to observing it from a distance, and throw himself with the mass of his forces upon one wing only. The battle of Essling, in 1809, offers still an example o
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
rdinary power than that of Venice. Edward III, debarked in France, and besieged Calais with eight hundred vessels and forty thousand men. Henry V made two descents, in 1414 and 1417; he had, it is said, one thousand five hundred vessels, and only thirty thousand men, six thousand of whom were cavalry. But, up to this epoch, and the taking of Constantinople, all the events that we have just related had had place before the invention of gunpowder; for, if Henry V had a few cannon at Agincourt, as is pretended, it is certain that they were not yet used in the marine. From that time all the combinations of armaments changed, and this revolution had place, thus to speak, at the same instant when the discovery of the mariner's compass, of the Cape of Good Hope and of America, were about to change also all the combinations of maritime commerce, and create an absolutely new colonial system. We shall not speak here of the Spanish expeditions to America, nor of those of the Portugu
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.31 (search)
ographies, spelling-books, histories, and school-readers, our Prayer-books and Bibles, were English. Yet the Welsh hated the English, and the reason for it I have never been able to discover, even to this day. We also detested the Paddys of the Square, because they were ragged, dirty, and quarrelsome, foul of speech, and noisy. We saw a few French, at least we were told they were French: they were too much despised to be hated. They belonged to that people who were beaten at Crecy, Agincourt, Blenheim, and Waterloo. I should therefore be false to myself if I stooped to say that the Welsh are the first people under the sun, and that Wales is the most beautiful country in the world. But, I am quite willing to admit that the Welsh are as good as any, and that they might surpass the majority of people if they tried, and that Wales contains within its limited area as beautiful scenes as any. The result of my observations is that in Nature the large part of humanity is on a pr
ean Sir Colin Campbell, now Lord Clyde of Clydesdale. He deserves the distinction he enjoys, for he has redeemed the British flag on the ensanguined, burning plains of India. He has restored the glory of the British name in Asia. I honor him. Scotland, England, Wales, and Ireland are open, for their counties, as well as their countries, and their poets, orators, and statesmen, and their generals, belong to our history as well as theirs. I will never disavow Henry V on the plains of Agincourt; never Oliver Cromwell on the fields of Marston Moor and Naseby; never Sarsfield on the banks of the Boyne. The glories and honors of Sir Campbell are the glories of the British race, and the races of Great Britain and Ireland, from whom we are descended. But what gained Sir Colin Campbell the opportunity to achieve those glorious results in India? Remember that, and let us see what it was. On one of those bloody battles fought by the British before the fortress of Sebastopol, in the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
an Athens crowded within her historic gates, when her sons, under Miltiades, won liberty for mankind on the field of Marathon; more than Sparta contained when she ruled Greece, and sent forth her devoted children, quickened by a mother's benediction, to return with their shields, or on them; more than Rome gathered on her seven hills, when, under her kings, she commenced that sovereign sway, which afterwards embraced the whole earth; more than London held when, on the fields of Crecy and Agincourt, the English banner was carried victoriously over the chivalrous hosts of France. Against this Territory, thus fortunate in position and population, a crime has been committed, which is without example in the records of the past. Not in plundered provinces or in the cruelties of selfish governors will you find its parallel; and yet there is an ancient instance, which may show at least the path of justice. In the terrible impeachment by which the great Roman orator has blasted through
let into a recess in the side of the vessel, and is caught by a bolt which passes through the side and is secured in the interior. The following statement from the London times contains the dimensions of a number of English ironclads, with the thickness of their armor, etc. Names.Tonnage.Horse-Power.Length.Beam.Protected Guns designed for.Thickness of Armor.Thickness of Backing. Achilles6,2211,25038058264 1/218 Black Prince6,1091,85038058264 1/218 Warrior6,1091,25038058264 1/218 Agincourt6,6211,35040059365 1/210 Minotaur6,6211,35040059365 1/210 Northumberland6,6211,35040059365 1/210 Hector4,08980028056324 1/218 Valiant4,06380028056324 1/218 Defence3,72060028054164 1/218 Resistance3,71060028054164 1/218 Caledonia4,1251,00027359324 1/2Wood ship, side 29 1/2 in. Ocean4,0471,00027358324 1/2Wood ship, side 29 1/2 in. Prince Consort4,0451,00027358324 1/2Wood ship, side 29 1/2 in. Royal Alfred4,06880027358324 1/2, 6Wood ship, side 29 1/2 in. Royal Oak4,05680027358324 1/
of the Ethiopians were of agate and other siliceous stones. Pieces of stone of the kind used in engraving seals. — Ibid. The bows of the Ethiopians were of the stem of the palm-leaf. Pliny says: It is by the aid of the reed that the nations of the East decide their wars. Fully one half of mankind live under a dominion imposed by the agency of the arrow. The Eastern reed, so called, was a bamboo. Harold, William Rufus, and Richard I. were killed by arrows. Crecy, Poictiers, and Agincourt were won by archers. The long-bow of that time measured six feet, the arrow three feet. The range was 300 to 500 yards. In the Southwest of England bows and arrows did not finally disappear from the muster-roll till 1599. The muskets were such miserable affairs that in the middle of the fifteenth century it took fifteen minutes to charge and fire one. 2. (Husbandry.) The bent piece which embraces the neck of an ox, the ends coming up through the yoke, above which they are fastene
s broadside views of a number of English iron-clads, and is introduced to illustrate the modes of arming and of protecting; the shaded portions indicating the partial protection only, afforded in some instances to the battery and engines, and at about the water-line. a shows the Warrior and Black Prince class of 6,039 tons. b, the Achilles, of the same size. c, the Defence and Resistance, 3,668 tons. d, the Hector and Valiant, 4,063 tons. c, the Northumberland, Minotaur, and Agincourt, 6,621 tons. f, the Prince Consort, Royal oak, Royal Alfred, Ocean triumph, and Caledonia, 4,045 tons. g, the Royal sovereign, 5-turreted vessel, 3,765 tons. h, the Prince Albert, 6-turreted vessel, 2,529 tons. i, a two-shield ship of 1,385 tons. j, the Enterprise, 990 tons. k, the Favorite, 2,186 tons. The lower portion of the figure is a midship section of a British iron-clad ship of 1,385 tons, carrying two of the shields as adapted by Captain Coles of the British s
han Athens crowded within her historic gates, when her sons, under Miltiades, won liberty for mankind on the field of Marathon,— more than Sparta contained, when she ruled Greece, and sent forth her devoted children, quickened by a mother's benediction, to return with their shields or on them,—more than Rome gathered on her seven hills, when, under her kings, she commenced that sovereign sway which afterwards embraced the whole earth,—more than London held, when, on the fields of Crecy and Agincourt, the English banner was borne victorious over the chivalrous hosts of France. Against this Territory, thus fortunate in position and population, a Crime has been committed which is without example in the records of the Past. Not in plundered provinces or in the cruelties of selfish governors will you find its parallel; and yet there is an ancient instance which may show, at least, the path of justice. In the terrible impeachment by which the Roman Orator has blasted through all time t<
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